Bushriver

Breeders
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About Bushriver

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  • Gender
    Male

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  • Location
    WA

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  1. If you think he is well otherwise, I'd vary his diet a bit. If he likes something mixed in his dry, there's no harm in doing so. He could be trying it on just to get a more interesting meal, but I believe a varied diet is beneficial. Change things up a bit. No harm done in my opinion.
  2. You sound like a lovely caring home and the pup you get will be very lucky. It's great to plan ahead, but be open to going with the flow. Depending on your pups individual personality you may need to slow down on the socialisation if they are not coping. It sounds like you are going to spend a lot of time together so will get to know eachother reasonably quickly. Read your pups body language and mood and you will know whether they are up for a new experience or if they just need to chill out for the day. You've heard this a lot now, but I would also recommend not getting two pups at the same time. If you are really worried about the age gap being a problem, why not get one and make sure it is everything you expected and you are coping.? You could still get another even just a year later. I would expect Your breed to still be quite puppyish at 1 and you would have had time to bond with the first before the new pup arrives.
  3. Yes. Nothing showed up.
  4. I have a lactating bitch with a litter of five who are almost three weeks old. In the last week she has developed bald patches mainly on her hind legs and lower half of her back. Vet thinks it is a hormonal response. Has anyone else had this problem? Anything I can do for her? She is on a good quality diet and is healthy otherwise. She has good body condition and the rest of her coat is nice and shiny.
  5. September is going to be a great month for puppy Spam. We have a litter of yellow labs due on the 6th. Hoping for a keeper from this litter so extra exciting for me!!
  6. I can't vouch for all labs obviously, but I now own 6. Ranging in age from 6years to 5 months. I wouldn't say that one of them is hyper. They are happy to go for a walk as often and as far as I would like, but if not they just hang around and snooze. They are great inside and none of them ever mouth. I found all of them easy to train, and really have never owned a breed as easy to have around. I really can't understand people that have such problems with their labs. I have one boy who chewed a bit, but grew out of it at 18months and none of them dig. I do spend quite a bit of time with them, but I do see them as quite an "easy" dog.
  7. I somewhat agree. It can be very hard to get a start I. The dog world today. I've been lucky to find some very kind and encouraging people. I think those that are so against others wanting to breed are a bit insecure? In my opinion eventually the breeders that are passionate and doing the right thing will always come out on top on the end. Word of mouth will soon be the end of those that don't. Of course you want to find the best homes for your pups or dogs, but surely encouraging those that are keen to do the right thing can only end up being better for the breed. Fresh ideas, widening the gene pool, more friends with common goals?
  8. Why are standards so general and open to interpretation? Why not have actual measurements and angles to work by? As mentioned above a "long" neck could mean anything. Breeders could end up with giraffe necks because that's what the standard says!?
  9. I feel the responsibility lies with breeders mostly. They need to actually breed for the betterment of the breed, not to win in the show ring or appeal to the pet fashion at the time. That requires bravery and confidence. Judges also need to take some responsibility as they have a big impact on the changes in dogs, due to what is winning in the ring.
  10. I think it's more importantly the individual dog that you choose as well as the breed. I couldn't go past a lab in your situation. I have five of them and they interact beautifully with my four children. My youngest child is only two and I can have the whole pack out playing with her within any of them knocking her over etc. Of course this has come through training and selecting the temperament that I like. Labs are also one of the breeds that genuinely enjoy children's affections.
  11. Yes. I did send her back. Her breeder was very good about it, although she didn't think there was a problem, it's not something I was comfortable with. Especially as she was to be a show and breeding prospect, but even so, having her on the farm with all the dust and grass etc. would have been uncomfortable for her. Very happy with my new pup.
  12. I can't remember answering g this question, but would it not just be that dominant will suppress recessive?
  13. Well, he's decided just to do it on his own. Now trotting along (still needs work of course) on a loose lead and feeling happy about it all
  14. Thanks everyone. I don't take him on long walks on leash as such. It's more on leash for training sessions, practicing circles and up and backs. We walk with the other dogs off leash around the farm. He is quite playful and energetic then so I might try some leash training with the other dogs creating a bit of enthusiasm. I love his laid back personality so I wouldn't change it for the world, but hopefully I can teach him to put on a show when needed!
  15. I have them and have found them to be good quality.