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melzawelza

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About melzawelza

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  1. Looks like the post has been deleted, can anyone who saw it fill us in?
  2. Crosses, even F1 crosses, can be extremely varied in appearance. It's why visual breed idenitification of mixed breed dogs is typically little more than chance, even when we're talking about dog professionals. Halfway down this blog you'll see some great pictures from a 1965 study by Scott & Fuller of the huge variation in appearance of mixed breed dogs and their subsequent progeny. It's a great example of the folly of visual breed identification! https://animalfarmfoundation.blog/2016/02/08/breed-labels-when-guesses-turn-into-predictions/
  3. Most vets in my area ( Sydney Suburban) charge what your current vet does, but the vet I go to is like your old one. About $60 for a consult, no charge for follow up consults on the same issue, meds are cheap as anything and only doled out as much as you need - one of my cats needed some scourban for 2 days and instead of selling me a bottle like most would he filled up four syringes from the giant bottle he has and just charged me for that amount. Sadly, I think vets like him are few and far between.
  4. As the others said it's really variable and dependent on breed, who you go with, the policy, if you have multiple pets with them etc. I pay about $65 per month (was about $45 when I first insured her but there was a hike a couple of years ago). She's covered up to about $12k from memory per condition per year, with a $150 excess for each condition. They pay the rest. Once she's over 8 they cover 80%, and once she's over 10 they cover 65%.
  5. I claimed $5.5k worth of treatment for my dog last year from PetPlan with no questions asked. I've definitely come out ahead over the years but I don't expect to - that's not how insurance works. Most years I don't claim on my car or house insurance but I'm glad I have it. The cost is well worth the peace of mind I had in saying 'do whatever is needed' when my dog was in a critical condition after an accident. I can't imagine the added stress of having to worry about the cost to treat her.
  6. My dog is left alone 11 hours a day on work days and I work full time. I walk her a few times a week and play games/do tricks with her. She's lazy as and is quite happy with this. Soon a life change will mean she has a lot less alone time which is wondeful and I'm really pleased about, but her current situation is just fine for her. All dogs are individuals - many wouldn't cope with the life your dog or my dog leads - but if our dogs cope, are happy, are not showing any signs of distress or behavioural issues then no one has any right to judge. People will also m
  7. Their problem is their numbers and the level of training and staff experience. From memory they have capacity for around 600 dogs when full and when I was there over Christmas they'd put makeshift kennels in the training shed so they could board even more dogs. Problem is this wasn't on sealed concrete and had no exercise yard attached or appropriate ventilation, so the smell in there was absolutely eye-watering (those poor dogs) and they weren't getting the level of exercise they were supposed to. People would pay $20 or $40 per day extra for their dogs to socialise in 'playtime plus' but
  8. Shane you sound like such a great prospective dog owner! Any pup you bring in to your life will be a very lucky dog indeed. I echo the others re 2 at the same time not being a great idea, and it's great you're having a further think on that. Good luck!
  9. Awesome work!! He's gorgeous! You can periodically reward him for calm behaviour while he's there - going and giving him a (gentle and calm) pat, giving him a treat, and just speaking lovely nice happy rewarding gentle words to him while he's there. You'll get there!
  10. Ex Hanrob employee and trainer here. Absolutely would not recommend sending your dog there. I do agree with Corvus's comments though that good board/train facilities can be really great for giving you a kick start, as long as you understand that unless you put in the work once they're home they'll just go right back to how they were. If you're looking for a board & train option in Sydney that will actually look after your dog (my experiences at Hanrob leave me to never trust a dog will be looked after properly), send him to Pet Resorts at Dural. Added bonus is all their trainers ac
  11. When I get new foster pups they're always tethered to their bed or crated when inside for at least a few weeks. Then they start to get more (supervised) freedom while continuing to reinforce the 'place' command to keep them on their bed when I need to. Try putting his bed next to your couch and then use his lead around the foot of the couch to tether him there. Reward reward reward while he's there and calm. Ignore if he spazzes out. Start with short periods then build up the length of time. When you start taking the tether up train him 'place' or 'on your bed' or whatever cue you
  12. I'm obsessed with dogs being lean and fit and am often trying to get people to drop some weight off their dogs and I agree, this dog is emaciated.
  13. I think it's likely the cone as others have suggested! It's really distressing for a lot of dogs. Mine was really rattled by the sound of it banging on doorframes etc and ended up just standing still and not moving as much as possible to avoid it. Different dog.
  14. No issues at all for what you're describing there - if you've got a breed-specific community then absolutely makes sense to advertise the dog for rehoming to those who are probably most likely to want it as well as the wider community. But that's different to asking a Tibbie rescue to take on every single pet Tibbie in the country that already has a current owner trying to rehome it themselves. I know the suggestion from people often comes from a good place of wanting a rescue to find the dog a 'good home' but the reality is pet owners can do just that themselves without burdening rescue gr
  15. Just a comment on the advice to people rehoming their dogs that I keep seeing crop up - to try and get rescues to take on their dog. I don't understand this suggestion. Rescues are limited in space and focus on dogs in pounds at immediate risk of euthanasia. There is no reason why people can't rehome their own dogs (different if they are on a big time crunch or some sort of urgent situation has come up). We should be encouraging people to take responsibility for their own dogs and do everything in their power to rehome them themselves. Rescue is a last resort and has no space or ability to
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