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Troy

Siberian Husky

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We got ours for around $100 retail.

But considering how annoying the splashing was it was well worth it.

Plus every animal we had around loved it.

12509.jpg

We have this, as the other ones we looked at all had the water pooling down the bottom.

Which would essentially make it an endless stream for splashing.

We actually put a plastic bowl over the top part of this as well as cheeky chops worked out how to splash in it

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BigDaz   

Does anyone have any contacts at http://siberianhuskyrescue.org.au/.

I managed to talk a guy at work into adopting a Husky from a rescue instead of buying a pup, I did advise him of the challenges with owning a Husky (Not that I have any experience, I deal with Staffords). He contacted this organisation on a number of occasions regarding a girl he was interested in form their web site and has not really heard much back from them in a couple of weeks.

Could this mean they have rejected him as a possible owner or are they just not good at responding to potential owners?

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I'm not sure about them someone else should pop in who does though. He could have a look at Arctic Breed Rescue they are NSW & QLD. They currently have a fair few dogs needing homes :(

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Yup would definitely recommend Arctic Breed Rescue as well, my boy is from them. I filled in an online form and was called back on the same day with a meet and greet organised for the following Saturday. I have also had excellent follow up support from them and could not be happier.

They are primarily operating in NSW and QLD but have been known to do interstate options, usually a back up plan is necessary in case it doesn't work out. Would you friend be prepared to travel to meet and greet?

I think that the Siberian Husky club of Vic also have a rescue arm, I have not had dealings with them though.

If you want to PM me about his situation I can see if there is any reason that I think he would not be suitable?

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BigDaz   

Thanks for the information, he is in Victoria so a Rescue in Victoria would be the preferred option.

I dont know a lot about his situation, I really just got involved by talking him into a Rescue instead of purchasing a pup, well, actually my first discussion was based around how much work a Husky can be.

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Also I have just remembered there is Northern Victorian Sled Dog Rescue/Rehoming.

Alaskan Malamute Rehoming Aid Aust will most likely have some Husky x Malamutes available in VIC as well if he is open to a x breed.

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Also note that sometimes these organisations list dogs that come into their care as Alaskan Huskies.

More that likely it's just a siberian crossed with something, so don't nessasarily let the 'breed' throw anyone off.

I think they're all pretty good at matching the right sibe to the right home. :)

Edited by Esky the husky

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BigDaz   

He has now given up on a Husky and is looking at other breeds, which I am quite happy about as I didnt feel he had enough knowledge of the breed to deal with them effectively.

On the downside, he has gone back to looking at puppies rather than rescue as the lack of response has put him off.

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ABR currently have 7 dogs in VIC needing new homes

Arctic Breed Rescue (ABR) does not have operations in VIC :) Only operational in QLD and NSW, although we do adopt interstate.

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Hey folks,

Interesting read, my housemate recently got a husky pup and reading through here he certainly ticks most of the husky boxes! Except he eats like a horse!

He's only a pup still, but is incredibly dominant and likes to try and prove this by biting. This obviously has to stop and we're probably looking at taking him to a behaviorlist or somebody who knows about these dogs. I'm no expert by any stretch of the imagination, I've had dogs all my life but this one has me stumped. Looking for recommendations in the Melbourne area?

Thanks

Edited by Misterskill

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Yonjuro   

Hey folks,

Interesting read, my housemate recently got a husky pup and reading through here he certainly ticks most of the husky boxes! Except he eats like a horse!

He's only a pup still, but is incredibly dominant and likes to try and prove this by biting. This obviously has to stop and we're probably looking at taking him to a behaviorlist or somebody who knows about these dogs. I'm no expert by any stretch of the imagination, I've had dogs all my life but this one has me stumped. Looking for recommendations in the Melbourne area?

Thanks

Sounds like normal mouthy husky puppy behaviour, how old is the pup?

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About 10-12 weeks now I recon, something he will potentially grow out of? I dunno, I've never delt with bitey dogs.

Update:

A lot better now. Part growing up, part not getting away with it. Still tries it on certain people, it seems half the hurdles in training a dog is keeping away other peoples influences!

Edited by Misterskill

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About 10-12 weeks now I recon, something he will potentially grow out of? I dunno, I've never delt with bitey dogs.

Update:

A lot better now. Part growing up, part not getting away with it. Still tries it on certain people, it seems half the hurdles in training a dog is keeping away other peoples influences!

It is completely normal behaviour for a young pup to mouth and bite things (including people). It isn't a sign of 'dominance' or the like - it is a puppy exploring the world. Like human babies, their way of exploring new things is to put them in their mouths! It is an important part of being a well adjusted pet to learn what is acceptable to mouth and how hard. This is how dogs learn bite inhibition.

Sounds like it is getting better - but the most common solutions are to redirect the mouthing to a toy, if it is a hard bite 'yelp' in a loudish and high pitched voice so the pup realises it was too hard or end the game immediately. It is also important with pups sometimes not to get them too excited when playing as often there is a 'threshold' where they go bananas biting things. The games should end just before that point is reached.

You are spot on about the hardest part of training :laugh: It is a constant battle to ensure other people don't set your training back by their actions. Most of the time it is simply ignorance on their part, but it is still tough to deal with!

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Things   

My pup is coming up on a year old and is still pretty mouthy, but he's never really hurt me. Apart from that though he's the best behaved pup, I'm not sure he's even a husky after reading some other peoples dealings with them :)

Edited by Things

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Does anyone here own a Siberian Husky and lives in Sydney? We are struggling to find people who will commit to regular play dates for socialization and fun with our Male 12 month old :-(

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