Australian Pure Bred Dog Forums - Dogz Online: Sbts Fighting - Australian Pure Bred Dog Forums - Dogz Online

Jump to content

  • 3 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Sbts Fighting

#1 User is offline   tesslc 

  • Forum Member
  • Posts: 62
  • Joined: 06-May 14
  • State:QLD

Posted 22 July 2014 - 08:40 AM

Hi all

Some of you know I have two SBTs - male and female. They had pups 9 weeks ago and immediately after there were a couple of minor scraps when dad got between mum and the whelping room. I wasn't too concerned as I figured it was mums natural instinct. It stopped when the pups were old enough to be introduced to dad.

Now they have had quite a few serious fights over food. Before they had pups they would eat out of each other's bowls. Now they dagger fighting when I am getting their food ready.

We still have one pup he will be going to his new home in August. I don't know whether that us causing a problem or if it's the girl trying to assert dominance but she's ended up with 7 punctures in her face this morning.

Obviously I will keep them separate while getting their food but I'm concerned this is going to escalate further.

Any ideas.

#2 User is offline   Simply Grand 

  • aka Saxonpup
  • Posts: 3,281
  • Joined: 29-October 09
  • State:NSW

Posted 22 July 2014 - 08:57 AM

I think your best bet is to get a good behaviourist to come and look at them personally. You've got a few complications going on with the pups, your girl becoming a mum and also that she would have been coming into maturity anyway. Given the seriousness of the fight this morning I don't think it's worth the risk of trying to figure out what's happening without seeing them :(

#3 User is offline   Little Gifts 

  • Shar Pei Diem
  • Posts: 7,853
  • Joined: 07-March 10
  • Location:Beenleigh, QLD
  • State:QLD

Posted 22 July 2014 - 09:01 AM

Keep them separated by secure doors or gates and out of eye sight until you get this sorted. You and your dogs don't need to be dealing with fights and vet visits. And also feed the dogs in order of dominance in the pack to reinforce that. Google Gesture Eating too and give that a try in the interim. In a pack situation the Alphas (that's you) eat first and they eat as much as they want. They then decide who eats next (in order of heirachy) and how much they get so gesture eating is designed to reinforce that there is no competition for food between the lower dogs, that food comes only from the alpha so there is no point scrapping amongst themselves for food. It is simple and quick to do.

Others with the right knowledge will be able to tell you why this might be happening but you now have three dogs - two of them are males and the older male doesn't know the younger male is going to a new home and he just might be letting this young one know he is top dog and not to bother trying anything. Edited to add - even though your male has fought with your female this could still be linked to him feeling potentially challenged by another male and wanting to give both dogs the idea he is still the strongest after the alpha.

This post has been edited by Little Gifts: 22 July 2014 - 09:04 AM


#4 User is offline   fbaudry 

  • Forum Regular
  • Posts: 928
  • Joined: 04-July 08
  • Location:Sydney
  • State:NSW

Posted 22 July 2014 - 09:05 AM

I'd really recommend you get professional help from a proper behaviourist..

Personally, I'd highly recommend Gaille Perry as a behaviourist veterinarian. It will cost you a bit of money but I really believe getting an appointment with her (or someone she works with) is the best way forward. They'll be able to recommend you a behavioural trainer who can help you assess the situation, implement management strategies and look into behaviour modification training.

Please, stay clear of franchises and unqualified trainers. There is an awful lot of cowboys out there...

In the meantime, I would separate the 3 of them before you even start preparing their food, and obviously feed them all separately.

The 2 adults are just getting out of puppyhood and reaching social maturity, showing their "true colours". Your girl would have had a awful lot of hormonal changes over the past few months too.
I'd be super cautious there's nothing else lying around that could trigger resource guarding (chew toys, sticks etc...) and keep them separate when you aren't around to supervise.

#5 User is offline   mita 

  • Forum Regular
  • Posts: 22,599
  • Joined: 26-August 04
  • Location:Brisbane
  • State:QLD

Posted 22 July 2014 - 09:09 AM

View Postfbaudry, on 22 July 2014 - 09:05 AM, said:



Personally, I'd highly recommend Gaille Perry as a behaviourist veterinarian. It will cost you a bit of money but I really believe getting an appointment with her (or someone she works with) is the best way forward. They'll be able to recommend you a behavioural trainer who can help you assess the situation, implement management strategies and look into behaviour modification training.

Please, stay clear of franchises and unqualified trainers. There is an awful lot of cowboys out there...




I'd second that recommendation. Gaille Perry used to be in Qld... & was on the staff at the University of Qld. When a Brisbane children's hospital first introduced pet therapy dogs, it was Gaille Perry who was selected to do the sensitive work of screening, selecting & training dogs and owners. Only the best behaviorist would do in that situation...

#6 User is offline   Staffyluv 

  • Ziggy
  • Posts: 15,854
  • Joined: 29-January 04
  • Location:Quangers NSW
  • State:NSW

Posted 22 July 2014 - 09:11 AM

You need professional help as already suggested. The sooner the better.

Don't ever feed them near each other until this is sorted (if it ever is)..

Personally, I wouldn't be leaving any resources around that could cause a scrap between them - toys, bones or food/treats.

I would also be keeping the pup out of harms way - the last thing you want is a pup in the middle of warring SBTs

#7 User is offline   BC Crazy 

  • Sonny, my beautiful Nahrof boy...
  • Posts: 4,491
  • Joined: 25-October 10
  • Location:Port Stephen's
  • State:NSW

Posted 22 July 2014 - 09:16 AM

I would totally separate them from each other & get professional help ASAP.

#8 User is offline   persephone 

  • Shutter-click Addict
  • Posts: 42,614
  • Joined: 09-July 03
  • Location:the maze of my mind
  • State:SA

Posted 22 July 2014 - 10:43 AM

Hope the professional assistance can be of help . Nasty and very dangerous behaviours :(

#9 User is offline   tesslc 

  • Forum Member
  • Posts: 62
  • Joined: 06-May 14
  • State:QLD

Posted 22 July 2014 - 12:19 PM

Thanks guys - I will look into options available in our area. My girl is going in to be spayed on Thursday and will have to be kept seperate from the other dogs for a few days. I figure it is a mix of hormones, her growing up, and having another dog in the house.

The strange thing is it is her that starts the fights. She starts biting the boy's face, witout growling, but in an aggressive manner. The first few times, you could tell he was very reluctant to snap back at her, but this morning he was obviously over it, because he was a lot more agressive. :confused:

They are completely seperate during the day, so it will just be a matter of keeping them seperate in the evenings until we get it sorted.

#10 User is offline   BC Crazy 

  • Sonny, my beautiful Nahrof boy...
  • Posts: 4,491
  • Joined: 25-October 10
  • Location:Port Stephen's
  • State:NSW

Posted 22 July 2014 - 01:03 PM

They don't call them 'bitches' for nothing :laugh: I always found girls to be more territorial & aggressive than any boy I have had.

#11 User is offline   Staff'n'Toller 

  • ~ Free Agent ~
  • Posts: 9,990
  • Joined: 16-August 04
  • Location:Melbs..
  • State:VIC

Posted 22 July 2014 - 02:48 PM

Thirds for Dr Gaille Perry and she has lots of personal multi dog household experience as well. :thumbsup:

#12 User is offline   WreckitWhippet 

  • Forum Regular
  • Posts: 31,553
  • Joined: 07-January 05
  • State:NSW

Posted 22 July 2014 - 03:51 PM

You may well find that they can never be left alone together again. Even with professional help, the best you are going to do is manage the situation and put measures in place to avoid conflict. An SBT bitch that has decided for whatever reason to fight can no longer be trusted with another dog.

Dogs posture and carry on, the signs with bitches are generally far more subtle, watch for them laying their ears flatter, twitching, licking lips, staring etc.

#13 User is offline   hankdog 

  • Forum Regular
  • Posts: 1,435
  • Joined: 24-February 12
  • State:NSW

Posted 22 July 2014 - 04:35 PM

Check through Nekhbets posts, she wrote something a while ago about how her dogs primary bond is with her and then with each other, I think it was in regards to introducing a new dog into the pack.
Triangle of temptation is pinned in the training and obedience section courtesy of Steve Courtney, K9Pro.
I find it quite effortful to be "dominant" but pretty easy to be the dispenser of all the good stuff. Jake gets the royal canin french bulldog food mostly because its quite big and moist and apparently tasty enough to be worth working for. You can go through a quick 5 minute training session instead of bowl feeding your dog, you should probably separate them anyway but making them work for food that only comes from you gives them a whole different attitude. Just stuff you can start on while you wait for a trainer.

#14 User is offline   Haredown Whippets 

  • The DOLer formally known as Poodlefan
  • Posts: 4,304
  • Joined: 09-December 11
  • State:ACT

Posted 22 July 2014 - 09:17 PM

View Posthankdog, on 22 July 2014 - 04:35 PM, said:

Check through Nekhbets posts, she wrote something a while ago about how her dogs primary bond is with her and then with each other, I think it was in regards to introducing a new dog into the pack.
Triangle of temptation is pinned in the training and obedience section courtesy of Steve Courtney, K9Pro.
I find it quite effortful to be "dominant" but pretty easy to be the dispenser of all the good stuff. Jake gets the royal canin french bulldog food mostly because its quite big and moist and apparently tasty enough to be worth working for. You can go through a quick 5 minute training session instead of bowl feeding your dog, you should probably separate them anyway but making them work for food that only comes from you gives them a whole different attitude. Just stuff you can start on while you wait for a trainer.


I wouldn't be starting on anything without a professional consult. What the OP needs is to manage these dogs to prevent any chance of biffo - completely. That means keepig the two dogs separate at all times. This is a pack issue, not a "training" issue IMO.

Trying to bust up a fight between these two will be difficult and dangerous - for owner and dogs. SBTs may be not be quick to anger but once in fight mode they are tenacious. It is virtually impossible for one person to separate two dogs hell bent on bloodshed and I doubt the OP wants to place his/her family members at risk helping.

I suspect there is a lot more going on here than competition for food. The dynamic between the two dogs has changed. I'd not be delaying calling in decent help.

This post has been edited by Haredown Whippets: 22 July 2014 - 09:18 PM


#15 User is offline   OSoSwift 

  • Wished I was Wilbooked
  • Posts: 14,298
  • Joined: 18-April 08
  • Location:South East WA
  • State:WA

Posted 23 July 2014 - 12:06 AM

Agree with Wreck it. Bitches are bitches and they don't let it go!

Share this topic:


  • 3 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users


Privacy Policy | Web Site Terms and Conditions