Australian Pure Bred Dog Forums - Dogz Online: Attention All People In Rescue - Australian Pure Bred Dog Forums - Dogz Online

Jump to content

  • 3 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Old topic!
This topic has had no activity for over 365 days. Due to that, you will not be able to reply. Please create a new topic!

Attention All People In Rescue

#1 User is offline   shmoo 

  • fostermanual.com
  • Posts: 14,860
  • Joined: 15-April 04
  • Location:Glenmore Park, Sydney NSW
  • State:NSW

  Posted 19 August 2007 - 12:14 AM

There have been some incidents recently that have really highlighted to me just how disordered and muddled rescue can be. The bombardment of appeals never lets up and keeps many rescuers in a constant state of emergency, rushing to retrieve dogs and rushing to place them, in a frantic effort to keep pace.

Here a some important points to remember:

1. DOL rescue is not the be all and end all of rescue. A hell of alot goes on behind the scenes and not every pound is listed on DOL. There are many other dogs on death row in other shelters that need just as much help. There are also MANY rescuers who are not on DOL, and have not even heard of DOL.

2. Not everybody on DOL rescue is an educated, experienced rescuer or foster carer. If ANY group wishes to pursue a member on the forum offering foster care for a dog it is the RESCUE GROUPS responsibility to check out the foster carer, regardless of how well they paint themselves. This includes a house and yard check, background check with other groups (if possible) and for a member of the group, preferably from the committee, to meet the potential foster carer and mark them as sound to foster.

3. If you see a dog on DOL rescue and want to help, do the right thing. Research which group you want to join with, take the necessary steps to becoming a fully fledged carer. Being a foster care provider takes time, dedication, and genuine caring. Fostering a shelter pet is a full time job. Temperament assessments are always advised before taking on a rescue dog and it is strongly advised you do this YOURSELF to make sure YOU are satisfied with the dog and are 100% positive you can provide care for the term of fostering.

4. If you are unsure on the status on a dog you have seen on DOL. Call the pound directly. www.operationtoby.com is a good place to start looking if you need to view a pound webpage for details. Be patient, be courteous, be clear and be specific. The pound staff do not enjoy the worst part of their job and it is not their fault that not every animal can be saved. If you wish to comment on the procedures of a pound, its conditions or operations, take the appropriate action ie: contact the supervisior, manager or council via email, mail or phone. Unless you are speaking on behalf of a rescue group, do not say you are.

5. When offering or asking for transport, be clear about what is needed. Give as much information as possible. Dates, times, locations, phone numbers.... Everything that might be needed, just might be needed. For rescuers asking others on DOL to pick up and drop off, make sure that all paperwork is completed at each end to save time, confusion and dogs being incorrectly chipped.

6. If you are going to say yes you can take a dog, be sure that all communication between you, the rescue group and the pound is clear. If you are unsure of anything, do not hesitate to ask. This may end in the dog being PTS even if it had a place to go, simply because communication was puzzled.

7. Try to avoid asking others to post on your behalf. This only leads to confusion and inevitably dogs may suffer. While many of us know each other in real life, many don't. One person may not realise which people belong to same groups, or how close rescuers may live to each other etc.



Key points for preventing burn out.

- Recognise and accept that you cannot save every animal.
- Use common sense.
- Learn to say no.
- Ask for help.
- Be patient.
- Know your limits.
- Know when to quit.

For anybody interested in becoming a foster carer, please PM me and I will forward you the first part of my book - A Guide To Foster Caring.

Emotion plays a large part in rescue, but emotion as the driving force can have significant drawbacks. We all have to respect our own and each others abilities and limitations.

And remember: if you have no room for just one more dog, don’t take just one more dog.

This post has been edited by shmoo: 19 August 2007 - 12:43 AM


#2 User is offline   lilli 

  • Çoban Köpekleri
  • Posts: 5,605
  • Joined: 12-August 06
  • Location:I followed my heart through Byzantium, across the Caspian to the Khan steppes, and there's no way home really.
  • State:Overseas

Posted 19 August 2007 - 12:30 AM

Great post shmoo :rofl:
Rescue has so many different facets
some are community based
others operate within a breed or club network -
DOL is just one of many rescue communication hubs and resource sharing platforms.

#3 User is offline   Muttly 

  • Mad working dog owner
  • Posts: 10,750
  • Joined: 02-February 05
  • Location:Southern Tablelands.
  • State:ACT

Posted 19 August 2007 - 12:38 AM

Good post Shmoo, though it is good for people to consider the consequences of saying they will take a dog.

#4 User is offline   shmoo 

  • fostermanual.com
  • Posts: 14,860
  • Joined: 15-April 04
  • Location:Glenmore Park, Sydney NSW
  • State:NSW

Posted 19 August 2007 - 12:40 AM

View PostARF Muttly, on 19th Aug 2007 - 12:38 AM, said:

Good post Shmoo, though it is good for people to consider the consequences of saying they will take a dog.



good point, will edit.

#5 User is offline   Muttly 

  • Mad working dog owner
  • Posts: 10,750
  • Joined: 02-February 05
  • Location:Southern Tablelands.
  • State:ACT

Posted 19 August 2007 - 12:51 AM

thanks because it happens again and again where people sit back who could otherwise save don't because there is thought to be no need :rofl:

#6 User is offline   shmoo 

  • fostermanual.com
  • Posts: 14,860
  • Joined: 15-April 04
  • Location:Glenmore Park, Sydney NSW
  • State:NSW

Posted 19 August 2007 - 12:52 AM

View PostARF Muttly, on 19th Aug 2007 - 12:51 AM, said:

thanks because it happens again and again where people sit back who could otherwise save don't because there is thought to be no need :rofl:



yup :laugh:

#7 User is offline   Kaz 

  • Forum Regular
  • Posts: 9,489
  • Joined: 30-May 06
  • Location:Paradise
  • State:NSW

Posted 19 August 2007 - 06:58 AM

Great post Shmoo :rofl:

I would just like to add that if you are considering becoming a foster carer for a dog. PLEASE JOIN A RESCUE GROUP NOW!!!!

It's no use waiting until you see a particular dog on death row that you would like to help. It may be a couple of weeks before your application to join is processed, home checks done, etc, by which time it may be too late.

Joining a rescue group doesn't mean you must immediately foster a dog. Get the paperwork sorted, sit back, and if you see a dog you want to save, then you just have to put your hand up and there is no final mad rush with all the related stress and heartache.

#8 User is offline   KittyKat 

  • Forum Regular
  • Posts: 661
  • Joined: 04-January 07
  • Location:my laptop

Posted 19 August 2007 - 07:26 AM

Great post Shmoo :rofl: :laugh: Can't wait for the book to come out!

#9 User is offline   catzatsea 

  • A "Dark Side" Convert!!
  • Posts: 2,184
  • Joined: 12-January 05
  • Location:Exactly where I need to be!!
  • State:NSW

Posted 19 August 2007 - 08:09 AM

Great Post Shmoo - Maybe it is worth a request to get this pinned???? :rofl:

#10 User is offline   griff 

  • missing my dogs :(
  • Posts: 33,544
  • Joined: 11-March 04
  • Location:west 'o' sydney
  • State:NSW

Posted 19 August 2007 - 11:08 AM

echo . . . . :rofl: , Good post shmoo :laugh:

#11 User is offline   tramissa 

  • Forum Regular
  • Posts: 5,184
  • Joined: 04-April 05

Posted 19 August 2007 - 11:19 AM

Definitely pinning material - well written Shmoo.

#12 User is offline   panlewis 

  • Foster Carers
  • Posts: 571
  • Joined: 22-July 04
  • Location:Western Sydney.......(Gods Country !!!)

Posted 19 August 2007 - 11:44 AM

Fantastic post Shmoo !!!

GREAT WORK !

Let me just reinforce what you said about jumping in at the last minute !

Emotion plays a huge part in what rescue is all about but we cannot let out hearts rule our heads no matter how guilty you may feel
about a last minute plea !

The sad fact is, some dogs will always be PTS and we can't save them all

Please, if you are considering wanting to foster care, join a group and be a little considerate giving the group time to organise things
for you - this also gives you breathing space to consider the committment that you are making.

Foster caring can really be a very rewarding and fulfilling experience but it shouldn't be an impulsive decision to make.

#13 User is offline   Greytmate 

  • Forum Regular
  • Posts: 20,615
  • Joined: 06-April 04
  • Location:Queensland
  • State:QLD

Posted 19 August 2007 - 01:16 PM

What a good post Schmoo.

There is one part that I would question

"Temperament assessments are always advised before taking on a rescue dog and it is strongly advised you do this YOURSELF to make sure YOU are satisfied with the dog and are 100% positive you can provide care for the term of fostering."

If you are aiming your post at an audience that is new to rescue or foster care, then that person may not have the knowledge or experience to conduct an appropriate behaviour test. To say that a dog has been temperament tested, when it has not been tested by somebody qualified to test could have unpleasant ramifications.

I am not saying that formal qualifications are needed, but the person needs to have a clear idea of what they are testing for, what constitutes a pass or fail, and the limits of the testing. I believe that a pre-foster assessment should not be referred to as a temperament test, it is only a behaviour test.

My suggested amendment to your post would be

"Pre-foster behaviour assessments are always advised before taking on a rescue dog and it is strongly advised that the test result is properly documented and fully understood by you, so that you can satisfy yourself that you are able to provide the neccessary care and management of the dog for the term of fostering."


I don't mean to sound picky, because I think that the work you are doing is brilliant, will help countless dogs find their way into loving new homes, and make foster caring a worthwhile and enjoyable reality for many who would otherwise be too daunted to try. I do want a copy of your book please. :)

#14 User is offline   Dame Danny's Darling 

  • Arise Dame DD
  • Posts: 23,315
  • Joined: 09-February 03
  • Location:Near Hornsby
  • State:NSW

Posted 19 August 2007 - 01:31 PM

Echoing the others - excellent work.

What happens on DOL is that (I am making a great assumption leap here :) ) is that most newcomers don't read the instructions for posting, the pinned posts at the top of individual forums amd just hop on with their ideas and/or queries. Through no fault of their own, many - probably most - have absolutely no idea that rescue organisations exist let alone that there is a huge network of people working for the rescue organisations.

So they see dogs listed in the pounds as needing help and immediately assume that if they personally don't do something, the dogs will die. It is as others have said a very emotive issue and people are very easily drawn in.

They also start to see the good work that well organised and well supported rescue groups do and think: gee that's easy, I could do that. Etc etc and before too long they are over their heads financially and emotionally and have to be baled out.

Recently a relative newcomer rescued a pregnant female, the puppies were born and all those puppies have been homed - UNDESEXED.

Maybe there could be a few pinned topics that could be set up like some websites that you have to agree to the terms of conditions before you can proceed. Another clunky bureaucratic imposition, but it would help in the education of newcomers.

#15 User is offline   juice 

  • juice
  • Posts: 8,475
  • Joined: 23-September 04
  • Location:glenwood,sydney.
  • State:NSW

Posted 19 August 2007 - 01:35 PM

good post, however, temp testing at a pound is near impossible. perhaps people need to be more aware of their own dogs, and their reactions to sharing their home with a new dog. alot of people have no idea if their dogs are dominant, submissive, good with both sexes etc.
a good knowledge of your own situation, and what you can cope with is vital :)

Share this topic:



Old topic!
This topic has had no activity for over 365 days. Due to that, you will not be able to reply. Please create a new topic!

  • 3 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users


Privacy Policy | Web Site Terms and Conditions