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Norwegian Elkhound

#1 User is offline   Troy 

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Posted 15 November 2009 - 10:16 PM

The Norwegian Elkhound

Quote

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org....ils.asp?bid=125 )

Group: Group 4 (Hounds)

General Appearance: Powerful; compact body; square outline and proud carriage; coat close and abundant but not open; upstanding pointed ears; tail tightly curled over back.

Characteristics: A hardy hunting Spitz with a bold energetic disposition.

Temperament: Friendly, intelligent and independent without any sign of nervousness.

Head And Skull: Wedge shaped, comparatively broad between ears; stop, not large; forehead and back of head slightly arched; foreface broad at root (not pinched in), evenly tapering whether seen from above or side, never pointed; bridge of nose straight and approximately the length of forehead; tight fitting skin on head, no wrinkle.

Eyes: Not prominent, slightly oval, medium size, dark brown, giving frank, fearless and friendly expression.

Ears: Set high, small, firm and erect, pointed and very mobile; slightly taller than width at base; when alert, outer edge should be vertical.

Mouth: Jaws strong with perfect, regular and complete scissor bite, i.e. the upper teeth closely overlapping the lower teeth and set square to the jaws.

Neck: Medium length, powerful, carrying the head high; a rich ruff on close fitting skin but no dewlap.

Forequarters: Legs straight with good, not coarse, bone and strong pasterns; shoulders sloping; elbows closely set in.

Body: Powerful; short, strong back; loin short and wide with very little tuck-up; chest deep and broad; well curved ribs; topline straight and level; distance from brisket to ground not less than half the height at withers.

Hindquarters: Legs firm, strong and powerful; little but definite bend at stifle and hock; straight when viewed from behind.

Feet: Comparatively small, slightly oval; tightly closed, well arched toes with protective hair between thick pads; turning neither in nor out. Nails firm and strong.

Tail: rong, set on high; thickly coated without plume; tightly curled, preferably over the centre line of back.

Gait/Movement: Demonstrates agility and endurance; stride at the trot even and effortless, back remaining level; as speed of trot increased, front and rear legs converge equally in straight lines towards a centre line beneath body.

Coat: Close, abundant, weather resistant; soft, dense, woolly undercoat and coarse, straight outer coat; short and smooth on head and front of legs, slightly longer on back of front legs, longest on neck, back of thighs and tail; not trimmed.

Colour: Grey of various shades, with black tips to out coat; lighter on chest, stomach, legs, underside of tail, buttocks and in a harness mark; ears and foreface dark; a dark line from eye to ear desirable; undercoat pure pale grey. Any pronounced variation from the grey colour, sooty colour on lower legs, spectacles or white markings undesirable.

Sizes: Ideal height:
Dogs 52 cm (20.5 ins) at shoulder
Bitches 49 cm (19.5 ins) at shoulder

Weight:
Dogs approx. 23 kg (51 lbs)
Bitches approx. 20 kg (44 lbs)

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.
Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.


See Photos of the Norwegian Elkhound

Quote

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)


If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.


See Photos of the Norwegian Elkhound

Norwegian Elkhound Breeders

Norwegian Elkhound Puppies For Sale

#2 User is offline   Norskgra 

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 08:24 AM

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I have owned Elkies for 6 years and am also a breeder and sometimes shower.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

One of the most ancient breeds, it is thousands of years old. These dogs have been by man's side since the time he hunted with slingshots. A skeleton similar to today's Norwegian Elkhound has been found dating from 4000 to 5000 BC although it is thought they may date back to 12,000BC. Historically, the dog was used in Scandinavia as a hunter of big game, especially moose ("Elg" in Norwegian) and elk. The dog can scent game from a distance of several Kilometres. He tracks the quarry and attracts its attention by barking. Then he holds the animal at bay until the hunter arrives to make the kill. Over the centuries, Elkhounds have also successfully hunted badger, lynx, mountain lion, bear, wolf, reindeer, elk and even rabbit. The Elkhounds is particularly well suited to badger hunting since he works better at night than in the daytime. It is also highly prized as a sled dog. In case of war, the Norwegian Defence Minister has the power to mobilise all privately owned Elkhounds. In more recent times, the friendly and reliable character of the Elkhound has helped win him a place in many homes as a cherished family pet. The breed was first exhibited in 1877 when the Norwegian Hunters Association began holding shows. In 1923, the

Elkhound Club was formed and the breed was officially recognised by the British Kennel Club. The Norwegian Elkhound Association of America was recognised by the AKC in about 1930. Some of the Elkhound's talents include: hunting, tracking, herding, watch dogging, guarding, sledding, and agility.

They were first introduced into Australia in 1954.

3. How common is it in Australia?

They are not that common. There are approximate;y 350 - 400 Australia wide.

4. What is the average lifespan?

The life expectancy is 12 - 15 years.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

The Norwegian Elkhound is fearless and friendly. Although some may be somewhat reserved with strangers, it will greet family and friends it knows with enthusiasm. They are reliable, energetic and alert companions for children and make sensible guard dogs. It is clean and docile with an outstanding character. They are affectionate and loyal, engaging and sensitive. Like other Arctic dogs, the Norwegian Elkhound has a mind of its own and is fairly independent. It may be somewhat resistant to obedience training. It is important to be firm with this dog but show affection as well. Puppies need firm but gentle discipline. Be fair when training this breed. You can upset the dog for a long time by punishing it unfairly, and it will let you know how it feels. They have been bred to hold prey at bay, barking constantly until the hunter arrives. Some Norwegian Elkhounds bark a great deal. They also have a tendency to roam. It is best to pair sled dogs in teams of one male and one female, as males have a tendency to fight if harnessed together. They may also be aggressive with same sex dogs in the household, but this tends to be the exception rather then the rule. Some sources say Elkhounds are usually good with non-canine pets, others say they shouldn't be trusted so use caution.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?


The Norwegian Elkhound is a very energetic dog that thrives on strenuous activity. It should have at least an hour of exercise a day. It will enjoy a run beside your bike or a really good run in the woods, but remember that these dogs like to roam. If it picks up an interesting scent, it may ignore you when you call it. Elkhounds are very aduptably and if you prefer to sit on the lounge, they are happy to sit with you.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Elkhounds can be very strong willed and independant. They need an owner who can be more determined. They are fine for first time owners as long as they are trained.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Yes, they can as long as they have some toys and things to keep themselves occupied.

9. How much grooming is required?

The hard, coarse, weatherproof coat that is self cleaning and is easy to groom. It should be brushed regularly (maybe once a week), with extra care given while the dog is shedding its dense undercoat. When the dog is shedding, the dead hair clings to the new hair. The dead hair should be removed with a rubber brush or a wooden comb with a double row of metal teeth. Brushes and combs just for this purpose are sold in pet stores. Bathe only when necessary (no more than once a month), as it removes the natural oils in the skin. Like other Arctic dogs, they do not have the usual smell of dog hair. The coat is both water and dirt resistant. This breed is a seasonally heavy shedder.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Elkhounds are great family dogs and are not too boisterous for small children or infirmed but they do need to be well trained.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

The Elkhound is a very hardy breed and luckily in Australia, we do not have many hereditary problems. There have been very few cases of Renal problems and Hip Dysplasia and very occasionally Entropian.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)


Health testing is not compulsory for Elkhounds. From discussions I have had with other breeders, there are only about three breeders that carry out any health tests. Elkhounds should be tested for HD, have their eyes tested and also their kidneys. There is no known test for Familian Renal problems but Elkhounds can hace their kidneys tested, preferably once a year to ensure that there is not any kidney problems. It is very hard to give an idea on what health testing results should be when only three, maybe 4 breeders actually carry out testing. Obviously, the lower the hip scores the better. I prefer to work on a maximum of 1:1.

This post has been edited by Norskgra: 17 November 2009 - 05:52 PM


#3 User is offline   Odin-Genie 

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 10:12 AM

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I have owned this breed for two years.

3. How common is it in Australia?

The only elkhounds I have ever seen are at the breeders or my own (and his litter mate). Most people look confused when I tell them my dog is an elkhound. He usually gets mistaken for a husky x GSD or a Keeshond. So yes, they are quite uncommon.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Stubborn. Elkies have a mind of their own and training them can be quite amusing. They usually get most of the commands fairly easily, but wouldn't always do what they are told. They are also supposed to get quite creative with their training and do interesting things to make it exciting. But on the whole, I found it much easier to train my elkhound than my golden retriever, except in recall.
Elkhounds don't do well off leash. If something exciting catches their eye, they would tend to run.
Elkhounds are extremely friendly with family and friends, though they can be a bit wary of strangers. Though my elkhound has been wary of only a few people so far. He greets most strangers well.
Elkhounds are also quite sensitive and seem to remember negative treatment. Punishment doesn't work with them. It only makes them more stubborn. One needs to be firm but gentle while training with loads of positive reinforcement. Elkhounds need to know you are the boss (though they will try their best to be the boss), but a boss who loves them.
Elkhounds don't lick much. When they lick, it's short gentle licks, not a wet slobbery lick.
Like most northern breeds they don't have a doggy smell and keep themselves clean.



6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?


An least one hour a day.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Only if the owner is willing to put in a lot of training and have enormous amounts of patience. They can be quite handful as puppies.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

I would not recommend this, though that is purely personal experience. Even though my elkhound needs some time by himself, he craves company, more than my goldy. When we brought our golden retriever puppy home, it calmed him down considerably.

9. How much grooming is required?

I brush my elkhound at least once a week. When he is shedding heavily, I brush him daily. He gets bathed at least once a month, but that's because he sleeps on the bed and furniture. So I like to keep him clean.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Elkhounds can be great family dogs, but only if the owners are willing to train and exercise the dog. Otherwise they can get destructive. They are very affectionate and gentle with children.

This post has been edited by Odin-Genie: 16 November 2009 - 10:16 AM


#4 User is offline   Bjelkier 

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 08:29 PM

View PostNorskgra, on 16th Nov 2009 - 09:24 AM, said:

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

The Norwegian Elkhound is fearless and friendly. Although some may be somewhat reserved with strangers, it will greet family and friends it knows with enthusiasm. They are reliable, energetic and alert companions for children and make sensible guard dogs. It is clean and docile with an outstanding character. They are affectionate and loyal, engaging and sensitive. Like other Arctic dogs, the Norwegian Elkhound has a mind of its own and is fairly independent. It may be somewhat resistant to obedience training. It is important to be firm with this dog but show affection as well. Puppies need firm but gentle discipline. Be fair when training this breed. You can upset the dog for a long time by punishing it unfairly, and it will let you know how it feels. They have been bred to hold prey at bay, barking constantly until the hunter arrives. Some Norwegian Elkhounds bark a great deal. They also have a tendency to roam. It is best to pair sled dogs in teams of one male and one female, as males have a tendency to fight if harnessed together. They may also be aggressive with same sex dogs in the household, but this tends to be the exception rather then the rule. Some sources say Elkhounds are usually good with non-canine pets, others say they shouldn't be trusted so use caution.


Are you able to expand on this a little?
What are they likely to do to a would be burglar?

#5 User is offline   Norskgra 

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 09:37 PM

View PostWolfsong, on 16th Nov 2009 - 08:29 PM, said:

View PostNorskgra, on 16th Nov 2009 - 09:24 AM, said:

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

The Norwegian Elkhound is fearless and friendly. Although some may be somewhat reserved with strangers, it will greet family and friends it knows with enthusiasm. They are reliable, energetic and alert companions for children and make sensible guard dogs. It is clean and docile with an outstanding character. They are affectionate and loyal, engaging and sensitive. Like other Arctic dogs, the Norwegian Elkhound has a mind of its own and is fairly independent. It may be somewhat resistant to obedience training. It is important to be firm with this dog but show affection as well. Puppies need firm but gentle discipline. Be fair when training this breed. You can upset the dog for a long time by punishing it unfairly, and it will let you know how it feels. They have been bred to hold prey at bay, barking constantly until the hunter arrives. Some Norwegian Elkhounds bark a great deal. They also have a tendency to roam. It is best to pair sled dogs in teams of one male and one female, as males have a tendency to fight if harnessed together. They may also be aggressive with same sex dogs in the household, but this tends to be the exception rather then the rule. Some sources say Elkhounds are usually good with non-canine pets, others say they shouldn't be trusted so use caution.


Are you able to expand on this a little?
What are they likely to do to a would be burglar?

They will bark to let you know that someone is around but they will probably run and hide if a burglar actually gets in. :hug: When we lived in Sydney, ours actually saved us from getting broken into by their "I mean business' bark.

#6 User is offline   Elkie1 

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 06:20 AM

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)
Show and breed Norwegian elkhound

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Information taken from my website www.halgroveelkhounds.net
The History

The Norwegian Elkhound is a very ancient breed, having been developed over 6,000 years ago to help early Scandinavians hunt big game such as moose and bear. Remains of dogs remarkably similar to the modern Elkhound have been found in grave sites such as the Viste Cave in Jæren, Norway, where they were dated as far back as 4000–5000 BC. Archaeological digs in Scandinavia suggest this breed existed and was domesticated in the Stone age. At the end of the 19th century the breed came to England, and in 1901 the The Kennel Club officially recognised it.

For many years, the Norwegian Elkhound was considered the oldest of all dog breeds, going back further than 6,000 years. Recent DNA analysis suggests, however, that several "ancient" breeds have been "recreated in more recent times from combinations of other breeds" (Ostrander et al., 2004). The researchers found "genetic evidence for a recent origin of the Norwegian Elkhound, believed to be of ancient Scandinavian origin". But this study only includes 85 of the world's more than 400 dog breeds, omits many primitive lineages, and clusters the breeds together into just four major groups called clades. Nevertheless, some researchers say that the Norwegian Elkhound is a descendant of the ancient "primitive" Pariah Dog that existed 4,000–7,000 years ago.

Of the four major clades that Ostrander et al. clusters together, Clade II includes dogs with the genetic haplotype D8 from two Scandinavian dog breeds: the Norwegian Elkhound and the Jämthund [note: a haplotype is a group of alleles of different genes on a single chromosome that are linked close enough together to be inherited as a single unit]. This genetic sequence haplotype is closely related to two wolf haplotypes found in Italy, France, Romania, and Greece, and is also related to a wolf haplotype found in western Russia (Vila et al., 1997). Clade II appears to be only seen in Norwegian breeds and exhibits a vast amount of divergences. It is suggested that this clade illustrates an ancient and independent origin from wolves that are now extinct (Raisor, 2004). The Norwegian Elkhound evolved, at least partially, from ancestral grey wolf subspecies now found in south central Europe and western Russia and may very well be one of the most ancient of all dog breeds.

In Medieval times it was known as a dyrehound or dyrehund and was highly prized as a hunting dog but rarely seen or bred outside of Norway.

The Norwegian Elkhound - A Scent Hound


The Norwegian Elkhound belongs to the collection of dogs referred to as Scent Hounds, which specialise in following the scent or the smell of its quarry. It wasn’t until the mid 1500's that hounds began to be classified according to their purpose, i.e. sight hounds, scent hounds, etc. Scent Hounds have distinctive characteristics, features and traits which are perfect for their purpose. They have large noses which have deep, open nostrils and their lips are loose and moist, designed to pick up scent particles and follow the trail of an animal. Their ears are long which concentrates the scent on the nose. Their bodies are designed for endurance, an essential asset when following any scent trail. Hunting takes different forms and as man opts for hunting their quarry either on foot or on horseback the scent hounds have been selectively bred to produce small legs, to enable a man to easily follow on foot, or longer legs suited to keep up with a man on horseback. Most scent hounds were used in packs - making a loud, deep baying noise alerting hunters to their location. As a pet the Norwegian Elkhound is intelligent, friendly and reliable.

Also noted - The elkhound under coat can also be used for bird nesting material. -first hand experience while breeding Budgies. :D


3. How common is it in Australia?
not that common in Australia

4. What is the average lifespan?
An average of 12 to 15 years. Some have lived longer.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?
Temperament and personallity based on my elkies.
Caring, energestic, intellegent, boistous, can be lazy, loyal
ETA - protective, playful, not clumsey.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?
An elkhound has a tendencey to put on weight, so exercise is a must for the elkhound. Usually excercise will suite the lyfestyle of the individual elkhound.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?
yes, if all the research and preperation for the breed has been met

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?
Yes

9. How much grooming is required?
Elkhounds blow their coat two to three times a year so grooming is requiered to keep the coat free from dead hair. Brushing also helps stimulate the natural oils in the coat giving the dog a more healthier coat. Elkhounds are self cleaning and have a water resistant coat. An elkhound has no doggy odor and requiers no clipping of any kind.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?
We had a puppy go to a family with two small boys, the puppy - now a year old sleeps with the children in their room and is very protective of them. Both boys have animal hair allergies but are fine with the Norwegian Elkhound.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?
Luckily in Austrralia, the elkie has not had many health problems. They do however get sebaceous cysts. Renal problems have also surfaces in the breed here in Australia.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)
a person should ask to see current Registration papers of both sire and dam, current medical records of both sire, dam and puppies. You should ask about the grooming, excercise, feeding, training that the puppy should require. And if the breeder is a member of the ANKC and holds a current breeders prefix.
However, I do encourage prospective puppy buyers to research the breed to see if the breed is right for them.

This post has been edited by Elkie1: 17 November 2009 - 07:02 PM


#7 User is offline   Bjelkier 

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 10:22 AM

View PostNorskgra, on 16th Nov 2009 - 10:37 PM, said:

View PostWolfsong, on 16th Nov 2009 - 08:29 PM, said:

View PostNorskgra, on 16th Nov 2009 - 09:24 AM, said:

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

The Norwegian Elkhound is fearless and friendly. Although some may be somewhat reserved with strangers, it will greet family and friends it knows with enthusiasm. They are reliable, energetic and alert companions for children and make sensible guard dogs. It is clean and docile with an outstanding character. They are affectionate and loyal, engaging and sensitive. Like other Arctic dogs, the Norwegian Elkhound has a mind of its own and is fairly independent. It may be somewhat resistant to obedience training. It is important to be firm with this dog but show affection as well. Puppies need firm but gentle discipline. Be fair when training this breed. You can upset the dog for a long time by punishing it unfairly, and it will let you know how it feels. They have been bred to hold prey at bay, barking constantly until the hunter arrives. Some Norwegian Elkhounds bark a great deal. They also have a tendency to roam. It is best to pair sled dogs in teams of one male and one female, as males have a tendency to fight if harnessed together. They may also be aggressive with same sex dogs in the household, but this tends to be the exception rather then the rule. Some sources say Elkhounds are usually good with non-canine pets, others say they shouldn't be trusted so use caution.


Are you able to expand on this a little?
What are they likely to do to a would be burglar?

They will bark to let you know that someone is around but they will probably run and hide if a burglar actually gets in. :) When we lived in Sydney, ours actually saved us from getting broken into by their "I mean business' bark.


Ah got you, sounds like what the Sammies will do, only Elkies look a bit tougher :eek:
Thanks :rofl:

#8 User is offline   Norskgra 

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 10:28 AM

View PostWolfsong, on 17th Nov 2009 - 10:22 AM, said:

Ah got you, sounds like what the Sammies will do, only Elkies look a bit tougher :cry:
Thanks :eek:

The thing about Elkhounds is that most people don't know what they are. A lot of people think they are a GSD cross because of their black mask. When you have them going berserk at the window, it is usually enough to stop people from coming in. :)

Kasper, our oldest male, is great with his I mean business' bark. He sounds very aggressive. One night while I was at work, my daughter got home from work later than usual. She turned on a torch to see her way down the path. Kasper started with his special bark and sounded scarey. My daughter unlocked the door and when she went in couldn't see Kasper. A minute or two later, he peeked around the corner and then came running to my daughter for a cuddle. :rofl:

#9 User is offline   RachelleBuck 

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 10:36 AM

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)
My inlaws have owned Elkies for almost 20 years. With the 2 they have at the moment we are in a part ownership agreement. They house them and daily exercise them, I obedience train them and groom them.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?
I think everyone else has answered this question really well so I wont go into it.

3. How common is it in Australia?
Not very. Can not say I have ever ran into another Elkie in the street. When we saw them being show at the Pet and Animal Expo a couple of years ago we almost fell over ourselfs.

4. What is the average lifespan?
As everyone has said 12 to 15 years. They inlaws did have a girl, Jenny, that lived till 17 but also lost one of their last ones at 9 years.
5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?
They enjoy a walk of about 1 hour a day but if you miss a day they are not too stressed. They more enjoy getting out a sniffing the world than the walk itself.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?
They really are a wash and wear dog from what I have seen of them. Ours are great with kids and just take what ever life throws at them. Really reccommend training them in obedience a bit though

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?
Yes. As long as they have a bed to sleep in they are happy.

9. How much grooming is required?
Not much. It is really only at the end of winter that they require a fair bit of grooming. But there coat clumps and can be pulled out.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)? If you let them walk all over you they will. They are gentle with kids though.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of? Not that we have come across

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)
To look at the paperwork of the sir and dam. See the registration papers of pup and see that the breeder is registered with the ANKC.

#10 User is offline   dee lee 

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 12:01 PM

What are they like with other dogs?
Are they gregarious or do they have a tendency to ignore them?

#11 User is offline   Norskgra 

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 12:04 PM

View Post✽deelee, on 17th Nov 2009 - 12:01 PM, said:

What are they like with other dogs?
Are they gregarious or do they have a tendency to ignore them?

We have a HamiltonStovare and we used to have a Kelpie cross. When we lived in Sydney, we used to rescue Elkounds and Elkhound crosses. We never had a problem with any of the dogs getting on. They play with the Hamilton and would play and sometimes ignore the others. We also have a cat and we have never had a problem with them and the cat either. When they are pups, they try to play with the cat but normally they just ignore him.

This post has been edited by Norskgra: 17 November 2009 - 12:05 PM


#12 User is offline   dee lee 

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 12:21 PM

View PostNorskgra, on 17th Nov 2009 - 01:04 PM, said:

View Post✽deelee, on 17th Nov 2009 - 12:01 PM, said:

What are they like with other dogs?
Are they gregarious or do they have a tendency to ignore them?

We have a HamiltonStovare and we used to have a Kelpie cross. When we lived in Sydney, we used to rescue Elkounds and Elkhound crosses. We never had a problem with any of the dogs getting on. They play with the Hamilton and would play and sometimes ignore the others. We also have a cat and we have never had a problem with them and the cat either. When they are pups, they try to play with the cat but normally they just ignore him.



Sigh... Just another breed to add to my wish list... :)


Who would they not be suited to?

#13 User is offline   Norskgra 

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 12:28 PM

View Post✽deelee, on 17th Nov 2009 - 01:21 PM, said:

Sigh... Just another breed to add to my wish list... :)


Who would they not be suited to?

They would not be suitable to people who are not prepared to give them some training. Personally, I would be hesitant in selling a male to an elderly person, purely because the males can be very head strong as well as physically strong.

#14 User is offline   mersonmalinois 

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 01:26 PM

View PostElkie1, on 17th Nov 2009 - 06:20 AM, said:

View PostNorskgra, on 16th Nov 2009 - 09:24 AM, said:

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)[/b]

Health testing is not compulsory for Elkhounds. There are only about three breeders that carry out any health tests. Elkhounds should be tested for HD, have their eyes tested and also their kidneys. There is no known test for Familian Renal problems but Elkhounds can hace their kidneys tested, preferably once a year to ensure that there is not any kidney problems. It is very hard to give an idea on what health testing results should be when only three, maybe 4 breeders actually carry out testing. Obviously, the lower the hip scores the better. I prefer to work on a maximum of 1:1. A few breeders say that they have never had any problems but how do you know if the dogs have not been tested and also why wait until there is a problem?


This statement is a bit harsh don't you think? Where is the proof that only 3 maybe 4 breeders do testing? :mad :o
with this statement, you are publicly attacking other fellow elkhound breeders - This is a public forum :mad


Are you serious elkie1? Norskgra didn't attack anyone. She was letting people know that some breeders don't test and that is a VERY important point to share with prospective puppy buyers/Elkhound fanciers. Telling the truth isn't "harsh".

I think Norskgra should be thanked for sharing this information. ;)

#15 User is offline   Elkie1 

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 05:25 PM

View Postmersonmalinois, on 17th Nov 2009 - 02:26 PM, said:

View PostElkie1, on 17th Nov 2009 - 06:20 AM, said:

View PostNorskgra, on 16th Nov 2009 - 09:24 AM, said:

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)[/b]

Health testing is not compulsory for Elkhounds. There are only about three breeders that carry out any health tests. Elkhounds should be tested for HD, have their eyes tested and also their kidneys. There is no known test for Familian Renal problems but Elkhounds can hace their kidneys tested, preferably once a year to ensure that there is not any kidney problems. It is very hard to give an idea on what health testing results should be when only three, maybe 4 breeders actually carry out testing. Obviously, the lower the hip scores the better. I prefer to work on a maximum of 1:1. A few breeders say that they have never had any problems but how do you know if the dogs have not been tested and also why wait until there is a problem?


This statement is a bit harsh don't you think? Where is the proof that only 3 maybe 4 breeders do testing? :) :laugh:
with this statement, you are publicly attacking other fellow elkhound breeders - This is a public forum :)


Are you serious elkie1? Norskgra didn't attack anyone. She was letting people know that some breeders don't test and that is a VERY important point to share with prospective puppy buyers/Elkhound fanciers. Telling the truth isn't "harsh".

I think Norskgra should be thanked for sharing this information. :bottom:


We'll in that case, maybe she should have wrote "To my knowledge"

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