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German Shorthaired Pointer

#1 User is offline   Troy 

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 05:44 PM

The German Shorthaired Pointer

Quote

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org....ails.asp?bid=84 )

Group: Group 3 (Gundogs)

General Appearance: A dog of noble and balanced appearance, the conformation of which ensures strength, endurance and speed. Proud attitude, smooth outlines, lean head, well carried tail, firm shiny coat and well reaching, harmonious strides emphasise its nobility.

Characteristics: Not Specified.

Temperament: Firm, balanced, reliable, restrained temperament. Neither nervous, nor shy or aggressive.

Head And Skull: Lean, well defined, neither too light nor too heavy; as to strength and length it matches the substance and the sex of the dog.

Skull: Moderately wide, flatly rounded, scarcely pronounced occipital bone, front furrow not too deep, noticeably developed superciliary ridges.

Stop: Moderately developed

Foreface
Nose: Somewhat protruding. Nostrils sufficiently wide, broad and mobile. Basically brown, however black in black or black roan dogs. A flesh-coloured or spotted nose is only permissible in dogs with white as a basic colour.
Muzzle: Long, broad, deep and strong in order to enable the dog's correct carrying of game. Viewed from the side the nasal bridge shows a slight curvature in all transitions from a nobly constructed ram's nose to a slight rise above the straight line, more prominent in the males. A totally straight nasal bridge, although still acceptable, is less attractive; a concave bridge (dish-face) is a serious fault.
Flews: Tight fitting, not too pendulous, good pigmentation. The naso-labial line slopes almost vertically and then continues in a flat arch to the moderately pronounced corner of the lips.
Cheeks: Strong, well muscled.

Eyes: Of medium size, neither protruding nor deep set. The ideal colour is dark brown. Eyelids tight fitting.

Ears: Moderately long, set on high and broad, flat and without twisting hanging down close to the head, bluntly rounded at the tip. Neither too fleshy nor too thin. When brought forward they should reach to approximately the corner of the lips.

Mouth: Strong jaws with a perfect, regular scissor bite. The upper incisors should reach over the lower incisors without a gap and the teeth should be positioned vertically in the jaws. 42 sound teeth, in accordance with the teeth formula.

Neck: Length in harmony with the general appearance of the dog, progressively thickening towards the body. Very muscular and slightly crested nape. Tight fitting skin of throat.

Forequarters: General appearance: Viewed from the front, straight and parallel; viewed from the side, the legs are well placed under the body.

Shoulders: Shoulder blades well laid back, well attached to chest, and strongly muscled. Shoulder blade and upper arm well angulated.
Upper arm: As long as possible, well muscled and dry.
Elbow: Close but not too tight to body, neither turned in or out, well set back.
Forearm: Straight and sufficiently muscled. Strong bone, not too coarse.
Pastern joint: Strong
Pastern: Minimal angulation of pastern and forearm, never standing upright.

Body: Topline: Straight and slightly sloping.
Withers: Well defined
Back: Firm and muscular. Vertebral processes should be covered by muscles.
Loin: Short, broad, muscular, straight or slightly arched. Transition from back to loin tight and well knit.
Croup: Broad and long enough, not abruptly slanting, but slightly slanting towards the tail, well muscled.
Chest: Somewhat deeper than broad with well defined forechest, with the sternum reaching back as far as possible. Sternum and elbow joint on the same level. Ribs well sprung, neither flat nor barrel-shaped. False ribs reaching well down.
Underline: With elegant arch, slightly tucked up towards rear, dry.

Hindquarters: General appearance: Viewed from behind straight and parallel. Good angulation in stifles and hocks, strong bone.
Upper thigh: Long, broad and muscular, with good angulation between pelvis and femur.
Stifle: Strong, with good angulation of upper and lower thigh.
Lower thigh: Long, muscular with clearly visible tendons. Good angulation between lower thigh and hocks.
Hock joint: Strong.
Hocks: Strong, vertical.

Feet: Round to spoon shaped, with well tight and adequately arched toes. Strong toenails. Tough, resistant pads. Feet set parallel, neither turned in nor out, in stance as well as movement.

Tail: Set high, strong at the root and then tapering, of medium length. About halfway docked for hunting purposes. At rest hanging down; in movement horizontal, neither carried too high above the backline nor extremely bent. (In countries where the tail docking is prohibited by law, the tail can remain in its natural shape. It should reach as far as the hocks and be carried straight or slightly sabre tail fashion).

Gait/Movement: Well extended strides, with forceful propulsion from the hindquarters and adequate reach of the forelimbs. Front and hind legs moving straight and parallel. The dog is carrying himself in a proud attitude. Pacing gait is not desirable.

Coat: Skin: Close and tight, not wrinkly.
Texture: Short and dense, rough and hard to the touch. Somewhat thinner and shorter on the head and ears, not remarkably longer at the underside of the tail. Should cover the whole body.

Colour: Solid brown, without markings.
Brown with small white or flecked markings at chest and legs.
Dark brown roan, with brown head, brown patches or specks. The basic colour of such a dog is not brown mixed with white or white with brown, but the coat shows such an even intensive mixture of brown and white which results in that kind of inconspicuous exterior of the dog ever so valuable for the practical hunt. At the inner sides of the hindlegs as well as the tip of the tail the colour is often lighter.
Light brown roan with brown head, brown patches, specks or without patches. In this colouring the brown hairs are fewer, the white hairs are predominant.
White with brown head markings, brown patches or specks.
Black colour in the same nuances as the brown, respectively the brown roan colours.
Yellow tan markings are permissible.
Blaze, fleck and speckles flews are permissible.

Sizes: Height at the withers:
Dogs 62-66 cms
Bitches 58-63 cms

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog, and on the dog�s ability to perform its traditional work.

Faults in attitude, not according or typical to gender.
Muzzle too short
Flews too heavy or too thin
From the total of 4 PM 1 and 2 m3 only two teeth may be missing.
Eyes too light. Yellowish, bird of prey eyes.
Ears too long, too short, too heavy, set on too narrow or twisted.
Loose skin at throat.
Slight roach back.
Rump (croup) too short.
Chest too deep.
Tail strongly bent or carried too high above the topline.
Elbows turned in or out. Feet turned in or out. Forelegs standing close or wide.
Hindquarters too straight.
Slightly bow-legged, slightly cow-hocked or close hocks.

SERIOUS FAULTS
Clumsy, lymphatic, coarse conformation.
Marked stop.
Flesh-coloured or flecked nose (except when basic colour of coat is white).Snipy muzzle, concave bridge of the nose (dishface).
Pincer bite or partial pincer bite.
Distinct roach back, slight swayback.
Considerable lack in depth of chest. Poorly developed forechest. Ribs too flat or barrel shaped.
Distinctly turned in or out elbows.
Weak and down on pasterns.
Pastern totally vertical
Distinctly cow-hocked or bow-legged, in stance as well as in movement.
Overbuilt hindquarters.
Flat feet.
Spread toes.
Clumsy gait.
Deviation of more than 2 cm from the given height at the withers.

DISQUALIFYING FAULTS
Distinctly non-typical gender characteristics.
Absence of more than 2 teeth from the total of 4 PM1 and 2M3. Absence of 1 tooth or more other than PM1 and M3.
Non visible teeth have to be considered as missing.
Overshot or undershot bite, wry mouth as well as all intergrades.
Any surplus teeth arranged outside the dental arch.
Cleft palate and hare lip.
Excessively loose eyelids, ectropian, entropian, distichiasis (double row of eyelashes).
Excessive swayback, malformation of the spine.
Any malformation of the chest, e.g. clipped sternum (short sternum blending abruptly into the abdominal line).
Rear dewclaws with or without bony skeleton.
Weak character.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.


See Photos of the German Shorthaired Pointer

Quote

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)


If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.


See Photos of the German Shorthaired Pointer

German Shorthaired Pointer Breeders

German Shorthaired Pointer Puppies For Sale

#2 User is offline   Tambaqui 

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 08:09 PM

-

This post has been edited by Tambaqui: 22 October 2013 - 07:08 PM


#3 User is offline   TangerineDream 

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 09:59 PM

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)
Tango is my second GSP - have owned them since 1996.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

I am not well versed on the breed development, but I am sure someone else may cover this aspect.

3. How common is it in Australia?
GSP's are not very common - I've found that travelling with a GSP will get you lots of attention - a few people will know that you have a GSP, the rest of the population sees a beatiful dog and wants to come and talk to it but doesn't know the breed.

4. What is the average lifespan?
11-14 years

5. What is the general temperament/personality?
GSP's generally approach life 'with a smile on their face' - they are a cheerful dog, generally well balanced in temperament and very sociable, but will tend to choose 1 or 2 people to be their 'favourites'. They are very bright and trainable (but are also bright enough to be able to think their way into trouble). The word is 'enthusiasm'.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?
Depends on the dog and the season. Generally they seem to be more active in cool weather (except when lying in front of the heater) and are happy to lounge around in hot weather. Some will retrieve endlessly and all delight in daily walks.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?
I would recommend learning about the breed well before committing to becoming an owner...and getting to know a number of members of the breed. They are very bright, do need training from Day1 so you do need to know what you are doing or they can outhink you.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?
If used to being a solo dog, yes, both of mine have been fine with me working and being away from home for long days. If they have toys and a clamshell full of water for summer (and for dropping things into so they can 'bob' for them) and a spot to have an occasional dig (a gravel pit works well), and a bed to watch the world go by from) they are fine.

9. How much grooming is required?
Regular (but brief) grooming with a hound glove will strip out the dead hair from the coat. They have a coat that doesn't hold dirt and is 'self cleaning'.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?
They can be boisterous when young, but overall are fairly sensible when they understand the behavious required.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?
None that I have had any problems with

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

This post has been edited by TangerineDream: 02 August 2009 - 10:01 PM


#4 User is offline   VJB 

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 10:39 PM

[quote]QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Family owned one when I was growing up, now I own a 1 year old.

3. How common is it in Australia?

Fairly common, although I rarely see them around my district.

4. What is the average lifespan?

12 -14 yrs

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Even temperament, excitable, loves people/children, and being part of the family. Very smart, eager to please, affectionate and mischief all rolled into one.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

At least an hours walk daily, or leash free run. As well as mental stimulation to occupy (sand pit, throw/retrieve games/and anything else they get amusement from).

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I wouldn't say to anyone to get a GSP without first doing the research and being confident in committing to the lifestyle requirements needed. A very easy breed to love, but you sure need to be "on the ball".

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

I've heard of many that are left for long hours, some with good stories, some with bad. I guess it depends on the lifestyle provided outside those hours. They DO need human companionship.

9. How much grooming is required?

Very very little. A brush with a mitt occasionally is all we do here. Depends on your area and where the dog resides.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

YES, I would not be comfortable with very small children with a boisterous young GSP, and they do stay "young" for quite some time. My children are 8 & 10 and cope very well, though most of this requires training the kids as much as the dog. They can easily knock an adult flying with zoomies, and do not realize their strength at times.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

None that I am aware of.

#5 User is offline   FHRP 

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 09:27 AM

1. What is my relationship with the breed?

First time owner, long time admirer :cry:

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

http://www.barkbytes...tory/gshpnt.htm
" As the name implies, the country of origin of this breed of dog was Germany. German Shorthaired Pointers have been known to be a distinct and separate breed probably since the 17th century. However, the dog that we identify as a GSP today was developed by a group made up of dedicated noblemen and sportsmen towards the end of the 19th century. It is important to note that these people had a very specific purpose in developing this breed. They wanted a personal gun dog, that could "sense, find, point, mark, and return game in the field and out of the water." They also wanted a companion and family dog. They wanted it all, a dog that could do anything. Prior to this time, noblemen would keep large kennels with a variety of dogs depending on what he wanted to hunt that day. Each dog would have a specialty, earth dogs, field dogs, water spaniels, etc. The philosophy of the developers of the GSP was "Those that have many dogs do not have any dogs." It is believed that these developers selectively bred to the German Pointer, the Spanish Pointer, the English Pointer, and various scent hounds until they arrived at what we know today as the German Shorthaired Pointer. "


3. How common is it in Australia?

There were 629 GSPs registered with the ANKC in 2008 which was 4th the most numerous gundog to be registered, so they are failry common. They are the most common breed to compete in Utility Field Trials and are well represented numerically at shows, but I see them under represented in the obeience ring.

4. What is the average lifespan?

12-14 years

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

The breed standard says "Firm, balanced, reliable, restrained temperament. Neither nervous, nor shy or aggressive. " which is true. They are biddable, friendly dogs with lots of energy. Aggression should never be tolerated in any colour of the breed, and neither should nervousness. These dogs are bred to work for people and around other dogs, so tolerance and compliance is a must. They are a highly trainable breed who are responsive and keen. I have found positive training the best way to train the breed, while being consistent and firm. Personally I have sen no difference between the colours, every black and white GSP I've met (which is limited) has had a very good nature.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?


GSPs are high energy dogs who need an energy outlet every day. Off lead exercise is ideal and they will take as much as you can give. Hunting, agility, obedience, retrieving, playing are all good ways to exercise your GSP. I'd say a minumum of an hour exercise each day.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Easily, no. But possible if you know what you're getting yourself into. GSPs are active and smart dogs. Training must begin as soon as the pup/dog comes home and some experience certainly helps there. Normal pups can seem over the top for first time owner with their energy, mouthing and naughtiness.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

No. GSPs like company and need to be part of the family. Having said that my GSP is in a dog run by himself during work hours, however I spend a lot of time exercising and training him before and after work. If you put the time and training in at other times, they will kennel OK.

9. How much grooming is required?


Very little. Their short coat needs little maintanence, bathing only when 'smelly' or dirty. From reading through the breed thread here on DOL ear issues appear to crop up often, so inspecting and cleaning of ears should be regular.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

As a rule, yes, I would say that GSPs are too boisterous for little children or infirm people. They are a large breed dog with good intentions but are bouncy and boisterous and could easily accidentaly knock someone over. Especially puppy and adolescent GSPs. However, if carefully managed while ensuring the dog is still part of the family, GSPs can co-exist with young children and the infirm. Be prepared for lots of early training.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

As with any larger breed hip and elbow displaysia can occur in the breed. Eye problems have been seen in the breed such as entropian and PRA.

Temperament is something that a puppy buyer should be especially aware of. Although not always entirely hereditary I would still be looking for good temperaments in the parents of any pups. Aggression has already been mentioned in this thread, and it is not only seen in black and white individuals, but all colours and patterns unfortunately. By far in the minority, but no GSP of questionable temperament should ever be bred from IMO.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Puppy buyers should be trying to purchase from hip and elbow scored parents, however it is still an uncommon practice amongst breeders. I think the average hip score is around 7-8 total, so anything over that in either parent you should be cautious about. Elbows should be 0 and I'd stear clear of anything from a dog with higher than a total of 1. Ask if there's any history of eye problems and if they test eyes before breeding.

As already mentioned, try and meet as many individuals of the breed, and breeders as you can. See what you like and go from there. When I got my boy I had fallen in love with his sire and wanted something from him. I couldn't be happier with the result!

#6 User is offline   Lucy's mama 

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 02:21 PM

I have a question about their excitability. Do they calm down after a bit?

Eg, I get home fom work, completely ignore the pup till we are inside, school bags away etc, (don't want him learning to run out and greet, jump expect play before I can even get in the door) THEN go pat/throw ball for 20 min. At the end of that and a bit of a calming pat and cuddle, will they generally be calm enough to sit, stay, walk on lead, get into the car for an outing or concentrate on a training session etc without quivering in excitement? Or is it constant wound up rubber band type thing?

I have had a quivering, about to explode with excitement dog before, he would seriously shake and whine with the effort it took for him to sit and stay, and looked like he might hurl himself out of his skin at any minute. Training was possible but exasperating. He would try so hard but couldn't contain himself for any length of time. The vet diagnosed him as having the doggie equivalent of ADHD and recommended he be on low dose sedatives on a permanant basis :eek: (I declined)

Are GSP THAT excitable, or just very happy, active dogs?

I suppose I really need to meet some soon. Any volunteers?

This post has been edited by Lucy's mama: 03 August 2009 - 02:23 PM


#7 User is offline   FionaC 

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  Posted 03 August 2009 - 05:18 PM

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

First time owner and now completely under the GSP spell .... We have Mort who is almost 13mths old and we are on the waiting list to add another boy to the family

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

FHRP did the breed background bit

3. How common is it in Australia?

Well in our local area they are not very common - but in the last 11mths since we've had Mort at home we have seen and met maybe 10 other GSP's in the Newcastle area....

4. What is the average lifespan?

Not long enough! - 12-14yrs but they live 100 years worth of enthusiasm and energy and love for life during that time

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

I can only go off my boy but he is a kind, sweet and loving animal .... he is also a complete boofhead and a sookie-la-la (but thats what I like) .... he is boisterous and doesn't know his own strength at times and can sometimes play too rough but on other occasions I have seen him be as gentle as a lamb with people, puppies and children... they are smart animals (smart enough to hide their intelligence behind a veneer of goofiness) and are amazing to see learn... it can be frustrating to train to begin with cause everything is a game and it has to be worth it for them but when they hit that point where it just works for them - nothing is too much bother!

I prefer males to females but its a personal thing ... I like having a big dog with a big deep bark for those nights I'm at home or walking him alone but I also love that he snuggles on the lounge and is happiest wherever we are no matter what we are doing (he just went to Jindabyne for a weekend and travelled down and back in the car with no fuss, whinging or whimpering)...

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

ahhhhhh yes the exercise .... a lot :mad - for example in a week we will try to get in a walk each evening after work, about 10 minutes of Obedience training at home each evening as well. On Wed and Sunday we do Obedience class (1hr on Wed evening and 1.5hrs on a Sunday morning) and we are also doing Pre-Agility training Sunday mornings ... Saturday its usually a run at the beach with a swim .... in summer we hit the off lead beach 3-4 times a week after work (about 10minute away from home) plus the Obedience classes and this year it will also be plus Agility .... however if it is raining and miserable outside he copes well with a short walk or a run around with some tug toy games under cover ..... but thats cause we are working towards trialing in both Obedience and Agility - we could get away with less if we wanted to

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Yes - well I have to say that since I am a first time dog owner :eek: but I researched the breed and the breeder we got him from quite thoroughly before we contacted them about him .... I knew what we were getting ourselves into and the GSP on paper seemed to best match what we wanted in an dog and what our lives worked best with - and thankfully we were rewarded with a perfect match of a dog

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Mort does - he is inside in the sunroom from about 8am - 5/6pm in the evenings and has been on that routine since he was little ... he has toys, kongs and sunshine .... however as he has gotten older we do notice how much he would enjoy the company of another dog and we always wanted 2 so we will be getting another pup in the next 6-12mths (hopefully if the right pup comes along)

9. How much grooming is required?

Practically nil .... he gets bath occasionally and he dries off quickly ... just regular ear care and nail clipping and that it ....

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Can be most definitely - Morty doesn't know his own strength sometimes however he's never knocked anyone over before and I have a 4yr old niece that he sees a lot.... but they are full of beans and can be jumpy and they are a big dog .... so training is a definite must!

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

FHRP covered this the best

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

I'd be telling the breeder of your situation and then asking them if they have a pup that matches for you - Mort's sister is Fyx who's owner is also a DOL member and several of the GSP's on the GSP thread are related to him so you can see the different personalities of the GSP's as they have been growing up and getting older - none are the same and all have their little quirks which is great .... we asked our breeder for a dog that would fit with us, that matched what we had to offer and that was going to be a family member - Mort was that choice and he is perfect for us ....

Health Tests etc - what FHRP said :cry:


I love my GSP!

This post has been edited by FionaC: 03 August 2009 - 05:21 PM


#8 User is offline   FHRP 

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 05:54 PM

View PostLucy's mama, on 3rd Aug 2009 - 02:21 PM, said:

I have a question about their excitability. Do they calm down after a bit?

Eg, I get home fom work, completely ignore the pup till we are inside, school bags away etc, (don't want him learning to run out and greet, jump expect play before I can even get in the door) THEN go pat/throw ball for 20 min. At the end of that and a bit of a calming pat and cuddle, will they generally be calm enough to sit, stay, walk on lead, get into the car for an outing or concentrate on a training session etc without quivering in excitement? Or is it constant wound up rubber band type thing?

I have had a quivering, about to explode with excitement dog before, he would seriously shake and whine with the effort it took for him to sit and stay, and looked like he might hurl himself out of his skin at any minute. Training was possible but exasperating. He would try so hard but couldn't contain himself for any length of time. The vet diagnosed him as having the doggie equivalent of ADHD and recommended he be on low dose sedatives on a permanant basis :heart: (I declined)

Are GSP THAT excitable, or just very happy, active dogs?

I suppose I really need to meet some soon. Any volunteers?

GSP are active, excitable dogs, but they do settle. They can sit calmly and walk nicely on a lead. However, be prepared for training :p Many of Polo's early lessons were on self control. He had to learn not to barge through things, to be patient and wait his turn. To train a calm dog you need to be calm youself, so getting frenzied around an excitable GSP will only encourage excitement.

There are times in training and trialing that Polo will quiver with excitement, usually when the activity is highly rewarding for him, such as Retrieving.

#9 User is offline   Staffyluv 

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 06:20 PM

I have a question about this breed also:
We have two dogs that live next door to us that look the same (some shape, colouring etc) but they have longer hair - sort of wire haired version. Is this a different breed altogether or just another version of the GSP - say a wire hair GSP?

Thanks in advance

#10 User is offline   FHRP 

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 07:06 PM

Staffyluv, there are German Wirehaired Pointers too, a seperate breed and can not be bred with GSPs. Often referred to as GWP's :heart:

This post has been edited by FHRP: 03 August 2009 - 07:06 PM


#11 User is offline   SparkyTansy 

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 07:12 PM

staffyluv they would be the German Wirehaired Pointer - similar but not the same and bred and shown as a separate breed.

#12 User is offline   Tambaqui 

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 07:32 PM

View PostLucy's mama, on 3rd Aug 2009 - 02:21 PM, said:

I have a question about their excitability. Do they calm down after a bit?

Are GSP THAT excitable, or just very happy, active dogs?


They are definitely over the top and very hyperactive breed! The best word is enthusiastic! (Sorry to anyone if I offended with what I have said, but it was based on experiences I have seen, and I recognize that not all of them are the same in personality)

My little Bella is out in the main yard with another dog, and everytime I tried to open the gate to access it, they'd both try and get through, but I use a very firm "AH-AH!" and she is very responsive and learns that she has to stay in that yard.

Bella doesn't jump on people or dogs, but she has been warned before, so she knows she is not allowed to do it as well, and again it training the moment they come home.

I find usually at night, or they do get placid and not bother coming out of their bed as they do get tired and also after a good run or training at the club (or even showing!).

But if you're after a GSP and expecting them to be laid back and such, then you're looking at the wrong breed lol! (My breeder told be they are so laid back and placid, but frankly every GSP I've seen, including mine are quite the opposite!)

But they are an absolute sweetheart when they want to be, and also a nightmare! Mark my words, I have seen both :p :heart:

This post has been edited by Tambaqui: 03 August 2009 - 09:06 PM


#13 User is offline   rugerfly 

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 08:14 PM

Tambaqui, please dont refer to all GSPs as over the top and hyperactive, Most GSP's I know are active and intelligent.
I've had four now and none have been over the top or hyperactive. :heart:

#14 User is offline   FHRP 

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 08:16 PM

View Postrugerfly, on 3rd Aug 2009 - 08:14 PM, said:

Tambaqui, please dont refer to all GSPs as over the top and hyperactive, Most GSP's I know are active and intelligent.
I've had four now and none have been over the top or hyperactive. :heart:

Here here. It must be remembered that GSPs were bred to work for their people. To have an over the top hyperactive dog is no use to any hunter.

#15 User is offline   TangerineDream 

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 08:38 PM

I would call them enthusiastic...but it can be controlled with consistent training from day 1 so that the pup understands what behaviours are acceptable in what situations...I look at Tango lying in front of the heater atm and think that 'enthusiastic' is a good word, and wanting to be around people all the time but I wouldn't call them hyperactive .

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