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Labrador Retriever

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Garloch   
Hi all,

The normal thing - ask a breeder a question about a different breed! One of the young girls here at work bought a cross from a petshop (yes I know, I'm SO right there with you!) and has asked me for some help as her little girls is small, runt of the litter. I breed small terriers so have no idea how much a black lab retriever is supposed to weigh at 10 weeks. Can anyone enlighten me so I can possibly help this silly young girl?

Many thanks in advance, Garloch.

Firstly, it's a cross so nobody can give an estimate on what it should weight - it depends what it's crossed with. If it's crossed with a great dane then it's gonna be much bigger than if it's crossed with a JRT.

Secondly - black ones don't weigh any different to any other colour purebred lab. :confused: A lab would be about 5kg at that age but this dog needs to be assessed on the correct weight for its structure.

Hi - Sorry I could have explained that better couldn't I! Million things going on at work.

It looks for all the world just like a lab puppy. Definately not crossed with a JRT or a dane, or wolfy, or a peke. Apparently 3 pups were for sale, and this one was half the size of both her brothers. She is only 2.5kgs at 10 weeks and it has me quite worried. Apparently she is quite vigerous but tires really easily. I haven't even gone there yet about hips, elbows and eyes! Best to be getting this little girl the best nutrition possible at this stage.

Thanks for giving me the estimate of a lab - its a good starting point.

Garloch.

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blackdog   
Hi all,

The normal thing - ask a breeder a question about a different breed! One of the young girls here at work bought a cross from a petshop (yes I know, I'm SO right there with you!) and has asked me for some help as her little girls is small, runt of the litter. I breed small terriers so have no idea how much a black lab retriever is supposed to weigh at 10 weeks. Can anyone enlighten me so I can possibly help this silly young girl?

Many thanks in advance, Garloch.

Firstly, it's a cross so nobody can give an estimate on what it should weight - it depends what it's crossed with. If it's crossed with a great dane then it's gonna be much bigger than if it's crossed with a JRT.

Secondly - black ones don't weigh any different to any other colour purebred lab. :confused: A lab would be about 5kg at that age but this dog needs to be assessed on the correct weight for its structure.

Hi - Sorry I could have explained that better couldn't I! Million things going on at work.

It looks for all the world just like a lab puppy. Definately not crossed with a JRT or a dane, or wolfy, or a peke. Apparently 3 pups were for sale, and this one was half the size of both her brothers. She is only 2.5kgs at 10 weeks and it has me quite worried. Apparently she is quite vigerous but tires really easily. I haven't even gone there yet about hips, elbows and eyes! Best to be getting this little girl the best nutrition possible at this stage.

Thanks for giving me the estimate of a lab - its a good starting point.

Garloch.

Hi Garloch - I've always used 1kg per week of age as a guide.

At birth a well covered lab puppy will weigh about 500g.

At 1 week old it will weigh about 1kg at 2 weeks it will weigh about 2kgs and so on.

This rapid growth rate usually continues until about 16 weeks after which the weight gain slows gradually.

Between 16 & 20 weeks (4 - 5 months) there is steady (slower) weight gain but the puppy will go up on leg.

This will continue until about 9 months of age where a young Lab should have made size (height) and will weigh about 30kgs.

By 18 months of age most labs (if raised correctly) will have reached their usual adult weight of around 35-37 kgs.

You are quite right to be concerned about the cross-bred puppy.

Even if it isn't a pure bred lab 2.5kgs is very light on indeed.

And I'm wondering if her lack of growth and tiredness may not be an indicator of something more serious.

Heart defects can often present in the ways you describe.

Hope it works out for the puppy's sake.

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Garloch   
Hi all,

The normal thing - ask a breeder a question about a different breed! One of the young girls here at work bought a cross from a petshop (yes I know, I'm SO right there with you!) and has asked me for some help as her little girls is small, runt of the litter. I breed small terriers so have no idea how much a black lab retriever is supposed to weigh at 10 weeks. Can anyone enlighten me so I can possibly help this silly young girl?

Many thanks in advance, Garloch.

Firstly, it's a cross so nobody can give an estimate on what it should weight - it depends what it's crossed with. If it's crossed with a great dane then it's gonna be much bigger than if it's crossed with a JRT.

Secondly - black ones don't weigh any different to any other colour purebred lab. :confused: A lab would be about 5kg at that age but this dog needs to be assessed on the correct weight for its structure.

Hi - Sorry I could have explained that better couldn't I! Million things going on at work.

It looks for all the world just like a lab puppy. Definately not crossed with a JRT or a dane, or wolfy, or a peke. Apparently 3 pups were for sale, and this one was half the size of both her brothers. She is only 2.5kgs at 10 weeks and it has me quite worried. Apparently she is quite vigerous but tires really easily. I haven't even gone there yet about hips, elbows and eyes! Best to be getting this little girl the best nutrition possible at this stage.

Thanks for giving me the estimate of a lab - its a good starting point.

Garloch.

Hi Garloch - I've always used 1kg per week of age as a guide.

At birth a well covered lab puppy will weigh about 500g.

At 1 week old it will weigh about 1kg at 2 weeks it will weigh about 2kgs and so on.

This rapid growth rate usually continues until about 16 weeks after which the weight gain slows gradually.

Between 16 & 20 weeks (4 - 5 months) there is steady (slower) weight gain but the puppy will go up on leg.

This will continue until about 9 months of age where a young Lab should have made size (height) and will weigh about 30kgs.

By 18 months of age most labs (if raised correctly) will have reached their usual adult weight of around 35-37 kgs.

You are quite right to be concerned about the cross-bred puppy.

Even if it isn't a pure bred lab 2.5kgs is very light on indeed.

And I'm wondering if her lack of growth and tiredness may not be an indicator of something more serious.

Heart defects can often present in the ways you describe.

Hope it works out for the puppy's sake.

Thanks for that reply. Very helpful. Yes, I too am concerned about a heart defect. I'm actually getting my paws on her tomorrow to have a clear close look. The tiredness is a key indicator for concern for me, but she is VERY small. I hope it works out for the pup too. I have some divetelact from my last litter to give her, and will look closely at her feeding regimen and frequency. Cross fingers!

Thanks.

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Ellie1   
Hi all,

The normal thing - ask a breeder a question about a different breed! One of the young girls here at work bought a cross from a petshop (yes I know, I'm SO right there with you!) and has asked me for some help as her little girls is small, runt of the litter. I breed small terriers so have no idea how much a black lab retriever is supposed to weigh at 10 weeks. Can anyone enlighten me so I can possibly help this silly young girl?

Many thanks in advance, Garloch.

Firstly, it's a cross so nobody can give an estimate on what it should weight - it depends what it's crossed with. If it's crossed with a great dane then it's gonna be much bigger than if it's crossed with a JRT.

Secondly - black ones don't weigh any different to any other colour purebred lab. :laugh: A lab would be about 5kg at that age but this dog needs to be assessed on the correct weight for its structure.

Hi - Sorry I could have explained that better couldn't I! Million things going on at work.

It looks for all the world just like a lab puppy. Definately not crossed with a JRT or a dane, or wolfy, or a peke. Apparently 3 pups were for sale, and this one was half the size of both her brothers. She is only 2.5kgs at 10 weeks and it has me quite worried. Apparently she is quite vigerous but tires really easily. I haven't even gone there yet about hips, elbows and eyes! Best to be getting this little girl the best nutrition possible at this stage.

Thanks for giving me the estimate of a lab - its a good starting point.

Garloch.

Hi Garloch - I've always used 1kg per week of age as a guide.

At birth a well covered lab puppy will weigh about 500g.

At 1 week old it will weigh about 1kg at 2 weeks it will weigh about 2kgs and so on.

This rapid growth rate usually continues until about 16 weeks after which the weight gain slows gradually.

Between 16 & 20 weeks (4 - 5 months) there is steady (slower) weight gain but the puppy will go up on leg.

This will continue until about 9 months of age where a young Lab should have made size (height) and will weigh about 30kgs.

By 18 months of age most labs (if raised correctly) will have reached their usual adult weight of around 35-37 kgs.

You are quite right to be concerned about the cross-bred puppy.

Even if it isn't a pure bred lab 2.5kgs is very light on indeed.

And I'm wondering if her lack of growth and tiredness may not be an indicator of something more serious.

Heart defects can often present in the ways you describe.

Hope it works out for the puppy's sake.

My pup is 23 weeks, he is weighing 24Kg's and his legs seem short at the moment! Think Mason weighed around 6Kg,s when we collected him at 8 weeks so that little pup is really tiny!

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blackdog   

It's been a while since I visitted this Labrador thread.

So here's a subject to get some meaningful exchange happening.

If you were asked to nominate the three most important things confronting our breed what would they be?

Most would realise that hips, elbows and eyes are the "big three" genetic issues but what else?

I would appreciate your thoughts.

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If you were asked to nominate the three most important things confronting our breed what would they be?

Okay...not sure if this is what you mean but genetic issues aside......

1. Popularity - its good that its a popular breed, however, with this comes an over abundance of breeders. Okay, supply and demand etc....but a lot are just breeding "purebred" labradors, and IMO a lot of Labradors that are not the best quality.

For those that know me personally, know that I have an passion in the chocolate labrador, which I have had for many years.....but unfortunately again, due to popularity and "colour fads", it is disheartening to see the amount of them being produced to satisfy a fad, again.......quantity over quality.

2. Public perception of a negative kind. Having to defend the breed from those that repeatedly say "Labradors bite".....all dogs can BITE. I find the worst offenders are those concerned with BSL and with one of the worlds most popular breeds, they would do better to have us on their side, than continue to alienate us and our breed with these derogatory comments all the time.

3. Still thinking of a third thing........will ponder that some more.

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mikelli   
If you were asked to nominate the three most important things confronting our breed what would they be?

Most would realise that hips, elbows and eyes are the "big three" genetic issues but what else?

I would appreciate your thoughts.

Have been thinking on this one for a couple of days so here goes....

1. I have to agree with MM about the "Chocolate Mania" sweeping the country there are so many chocolate puppies being produced for colour and no heed being given to quality that it frightens me.....this is why chocolate labs are getting bad publicity I feel..

2. The fact that unsound dogs get hi-lighted all the time (not saying that we do not have problems which need addressing) but very little is heard about the 1000's of beautiful healthy sounds dogs that are out there everywhere.

3.Educating Puppy buyers re diet and exercise requirements of their babies - why is it that so many people choose not to follow the advice breeders give them.....

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Tapua   
It's been a while since I visitted this Labrador thread.

So here's a subject to get some meaningful exchange happening.

If you were asked to nominate the three most important things confronting our breed what would they be?

Most would realise that hips, elbows and eyes are the "big three" genetic issues but what else?

I would appreciate your thoughts.

Apart from the big three eye,hips,elbows I would say.

1 The 'aware' public ...and I use the term 'aware' loosley ... who although they seem to be asking the health questions dont understand the answers and expect perfection is achievable in type, movement, temperament,colour as well as hips/elbows/eyes. :p

2 The buyer who really really wants the pup but will not feed, socialise, excercise let alone train in the most important first 12 months. Dispite screeds of information, emails and phone calls. :(

3 Lack of mentoring for the new breeders :) - though forums like this have alot to offer new breeders. In my experience with Lab breeders I have met some incredibly open and honest breeders who are willing to offer guidance without interferance. :rofl:

I have also met ( and this pertains mostly to my previous breed of 18 years) breeders who are paranoid, controlling and have a very annoying habit of miss-informing newbies of the health and other other issues behind their line but really really quick to tell you every other kennels problems. ;)

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alanglen   

Just to jump back to the agility question....

My two girls were the only registered purebred labradors at last years National Agility Competition. The girls have been competing for 5 and 3 years and are doing well. They are unlikely to ever attain Masters but they achieve clear rounds and enjoy themselves so that's the main thing! The new baby is rising 2 and a finer build, and in combination of the lighter build and higher drive, I anticipate greater things from her.

Lab's love agility, it's just a matter of looking after joints, keeping weight down and keeping life in perspective, I adore the girls that come home with me, win, loose or draw, but we have had quite a lot of success and coming out top 20 with a clear round, in the nationals jumping round was pretty thrilling!

As for other activities, the girls are trackers and heading off to start track and search next year, they do obedience (not that well!) and endurance.

Most importnatly we love the water and can't wait for dock dogs to arrive in Victoria!

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Blackdog not sure if this is what you are after but here goes.

If we put aside the bigger issues that we are already fully aware of - eyes and hips/elbows there are few issues that should be being addressed.

1.Firstly is the negative publicity that our beautiful breed seems to attract -yes even here on DOL there is a large amount of Lab bashing that some of us find extremely offensive and have chosen not to read anymore. The publicity seems always to include the topic of 'wild child' labradors who chew everything, destroy everything and are uncontrollable.

2. Here I completely agree with MM and MIkelli, this mannia for choc babies is becoming out of control. Locally I can buy any number of unregistered, 'vet checked', choc babies - the add always says good with kids great family dog etc. When you see them walking the streets they look less like a Lab than I do.

3. As for Mikelli's 'education' comment I totally agree. We need to undertake campaigns not just for Labs but for all breeds to show the public that purebreed registered dogs are sound healthy and of great temperament. I have even heard vets recommend cross breeds because they are "healthier animals". I know someone who was told this by thier vet, followed thier advice instead of mine and ended up with a Lab X that was blind and crippled at 4.

I guess what I am saying that the three issues that face us today are definately intertwined with those of hips/elbows and eyes and it all boils down to a couple of things.

Reputable and reliable breeders who are persistent in thier efforts - yes mentoring is an issue in any breed. And education about colour, health and diet etc etc etc.

Edited by mercedes

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My perspectives on three issues confronting the labrador breed are coming from a first time dog owners point of view.

I can only think of two at the moment:

1) The popularity in x breeding the lab in order to produce a so called "Hypoallergenic dog" most of these dogs that are for sale over the Internet are placed on very alluring websites that try to persuade the public to the "so called the benefit of such dogs" I feel that unaware people looking at the labrador breed can unfortunately be swayed to purchase these x breeds instead of the real thing.

2) Is the reputation that the Labrador is an over excitable dog that does nothing more than destroy anyone and anything in it's path. It saddens me to say that I mostly hear this on DOL which is a pure breed dog site. As a first time dog owner I have had nothing but pleasure in owning a lab, my house/yard and furniture are in the same condition they were before I had a dog. I have also found training a labrador to be very rewarding and fun.

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My perspectives on three issues confronting the labrador breed are coming from a first time dog owners point of view.

I can only think of two at the moment:

1) The popularity in x breeding the lab in order to produce a so called "Hypoallergenic dog" most of these dogs that are for sale over the Internet are placed on very alluring websites that try to persuade the public to the "so called the benefit of such dogs" I feel that unaware people looking at the labrador breed can unfortunately be swayed to purchase these x breeds instead of the real thing.

2) Is the reputation that the Labrador is an over excitable dog that does nothing more than destroy anyone and anything in it's path. It saddens me to say that I mostly hear this on DOL which is a pure breed dog site. As a first time dog owner I have had nothing but pleasure in owning a lab, my house/yard and furniture are in the same condition they were before I had a dog. I have also found training a labrador to be very rewarding and fun.

:mad Nice to read someone else agrees with me that Labs are not destructive devils - mine have never destroyed anything. Its all about training and boundaries and keeping them occupied.

And yes training a lab to be well behaved and then owning a well trained Lab is a very rewarding experience

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blackdog   
Just out of interest, how common (or uncommon) is the fox red shade of the yellow Labs?

Hi Poodlefan - true fox red is a very uncommon coat colour.

There are plenty of Labs around that carry a dark yellow coat but true fox red is almost non existent.

Below is an interesting link.

http://www.littleriverlabs.com/foxred2.htm

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Mas1981   
My perspectives on three issues confronting the labrador breed are coming from a first time dog owners point of view.

I can only think of two at the moment:

1) The popularity in x breeding the lab in order to produce a so called "Hypoallergenic dog" most of these dogs that are for sale over the Internet are placed on very alluring websites that try to persuade the public to the "so called the benefit of such dogs" I feel that unaware people looking at the labrador breed can unfortunately be swayed to purchase these x breeds instead of the real thing.

2) Is the reputation that the Labrador is an over excitable dog that does nothing more than destroy anyone and anything in it's path. It saddens me to say that I mostly hear this on DOL which is a pure breed dog site. As a first time dog owner I have had nothing but pleasure in owning a lab, my house/yard and furniture are in the same condition they were before I had a dog. I have also found training a labrador to be very rewarding and fun.

I agree totally, I have found a lab wonderful to own, and I have owned 2 other breeds and I prefer the lab, he has been the easiest to train and the least stubborn, AND the most willing to please, he WANTS to do the right thing to make us happy.

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I do like the pink nails..... :laugh:

I hope they find her soon. Best of luck.

Blackdog - Now that we have given you our thoughts.....I'm sure we'd all like to hear yours on the subject.

:)

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Tapua   
Just out of interest, how common (or uncommon) is the fox red shade of the yellow Labs?

Hi Poodlefan - true fox red is a very uncommon coat colour.

There are plenty of Labs around that carry a dark yellow coat but true fox red is almost non existent.

Below is an interesting link.

http://www.littleriverlabs.com/foxred2.htm

I has met a couple of people who think their dogs are fox red but I would probably call them a rich deep yellow. The Little River dog in the USA are a unique colour. I am having trrouble uploading the pics so if you have a look at our website in the Lab Family section there are some pics of the pups from our first litter - one in particular looked potentially fox red but to look at them both now at 5 months they are just a deep rich yellow to me! Though darker than I have seen for a long time . More like the yellow labs I remember as a kid.

http//:www.tapualabs.com

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Just out of interest, how common (or uncommon) is the fox red shade of the yellow Labs?

Hi Poodlefan - true fox red is a very uncommon coat colour.

There are plenty of Labs around that carry a dark yellow coat but true fox red is almost non existent.

Below is an interesting link.

http://www.littleriverlabs.com/foxred2.htm

Thanks Blackdog :laugh:

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Given the popularity of this breed and the number of registered breeders breeding litters from untitled parents, how would breeders and fanciers recommend people go about selecting a quality, ethical, responsible breeder?

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