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Australian Cattle Dog

115 posts in this topic

Riddick   

It wqas really good reading quite a lot of the posts here.

I have owned a male and a female and a red and blue Heeler now.

And what has been said in all these posts is all correct.

Our lady was your typical I will sit back and watch what is going on.

Hated other dogs in her face at Obedience training.

But learnt so quickly, she was the athletic type as I call them.

But she is gone now and this brings me to the next one.

Our new boy is a Blue boy and is now a year old.

He is a little slower to learn but still picks up things all but a little slower.

He is a more in your face dog who will play with any dog that can keep up.

As I have had to place him on the lead due to his stamina.

His build is much more solid than our red girl.

The biggest difference I have noticed is that he is I will go where no one else will go.

In the 1st week we had him home he showed me something I have never seen a pup do.

Fast asleep the door rattled and he woke up barking and made a bee line to where the noice was coming from.

Most pups whould bark but it would be doing backwards steps.

Not him he just went for the noise and not even bothering about his own safety.

As I have said he is a little slower to pick up things.

But i will tell you I love this boy as he has got heaps of character.

I also forgot to say that Heelers are as far as I know the most destructive pups out.

We have had other pups and they don't hold a candle to what a Heeler can get to.

So get past this point and you will find that your judgment in picking this breed as your dog was oh so right.

Their aim is to please you and to protect you no matter what.

Edited by Riddick

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Riddick   

1. What is my relationship with the breed?

This ins't my 1st Heeler, we have had them before and this is why we have decided to go to what we know.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

This is not a true answer but as far as I know they were developed in N.S.W. as well as Queensland.

And by a couple of different people who were after the same thing.

They have a few breeds in them to get them to what they are today. Bred to heard cattle, hence the name.

The White mark on their head is call the Bentley mark after one of the breeders.

3. How common is it in Australia?

You can see these in all area's of the country. This is city as well. They are becoming a popular dog now.

4. What is the average lifespan?

Our last Heeler was with us for 1 month short of 14 years and this is the typical answer. Though 1 has lived for 29 years.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

A Heeler can be a shy and watchful and its own sibling can also be very up front. A lot depends on the actual dog.

They can be clowns while also being reserved. They tend to pick a member in your family who they make a strong bond with

over and above everyone else, while still listening to the others, they will take more commands for that one person easier first.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

A daily walk is needed and if you can get to a park where it can run then this would be really good.

Walks should be for at least a half an hour.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I don't think this is the idea dog as your 1st dog.

Not to say they are hard but you have to know a little about dogs in general.

They are no fools and if you are a weak leader they will run all over you.

They need training and they need a firm but fair leader.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

I have found that as pups this is a definite NO.

As Adults it is yes.

9. How much grooming is required?

This is minimal like once a week or so but during the shredding period it isn't a bad idea to do it daily.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Don't kid yourself about them be boisterous as it is so true. Little kids should not be left with them.

They are a powerful dog and a kid in the way will just be ran right through. The same applies for older people.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

As far as I know there are none, though I do think that later they can go deaf and blind.

Though I have been lucky as none of these has happened to me.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result

To those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Being Heeler I think the main question I would asked is about its injections and worming.

Apart from that maybe what has its diet been so you can keep it like that and slowly bring in what you want to feed it.

Edited by Riddick

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gillybob   

My first working dog was a ACD called Ringer.

She worked with me and a GSD on a dairy farm.She came from a cage outside a pet shop in Gympie.Good at cattle and the best mate I ever had.She worked with me for a few years, then we moved and she stopped working. Thats when she got toey, because she had nothing to do. I walked her a few hours everyday and I knew my home was safe from burglers and I was safe when she was there. A few times she stood between me and a threat.

Ringer was ok when my lab Judda came, they became firm friends, but she hated my neighbours ACD. To the point if I didnt tie her up when he was due home, she would race after the ute and jump into it when it was still moveing.It was interesting that when the Lab picked up ticks Ringer didnt, they went everywhere together, but she never got a tick, although Judda had heaps.

But she was made for work and loved to work, when she stopped she got sick and I lost her to cancer.But I did have 8 years with her. She was my best dog.

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RossP   

Hi All.

I am it a bit of distress over my 9 week old pup.

I have had her 1 week now and she is great.

Already house trained, has the "Sit" command nailed & leads okay for her age.

Runs a lot and plays with our other dog all the time.

I am concerned about her heart rate.

This is the first pup I have ever had that the heartbeat is so hard and fast to feel when carried.

It seems to race, even sleeping her heartbeat is around 160 BPM.

Took her to a Vet but she wasn't very help full.

She said it may or may not be an issue.

All 4 chambers in the heart are strong.

I have searched for any info about heart rates in pups, but all I can find is that pups have a fast heartbeat that slows as they get older.

I can't find exactly what is a normal heartbeat speed.

Even the Vet didn't give me a figure.

If anyone can give me a figure for BPM that would be great.

After a little running her BPM can be 220BPM or higher.

I am very distressed over this.

Thanks for reading

sasha2.jpg

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Hi Ross why dont you ask this question in the health section. You might get more people reading and increase the chances of hopefully some enlightened info.

I never measured my ACD's heart rates but they do tend to be all go go go then crash for a sleep. If you are really concerned can you book her into the specialists, money well spent if it puts your mind at ease.

Is this your first ACD? They are just the most intuitive, cognitive dogs you will find anywhere. I love mine to bits :laugh:

Edited by Inevitablue

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RossP   

Hi Inevitablue

Thanks for your reply and I have done as you suggested.

And yes, I have owned several ACD's in the past, I was a farmer.

Great companions no matter what you do, a thoroughly enjoyable breed.

Edited by RossP

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RossP   

I have had her checked out by 3 vets now, none of then have come up with a heart rate, very frustrating.

They don't know what it should be, just listen to hear if it is fast or slow.

She appears to be doing well, already house trained, sits & speaks on command.

Leads very well and barks at the back door to either come in or go out.

Has no interest in chooks either.

11.jpg

Phone camera appears to make her head out of proportion to her body, but it's not.

22.jpg

My Wife has a Papillon which weighs about 3.5 kg, but they play well together

Edited by RossP

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Wow, glitch int he matrix...didn't mean to post over here. nice dogs though

Edited by mixeduppup

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RossP if nothing really obvious has stood out to 3 vets, if was me, I would just check her resting heart rate when she is 6 months and 12 months old and not worry too much about it now.

Great to hear she is picking things up so quickly. I have been looking at the American Working Breed Standard for ACD's Working Standard and it's even listed that the breed should be able to perform tasks after only one or two exposures. I think it is a well written standard, I just wish people wouldnt interpret 'suspicious' as apprehensive. Too many dogs are 'suspicious - scared' not 'suspicious - 'what are you up to?'

It will be interesting to see if she develops her instinct for working the chooks! She has stunning dark eyes :)

My guys have been little superstars at herding (which I'm not too surprised, I deliberately bought these dogs as they come from a line which focused more on farm ability than show ring ability)

Tess, at 18 months old had her first competition in with the big boys, Herding Started A Course on sheep. Apart from stuffing up the cast at the very beginning she finished on 91.5/100. She normally does that length of cast ok, so I'm really excited for the next trial in 4 weeks time as she didn't loose a single point through the obstacles. I'm trying to organise a trip to Victoria to compete in some cattle trials. I suspect she is already the highest titled ACD in herding in Australia (if she isn't she will be in 5 weeks time :laugh:)

My boy has suffered a little, as during his younger months when he should have been learning his craft there was no training due to summer. However he has made up lost time and last weekend got his Herding Test title. He is a handful as he is sooooo keen, while waiting around he will stand up on the fence to just look at the sheep. I cant wait to get him on cattle.

I just love this photo(taken by DOLer poocow)

HerdingZacG.jpg

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RossP   

That is a great photo, a working dog doing what they do best.

When I was farming I had one Heeler that would round up the following.

Geese, Horses, Cattle, Sheep, Goats & Chickens.

She would cast close to 1klm in thick fog, find the flock of sheep in the scrub and bring them to me.

She would never give up at what ever she did.

The only animals that tried her patience were ducks, just couldn't get the hang of them.

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That is a great photo, a working dog doing what they do best.

When I was farming I had one Heeler that would round up the following.

Geese, Horses, Cattle, Sheep, Goats & Chickens.

She would cast close to 1klm in thick fog, find the flock of sheep in the scrub and bring them to me.

She would never give up at what ever she did.

The only animals that tried her patience were ducks, just couldn't get the hang of them.

I will be very happy with a 200m cast!! :laugh: I love watching the dogs do those long, fence running casts

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Hope you don't mind me posting in here.

Just wondering what the ideal weight range is for ACD's?

I have two.. my girl looks to be purebred but I am not sure and to be honest, couldn't care less- she is just perfect the way she is anyway :D we got her at 8 weeks old from a pet shop (before I knew any better) and she is the love of my life. She will be 7 later this year. My boy is ACD x Staffy... he is a rescue and about 8 years old. I love him lots too, but my girl will always be my heart dog :)

Both need to be kept lean- my girl has pretty bad damage to her cruciate ligaments (unable to have surgery) and arthritis in her back legs :( My boy has very straight back legs and when I took him in for his vet check, the vet told me to keep him light as he will be very susceptible to the same problems as my girl.

Last time they were weighed (both about a month ago) my girl was 23kgs and boy was 27kgs. Boy was definitely a little bit overweight when he came to us from the shelter and has since been on a diet and lost a couple of kilos, he'd probably be around 25kgs now at a guess.

Just wondering if this is a good weight (keeping in mind they need to be a few kgs lighter than 'normal') for them both?

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hippo   

dogbreedinfo says:

Weight: Males 32 - 35 pounds (15 – 16 kg) Females 30 - 35 pounds (14 – 16 kg)

Although that seems very light to me! And if you don't know if your dogs are purebred, then perhaps just go by the standard of being able feel the ribs. Probably won't be able to see the last two through their dense fur.

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That does seem incredibly light :S I would think if they weighed that they would look very underweight. You can feel the ribs but not see them. I am confident they are not underweight.. just worry they might be a couple of kgs too heavy and with their leg problems a couple of kgs can be a big deal. Thanks for your reply.

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Ven   

my girl is 25kg and she is purebred (papers, ANKC registered)

according to vet she is ideal weight. Thats 10KG over that :eek:

Edited by Ven

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