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Pointer

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There is a very good article on breeding solid Pointers if you go to the Solivia Pointers website.

Yeah :laugh:

Thanks that article was good, and I love solid black pointees :rofl:

I have another question, I know that dogs obviously vary within breed in terms of energy levels to some extent.

When I was having a look at a site (think it was a US or UK one) there were a few ads from people looking to rehome juvenile pointers as they said they were just so much more energetic than they imagined. One person said they did an hours biking in the morning and and hours running in the afternoon every single day and still the dog was not happy.

Is that what you would expect re: energy levels or are there some that are more hard core and some that would be happy with say an active life, by that I mean several walks a day but not nessarily high speed running at every walk, as otherwise I would think that would put them beyond the ability of your average person who works to keep them happy.

As an example my own dog has 40 mins free running in the morning, 1hr lead walk (thanks to my neighbour) in the afternoon and training or a short walkin the evening. He is what I would consider an active dog (staffy x kelpie rescue) but judging by some of the things I read that wouldn't be enough for a pointer?

I am interested in the HPR type breeds generally but just wonder if it is possible to do them justice if you live in an urban area and work full time?

Also another quick question are they prone to gastric torsion?

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Ashanali   

Energy levels are different from Pointer to Pointer.

Ronin and Sunni are happy free running in the yard for 30 minutes in the morning and an hour each night. I'm actually lucky that they are so easily settled because Ronin has arthritis in his elbow and it's recommended he doesn't have alot of exercise until he's been through some treatment and Sunni only has three toes on one foot and will go lame in the foot if she is overworked. If we walk, it's a short walk (5 - 10 minutes) at a medium pace.

Shensei (who is now with Gunoush in Sth Australia) was a different kettle of fish. She NEEDED the exercise and became demanding without it... Kayo (my solid liver) is about three steps beyond Kayo and is also destructive. I could take a photo of the damage she has done but I'm trying to ignore it for the moment. Kayo must have the exercise or she goes crazy. I only free run until they are 12 months so again, she has short walks but I make sure she has plenty of zoomy time within the yard.

Now for the comparison - Sunni, as a younger dog, was about as intense as Shensei was. She was an escape artist and was hit by a car just after her first birthday when she went on one of her 'get out at all costs' missions. However she is now one of the most calm, placid and easy going Pointers that I have owned. She isn't demanding, she isn't destructive - she is perfect.

As an example my own dog has 40 mins free running in the morning, 1hr lead walk (thanks to my neighbour) in the afternoon and training or a short walkin the evening. He is what I would consider an active dog (staffy x kelpie rescue) but judging by some of the things I read that wouldn't be enough for a pointer?

I would say that this is about right for an average pointer. Some will need more, some will need less.

I live in the suburbs and have been in a range of houses from 400sqm to 1/4 acre. All dogs are different and have varying energy levels. Overall, you would expect a pointer to have a high activity level and should be prepared for such. There will always be those that are over the top or who are more laidback. As long as the dog has it's individual needs met, it will be happy.

Also another quick question are they prone to gastric torsion?

Pointers are a deep chested breed so it's always possible although very rare. A pointer that I bred died about 18 months ago from gastric torsion. Her owners were devastated but after talking to their vet, they were satisfied that it wasn't a common occurence and they ended up with another Pointer from me. She is the only Pointer I know of personally that has died from torsion and bloat.

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Melbomb   
As an example my own dog has 40 mins free running in the morning, 1hr lead walk (thanks to my neighbour) in the afternoon and training or a short walkin the evening. He is what I would consider an active dog (staffy x kelpie rescue) but judging by some of the things I read that wouldn't be enough for a pointer?

I would say that this is about right for an average pointer. Some will need more, some will need less.

If you were to offer some mental stimulation of some sort (i'm thinking a few blocks of training, kongs, or treat balls, fetch, games, etc) would that lessen the amount of walks or runs that your pointer would require? Or should they be in conjunction with each other? :laugh:

Edited by Melbomb

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Ashanali   

Mental stimulation would lessen the amount of time. There are plenty of people in soggy wet countries that talk about games they play with their dogs when they can't get out to give them a walk.

Lots of discussion about it here: http://www.ledgands.co.uk/discuss/

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Pointees   

Hi guys!

Just adding onto the energy needs of a Pointer!

My pointer bitch is the same. I live on 1/4 acre and she is fine.

Good hour free run in the back yard, and an hour and a half in the afternoon, and 30 minutes before I go to bed to avoid an messes in myj house. And she is great! Good walk morning, afternoon or evening. I like to mix it around for her so she doesn't get dependent on the one time. 30 or so minutes of training and she is great!

Sometimes she also gets a BC or Lab to run with and she is fine. :thumbsup: She sometimes goes on trail rides with me. She's great and follows the horse everywhere! Couldn't have asked for a better dog. Sleeps all night also! Doesn't make a noise! :)

Heres a photo of her and her BC friend!

post-28840-1246961703_thumb.jpg

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Ashanali   

They only seem to drool when excited.

I have had one of my breeding trained as an assistance dog. He went well but the home he was trained for fell through. Unfortunately his training was specific to one person's needs so he was pet homed.

The right Pointer would make a great therapy dog. I know Ronin would be ideal... he had x-rays a few weeks ago and they were able to get five perfect shots without any sedation as he is calm and allows people to move him around however they want to. I wasn't even in the room so this was with complete strangers doing all they had to do.

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Our boy Hiro would make a awesome Therapy Dog, even from a pup he has had the most gentle nature, My wife who works in a Aged Care Facility, regularly takes Hiro into work to visit the Residents, they love him and always look forward to his next visit, and our Vet would like to have him accredited to do hospital visits.

Hiro's Litter sister Priah is staying with us for a while, and she too would be a great Therapy Dog, her Nature is lovely and is the most affectionate Pointer that I have Know,

But not all of Pointers would be suitable for this, as some are not as laided back,

Energy Needs, ours have free roam of the yard during the day and the lounge at night, we free run them 3 or 4 times a week in a very large fully enclosed area and they are lead walked as often as possible, this seems to be the ideal for our Babes,

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Pointees   

April is the same.

I was taking her on the train about a month ago, and a little girl (she was about 5) ran up and hugged April.

It was great. April didn't get excited and jump around. Instead she waged her tail and licked the poor girl. :rolleyes:

They are very sweet dogs.

I'm sure any owner/breeder would agree!

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poocow   

Are pointees prone to being escape artists? I just worry if I do eventually get one that I will have to make my fences (6 ft) like fort knox to stop them getting out.

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Ashanali   

Some are, some aren't.

Ronin can lift himself to the top of the 6ft fence but if he managed to get himself over he'd just sit at the gate and wait to get back in (unless following another dog).

Sunni was a shocker as a pup but as an adult she has no desire to go anywhere.

Kayo can get over 4ft fences but not 5ft fences. She also slips through the tiniest gaps. I think she's made of rubber. ALTHOUGH none of them has attempted to go under the fence *knock on wood*.

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poocow   

Thanks for that - Darcy is the same as Ronin - if he escaped he would just sit on the front door step and wait for someone to get home and let him inside so he could get on his lounge :eek: He is made of rubber too - can fit through pool fence bars.

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Pointees   

April does the same. Today, she jumped out the back of a horse float (long story short, I was trying to protect her while I caught a run away foal), well, she decided she had to jump out the back (while the tail gate was up and locked) and she had to help her mum round up this foal... Too bad she didn't realsed that she was not helping at all. :happydance2:

She was also great today when we went on a trail ride. Followed the horses, stayed away from the roads, POINTED at everything that moved, tried to climb a tree, and of course, came back when called. She seem to enjoy the mud to roll in, and the time she spend rounding up the horses. :cheer:

She still amazes me. :hug:

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Pointees   

Adding to the Pointer thread here.

Aril is great with any type of person!

She has had a little children (about 5 years old) walk up to her and hug her neck on a train.

She just stood there wagging her tail. :vomit:

She did well, considering how nervous she is on a train.. She hides under the seats. :)

My pa has advanced parkinsons, and she will walk up to him, sit down and get all the pats she wants. She will sit and drop when he tells her, and she shakes hands with him. She is wonderful and gentle with him, then she gets into the their paddock yard and runs around like an idiot. :laugh:

Sweet yeah?

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Snowysal   

Our 3 GSP girls are great with everyone from new babies to older folk but do expect at least recognition on meeting or they get a bit put out and sulk. Diva's all of them.As for escaping - Alcatraz here keeps them in check- just but if one small checkpoint is left unguarded or unpatrolled or (heaven forbid)open - theyre out, not so much to run away as to play in the paddocks, hunt birds on the dam or (very bad) chase rabbits, roos or birds till they are exhausted or hungry when they come home. They dont chase stock (have no interest) and very very rarely leave the property if ever. Girls just wanna have fun, most often (all except Lunar) will come when called back anyway.

Theyve all been round the horses all along so dont take much notice of them and know to stay out of theyre way.

Edited by Snowysal

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O.k, I'm planning on getting a GSP July-Sept next year (Depending when the bitch goes into season, but thats the breeds prediction)

When you say '30 min free run' is that just letting the dog run around outside, or is that thhrowing a ball to get them running or something?

One of the breeders I spoke to suggested an electric fence if the pup grows into an escape artist. Is that too harsh? Would it work? Escaping is the only behaviour problem that would be a huge issue for me. Craters in the yard and wrecked shoes I can deal with. Irate neighbours with dead chooks threatening to kill my dog I can't deal with.

Also, how do you explain the colour variations? Some livers look dull brown, while others are a gorgeous dark coppery brown, and the white merled areas - some have a lot of white with small solid brown flecks, some are more evenly merled like a cattle dog iykwim?

I suppose it's not that important, but I prefer the coppery ones with more white in the merled area's and patches of solid colour. Does that description have a name?

Do all GSp 'talk'? I love the talking!

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Ashanali   
O.k, I'm planning on getting a GSP July-Sept next year (Depending when the bitch goes into season, but thats the breeds prediction)

When you say '30 min free run' is that just letting the dog run around outside, or is that thhrowing a ball to get them running or something?

One of the breeders I spoke to suggested an electric fence if the pup grows into an escape artist. Is that too harsh? Would it work? Escaping is the only behaviour problem that would be a huge issue for me. Craters in the yard and wrecked shoes I can deal with. Irate neighbours with dead chooks threatening to kill my dog I can't deal with.

Also, how do you explain the colour variations? Some livers look dull brown, while others are a gorgeous dark coppery brown, and the white merled areas - some have a lot of white with small solid brown flecks, some are more evenly merled like a cattle dog iykwim?

I suppose it's not that important, but I prefer the coppery ones with more white in the merled area's and patches of solid colour. Does that description have a name?

Do all GSp 'talk'? I love the talking!

This is a thread about English Pointers. Not GSP's. :)

GSP's don't have a thread in this area yet BUT you can chat to the GSP people here if you like http://www.dolforums.com.au/index.php?showtopic=106681

alternatively, choose an English Pointer instead. :)

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benny123   

I have a very serious question for Pointee breeder/owners....

....can we have more pics please? :laugh:

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