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When Dog Is Not Interested In Food, Pats Or Toy As Reward? What would you do?

#1 User is offline   Beaglelover:) 

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 07:35 PM

It is very rare that I come across this, but a friend asked for some help on how to choose the right reward for training her dog when the dog clearly hasnt got any motivation for food, verbal praise, pats or toys.

The dog is a very fussy eater as a result of eating human food:rolleyes: and will not go near any dog treats. She has tried warmed chicken etc for food rewards but the dog doesnt seem to interested.

When I say interested, the dog will eat it,but in dog training from my knowledge it should be of highest value to the dog and something the dog wants to work for.

She just wants to do the basics of sit, stay, down etc, and the reward needs to be readily available and easy to use. I have told her that the reward must only come out when in training.

Is there anything out there that is irresistible for dogs or any training secrets that have worked for a fussy eater, that isnt too hard to prepare and can be easy to handle ? I am sure the dog will work for raw meat etc, however that is quite messy.

Any tips or tricks would be great!! :(

#2 User is offline   persephone 

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 07:42 PM

maybe try THIS to start with? use any food the dog really craves.

That may get the cogs turning..before actual 'training' can begin..maybe.

it's a bit odd that food/attention/pats do not work.....

#3 User is offline   Beaglelover:) 

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 07:57 PM

View Postpersephone, on 22nd Dec 2009 - 08:42 PM, said:

maybe try THIS to start with? use any food the dog really craves.

That may get the cogs turning..before actual 'training' can begin..maybe.

it's a bit odd that food/attention/pats do not work.....


WOW! That is a very detailed, I will need some more time to decode everything in that article for her, but thank you very much :D

I dont really like pats and praise as a reward on its own, as I believe it takes a lot longer to train the dog if not paired with food. Then you have the problem of not been able to praise or pat the dog out of training if you want quick results.

So even though the dog is a fussy eater I am sure there is something out there that works as a high motivating reward. :confused:

This post has been edited by Beaglelover:): 22 December 2009 - 08:01 PM


#4 User is offline   kitty 

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 08:00 PM

just a question - how old is the pup, and where are they attempting to give these treats - at home, or with distractions?

My girl Molly had a lot of difficulty when she was older at puppy school - no matter WHAT we gave her, she wouldn't accept it - regardless of the value, steak, roast chicken etc. At home, she would train for kibble.... but once outside of the house, nothing. Because we weren't allowed squeaky toys at puppy school we used lots of very very happy praise and a pat.

Once she was around 6 months, she started accepting food as treats. Maybe it's a desensitizing issue?

We also didn't feed Molly the day or night before training, and only gave her the lowest value food at home.

Also, my other question is the dog allowed to free range feed during the day? If it needs to work for it's regular food, instead of having it left out for the dog to graze on, that might affect the dog's ability to work for food as well.

I'm not sure if this is relevant to your situation, and i really don't know all that much, but thought i would share my experience with a dog that refused food whilst training. :confused:

#5 User is offline   persephone 

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 08:11 PM

Quote

I dont really like pats and praise as a reward on its own,


and I have never trained using food :confused:

I have trained guide dogs, therapy dogs, and pet dogs.. no food. Mind you, I have not ever done competitive obedience or anything like that.. I hate having to have food with me all the time.A sincere word of praise, and a chin scritch- I have them always with me :D

#6 User is offline   Beaglelover:) 

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 08:13 PM

View Postkitty, on 22nd Dec 2009 - 09:00 PM, said:

just a question - how old is the pup, and where are they attempting to give these treats - at home, or with distractions?

My girl Molly had a lot of difficulty when she was older at puppy school - no matter WHAT we gave her, she wouldn't accept it - regardless of the value, steak, roast chicken etc. At home, she would train for kibble.... but once outside of the house, nothing. Because we weren't allowed squeaky toys at puppy school we used lots of very very happy praise and a pat.

Once she was around 6 months, she started accepting food as treats. Maybe it's a desensitizing issue?

We also didn't feed Molly the day or night before training, and only gave her the lowest value food at home.

Also, my other question is the dog allowed to free range feed during the day? If it needs to work for it's regular food, instead of having it left out for the dog to graze on, that might affect the dog's ability to work for food as well.

I'm not sure if this is relevant to your situation, and i really don't know all that much, but thought i would share my experience with a dog that refused food whilst training. :confused:


Thanks for your reply. While she is taking the dog for a walk she stops off at the park and does some training, so the training is away from a comfortable setting of the house. I guess it could be stress related, but I think it is more a factor of getting human food at dinner time without working for it.

The dog is 3. Not sure if food is taken away straight after feeding.

I will let her know not to feed her dog its daily meal until after training and I have tried to tell her about human food being a big no no.

#7 User is offline   persephone 

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 08:15 PM

There will be 3 years of bad habits to chisel away... both for the dog and owner ....

#8 User is offline   Beaglelover:) 

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 08:18 PM

View Postpersephone, on 22nd Dec 2009 - 09:11 PM, said:

Quote

I dont really like pats and praise as a reward on its own,


and I have never trained using food :D

I have trained guide dogs, therapy dogs, and pet dogs.. no food. Mind you, I have not ever done competitive obedience or anything like that.. I hate having to have food with me all the time.A sincere word of praise, and a chin scritch- I have them always with me :rofl:


Yes, I have seen Assistance Dog use only verbal rewards too and it sure does work. Can I ask, how long does it take for your guys to catch on with just pats and praise? I do know the Assistance Dogs train for 18 months or something.

My friend really just wants the fastest way to train her dog, lets say she is a little bit lazy and doesnt have much time :confused:

This post has been edited by Beaglelover:): 22 December 2009 - 08:19 PM


#9 User is offline   EISHUND 

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 08:21 PM

I praise with my voice! :confused:

#10 User is offline   persephone 

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 08:21 PM

IMO- the dog's willingness and desire to please dictates the training time.


:confused:

#11 User is offline   poodlefan 

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 08:22 PM

The best reward for a dog is the one that WORKS.

I'd have to see this hander/dog for myself. I've heard the "not interested" story before and frankly sometimes its more about the handler than the motivator/reward.

Is the dog overfed? Overindulged? Accustomed to getting pretty much its own way without effort on its part?

#12 User is offline   persephone 

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 08:22 PM

l

Quote

ets say she is a little bit lazy and doesnt have much time embarrass.gif


Well, it will probably take a looong time . and/or have unsatisfactory results.

:confused:

#13 User is offline   Beaglelover:) 

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 08:23 PM

View Postpersephone, on 22nd Dec 2009 - 09:21 PM, said:

IMO- the dog's willingness and desire to please dictates the training time.


:D



Hmmm yes that is the problem the dog doesnt need to please and doesnt have much willingness to learn, as for the last three years it has been getting a 3 course meal for free :confused:

My I add... I am trying to help a friend who doesnt really want to change her ways and add with that a very stubborn Staffy who gets very distracted and needs more then just voice for focus/control.

This post has been edited by Beaglelover:): 22 December 2009 - 08:30 PM


#14 User is offline   Steve 

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 08:24 PM

Its not a Maremma is it?

#15 User is offline   Beaglelover:) 

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 08:31 PM

View PostSteve, on 22nd Dec 2009 - 09:24 PM, said:

Its not a Maremma is it?


No a Staffy, why do you ask?

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