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shmoo

Attention All People In Rescue

39 posts in this topic

Almost need a degree for it, or a course in temperment testing.

There should be. It would prevent people looking at a photo and getting it stuck in their head that the dog is just wonderful yet misunderstood.

Too many people look at photo of a sad dog and get sucked in because it "looks like such a lovely dog".. what the?? A photo tells you NOTHING of a dog.

Too often dogs are rescued with an assessment that is so heavily based on emotions instead of actual knowledge... especially the people expected to foster the dog..... when homechecks are NOT done and transport people or foster carers are given completely false information (or completely fluffed up information in order to get them to take the dog) it is TOTALLY unacceptable. Fosters should NEVER be put in the situation of feeling bad about a dog they can't handle or contain (when fences have never been checked or if they have little kids, work full time etc) and transport people should NEVER be held responsible for having to make a decision to take a dog back to the pound because of the stuff ups and lies passed on by the people who organise a release.

Good post Shmoo!

hear hear

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I'm so glad I don't foster care anymore. Seeing some of the stuff that goes on between groups is enough to make me run a mile.

It's all so complicated now. Almost need a degree for it, or a course in temperment testing.

Your stuff looks good though Schmoo :)

Not everyone that fosters needs to know about how to test a dog. But every organisation needs to have people that do know how to do it, and there needs to be good communication between those people and the foster carers.

I would hate for anyone to be put off foster caring by your post. Foster caring may not be for everyone, but we have plenty of carers that find it really enjoyable and worthwhile. Having the correct procedures in place (to prevent the horrible things happenning that Cordelia mentions), actually make things a whole lot less complicated than groups taking short cuts and not following procedures.

You don't need any special skills to be a foster carer when you are with a group that will give you the right support. :D

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I'm so glad I don't foster care anymore. Seeing some of the stuff that goes on between groups is enough to make me run a mile.

It's all so complicated now. Almost need a degree for it, or a course in temperment testing.

Your stuff looks good though Schmoo :)

Not everyone that fosters needs to know about how to test a dog. But every organisation needs to have people that do know how to do it, and there needs to be good communication between those people and the foster carers.

I would hate for anyone to be put off foster caring by your post. Foster caring may not be for everyone, but we have plenty of carers that find it really enjoyable and worthwhile. Having the correct procedures in place (to prevent the horrible things happenning that Cordelia mentions), actually make things a whole lot less complicated than groups taking short cuts and not following procedures.

You don't need any special skills to be a foster carer when you are with a group that will give you the right support. :D

I don't think I was with the right groups then :D To those prospective foster carers reading this thread, don't let my post put you off, just research the Rescue Groups you're interested in first and ask questions. If answers aren't forthcoming and/or you get the impression you are being treated like a Mushroom, get the hell out of there. It is a big pain in the butt and the hip pocket to get used and then cut off for reasons you'll never be told.

(The above does not relate to anything or anyone I have been involved with or been a part of in the last six months)

Edited by ryally

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shmoo   
You don't need any special skills to be a foster carer when you are with a group that will give you the right support. :)

That's exactly right. But unfortunately there are many groups out there who do not offer enough or the right type of support.

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"I believe that I have seen instances of this first hand where a dog's fate has been all but sealed due to what I can only deem to be ignorance of the breed that is being assessed. "

Unfortunately this happens even when people are supposed to be the experts. At a pound where I was a volunteer dog walker, we had the most beautiful big black Newfoundland X. She was a gorgeous dog, but was rehomed inappropriately, jumped a fence and attacked another dog. She was returned and euthanised because, according to one of the vets, she was "kennel crazy" because she chased the flashing reflection caused by the sun catching one of the walker's watch. :mad:eek: . How many happily homed, totally sane and much loved dogs chase reflections?

As one poster said, it can be very difficult to assess a dog's temperament in a pound situation, but of course it has to be attempted.

The main thing, which has been stressed again and again, is that a rescue group must be able to support and guide a foster carer and both the foster carer and the rescue group should have a good understanding of what is required from both parties.

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musik   
There have been some incidents recently that have really highlighted to me just how disordered and muddled rescue can be. The bombardment of appeals never lets up and keeps many rescuers in a constant state of emergency, rushing to retrieve dogs and rushing to place them, in a frantic effort to keep pace.

Here a some important points to remember:

Great post shmoo. I've been thinking of doing foster caring once our fences get sorted out, I'd also like a copy of your book as there is so much to know. Much like fostering a human I suspect! :laugh:

What would be your recommendations on finding a reputable rescue group to get involved with?

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shmoo   
shmoo... how is the book coming along?

Cheers

H

um slow :( basically ive got everything written down, i just have to read over it, edit and chuck a few things in, throw some things out.

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Tatelina   
I would just like to add that if you are considering becoming a foster carer for a dog. PLEASE JOIN A RESCUE GROUP NOW!!!!

Quoted for emphasis. :D

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Hi there,

I just came across your post, and was very interested.

I am looking at starting a jack russell rescue group in victoria! And would love all the advise I can get.

I was wondering if you could please send me some of your book on foster caring?

That would be fantastic.

My email address is [email protected]

thanks for your help

steve

There have been some incidents recently that have really highlighted to me just how disordered and muddled rescue can be. The bombardment of appeals never lets up and keeps many rescuers in a constant state of emergency, rushing to retrieve dogs and rushing to place them, in a frantic effort to keep pace.

Here a some important points to remember:

1. DOL rescue is not the be all and end all of rescue. A hell of alot goes on behind the scenes and not every pound is listed on DOL. There are many other dogs on death row in other shelters that need just as much help. There are also MANY rescuers who are not on DOL, and have not even heard of DOL.

2. Not everybody on DOL rescue is an educated, experienced rescuer or foster carer. If ANY group wishes to pursue a member on the forum offering foster care for a dog it is the RESCUE GROUPS responsibility to check out the foster carer, regardless of how well they paint themselves. This includes a house and yard check, background check with other groups (if possible) and for a member of the group, preferably from the committee, to meet the potential foster carer and mark them as sound to foster.

3. If you see a dog on DOL rescue and want to help, do the right thing. Research which group you want to join with, take the necessary steps to becoming a fully fledged carer. Being a foster care provider takes time, dedication, and genuine caring. Fostering a shelter pet is a full time job. Temperament assessments are always advised before taking on a rescue dog and it is strongly advised you do this YOURSELF to make sure YOU are satisfied with the dog and are 100% positive you can provide care for the term of fostering.

4. If you are unsure on the status on a dog you have seen on DOL. Call the pound directly. www.operationtoby.com is a good place to start looking if you need to view a pound webpage for details. Be patient, be courteous, be clear and be specific. The pound staff do not enjoy the worst part of their job and it is not their fault that not every animal can be saved. If you wish to comment on the procedures of a pound, its conditions or operations, take the appropriate action ie: contact the supervisior, manager or council via email, mail or phone. Unless you are speaking on behalf of a rescue group, do not say you are.

5. When offering or asking for transport, be clear about what is needed. Give as much information as possible. Dates, times, locations, phone numbers.... Everything that might be needed, just might be needed. For rescuers asking others on DOL to pick up and drop off, make sure that all paperwork is completed at each end to save time, confusion and dogs being incorrectly chipped.

6. If you are going to say yes you can take a dog, be sure that all communication between you, the rescue group and the pound is clear. If you are unsure of anything, do not hesitate to ask. This may end in the dog being PTS even if it had a place to go, simply because communication was puzzled.

7. Try to avoid asking others to post on your behalf. This only leads to confusion and inevitably dogs may suffer. While many of us know each other in real life, many don't. One person may not realise which people belong to same groups, or how close rescuers may live to each other etc.

Key points for preventing burn out.

- Recognise and accept that you cannot save every animal.

- Use common sense.

- Learn to say no.

- Ask for help.

- Be patient.

- Know your limits.

- Know when to quit.

For anybody interested in becoming a foster carer, please PM me and I will forward you the first part of my book - A Guide To Foster Caring.

Emotion plays a large part in rescue, but emotion as the driving force can have significant drawbacks. We all have to respect our own and each others abilities and limitations.

And remember: if you have no room for just one more dog, don’t take just one more dog.

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i totally agree with this post,ive not been fostering for very long at all,since friends of mine have asked to do the same because they like my foster pups but they dont have the room time or money for them,but want to do it for the reason that pups are cute.that said pups may be cute,but there is more to fostering then the cuteness of the pups/dogs including the impact it has on your existing animals family life not to mention money.i would do anything for a dog in need but there is only so much you can do,if you run yourself into the ground with more then you can handle then how are you to help these poor dogs,and remember that just cos they seem sweet and cute does not mean that they a perfect dog some will need special attention for what ever reason they dont all come to be at the pounds thru the best circumstances and it may take a while to get them rready for re-homing.

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shmoo   

I can't believe it was almost 2 years ago that I started this thread :(

I have had many inquires for the drafts of the book, and a few pages have been released. Please be aware and respect that these are only a draft and are not to be published.

Not a day goes by that I don't think about the foster carer book, and I have been working on it in small pieces, but I have had such a crazy past 1.5 years with Cordy's Rescue closing, my health taking a major dive and now my relationship is on the rocks.

I do have every intention of completing the book and when it is finished and ready for publication rest assured DOL will be the first place to hear about it!!

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~Anne~   

Way to go Shmoo!!!

To those who may not have purchased their copy of the book, I can only say - do it now!

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simone07   

great post! In regards to some rescues/people, they have too much emotion and it destroys their judgement and ultimately leads to them burning out. The key to longevity is to pace yourself and don't take on too much - we would all love to take home the 10 dogs due to be pts at the pound, but we need to stay practical and professional if we are going to help any animals. Emotions don't help animals.

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Napoleon   

Hi this is my first time posting here so not sure if this is the right place however i do have a qst regarding the logan pound near brisbane, qld. Is there anybody who saves these dogs there or most of them? How can i find that out? I have been following dogs on their website since recently and once they were gone from the website i would check rescuepets website to find them in hope a rescue group would advertise them there but i never could.. Does that mean all those dogs have been killed? Because in the sale program thers hardly ever any dogs safe compared to the numbers that come in. I honestly feel people are not educated enough about the existence of the animal pound!!! The media should talk about it more because most people i know are not even aware of animal pounds with a kill policy existing in their neighbourhood. I am unable to foster care at the moment but how else could i possibly help the logan pound??

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shmoo   

Napoleon, I would post your question as a new topic in the rescue section. :)

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