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The Beagle

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=107 )

Group: Group 4 (Hounds)

General Appearance: A sturdy, compactly-built hound, conveying the impression of quality without coarseness.

Characteristics: A merry hound whose essential function is to hunt, primarily hare, by following a scent. Bold, with great activity, stamina and determination. Alert, intelligent and of even temperament.

Temperament: Amiable and alert, showing no aggression or timidity.

Head And Skull: Fair length, powerful without being coarse, finer in the bitch, free from frown and wrinkle. Skull slightly domed, moderately wide, with slight peak. Stop well defined and dividing length, between occiput and tip of nose, as equally as possible. Muzzle not snipy, lips reasonably well flewed. Nose broad, preferably black, but less pigmentation permissible in lighter coloured hounds. Nostrils wide.

Eyes: Dark brown or hazel, fairly large, not deep set or prominent, set well apart with mild appealing expression.

Ears: Long, with rounded tip, reaching nearly to end of nose when drawn out. Set on low, fine in texture and hanging gracefully close to cheeks.

Mouth: The jaws should be strong, with a perfect, regular and complete scissor bite, i.e. the upper teeth closely overlapping the lower teeth and set square to the jaws.

Neck: Sufficiently long to enable hound to come down easily to scent, slightly arched and showing little dewlap.

Forequarters: Shoulders well laid back, not loaded. Forelegs straight and upright well under the hound, good substance, and round in bone, not tapering off to feet. Pasterns short. Elbows firm, turning neither in nor out. Height to elbow about half height at withers.

Body: Topline straight and level. Chest let down to below elbow. Ribs well sprung and extending well back. Short in the couplings but well balanced. Loins powerful and supple, without excessive tuck-up.

Hindquarters: Muscular thighs. Stifles well bent. Hocks firm, well let down and parallel to each other.

Feet: Tight and firm. Well knuckled up and strongly padded. Not hare-footed. Nails short.

Tail: Sturdy, moderately long. Set on high, carried gaily but not curled over back or inclined forward from root. Well covered with hair, especially on underside.

Gait/Movement: Back level, firm with no indication of roll. Stride free, long reaching in front and straight without high action; hind legs showing drive. Should not move close behind nor paddle nor plait in front.

Coat: Short, dense and weatherproof.

Colour: Any recognised hound colour other than liver. Tip of stern white.

Sizes: Desirable minimum height at withers: 33 cm (13 ins).

Desirable maximum height at withers: 40 cm (16 ins).

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

First time owner, my beagle is 2 1/2 years old.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Beagle type dogs can be traced back as early as 400BC in Greece and 200AD in Britain. The Romans are thought to have transported them to England as small rabbit hunting hounds and bred them with local hounds. Talbot Hounds were brought to England from France in 1066 and are considered to be the ancestors to the Southern Hound, the Beagle and the Foxhound.

Beagles became popular with the British monarchy in the 1300 and 1400s. Both Edward II and Henry VII kept packs of Glove Beagles. By the 1400s Beagles existed in Britain, Italy, Greece and France. The word "beagle" has two possible origins. It either originated from the word 'beag' which means small or from the French word 'begle' meaning 'useless or of little value' (;) LOL).

By the 1700s two types of hounds existed for hunting rabbits; the Southern hound and the much quicker North Country Beagle. Since fox hunting was becoming increasingly popular, Beagles were being kept less and less in favour of Foxhounds. Fortunately for the Beagle, farmers in England, Ireland and Wales continued to keep packs to hunt with.

Traditionally it is said that the rich man kept a pack of foxhounds and hunted on horseback where the horses could keep up with Foxhounds in pursuit. The poorer man kept packs of Beagles, because they had fewer horses and pursued the packs of Beagles on foot. In the mid 1800s Reverend Phillip Honeywood established his pack of Beagles in Essex, England, which is thought to be the progenitor of the modern Beagle. He bred them specifically for hunting skills and a fellow Englishman, Thomas Johnson, was responsible for breeding lines of Beagles that could both hunt and looked more refined and attractive.

By 1887 the threat of extinction was on the wane: there were only 18 Beagle packs in England. The Beagle Club was formed in 1890 and the first standard drawn up at the same time. The following year the Association of Masters of Harriers and Beagles was formed. Both organisations aimed to further the best interests of the breed, and both were keen to produce a standard type of Beagle. By 1902 the number of packs had risen to 44. The Beagle Club in the UK held its first show in 1896.

3. How common is it in Australia?

The breed is relatively common. Beagles have always been a fairly popular family pet.

4. What is the average lifespan?

Easily 12-15 years, although I've heard of Beagles who've lived up to the age of 21!

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

The breed standard describes the Beagle as a "merry hound". That really encapsulates Beagles for me, they are happy, sociable little dogs that enjoy both the company of humans and other animals. They should have an even temper and an outgoing, friendly nature. Beagles can make great family dogs for the right family, as Caffiend42 says, they are the 'goldilocks' dog - not too big, not too small, just right :rofl: They are a great size and temperament for kids. Whilst intelligent dogs who are generally quick to learn with the right motivation, they are, however, renowned for their stubborn streak. They can also be VERY strong willed and unbelievably persistent when they want something. This combined with their intelligence can give both inexperienced and experienced handler a bit of a challenge!

They can also be very food driven which can be both useful and frustrating! Daisy will go to any lengths to get food. She will gorge herself and is always hungry :) She checks every day to make sure I closed the lid on the cat food container properly, the one day it wasn't closed on all four corners of the container she opened it and ate more than a kilo of cat food in minutes - and only stopped because I caught her! However, this food drive makes training easier if you use it to your benefit.

They can be a vocal hound and the 'Beagle bay' is infamous. Obviously being a scent hound, for most beagles there is nothing better than putting their nose to the ground and following a scent. It's an incredibly strong, ingrained instinct. This means that letting them off leash in uncontained areas can be dangerous as when a beagle goes into full scent drive their hearing is all but turned off and they won't hear you calling them - all they can focus on is the scent. I've heard many a incident where a beagle has followed their nose across the road without even realising there are cars coming. This can also make training interesting - despite Daisy being incredibly food driven, I could shove food under her nose when she's on a scent and she won't even notice it. If considering adding a beagle to your home you have to be prepared for their urge and instinct to put their nose to the ground and scent.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

For a smaller dog, beagles are quite active. They need to have both physical and mental stimulation or they will become bored and destructive - beagles prefer company. I aim to give Daisy at least half an hour of walking a day, however, as she's matured I've found she doesn't require quite as much exercise and has calmed down considerably.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Possibly, but Beagles can be a challenge and there are plenty in pounds and rescues across the country to reinforce the fact they are not for everyone. You need to be prepared to meet their all their physical and mental needs, a Beagle needs strict boundaries or they will take advantage. They need regular exercise and LOTS of training. Often, they are the kind of dog that will wake up every morning and ask if the rules are still the same as they were yesterday. Do not underestimate the amount of work owning a beagle can often entail. They have loving beautiful natures but are also an active, drivey hound.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Generally no. Beagles are a breed that need company, otherwise they can get bored and destructive. That's not to say they can't be kept occupied and happy on their own, but generally Beagles do better in multi dog families.

9. How much grooming is required?

Not much at all, they are short coated and don't require much brushing or bathing. They do however shed more than you will expect for a dog with such a short coat!!

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Younger beagles can get excited around other people, however Daisy has always been great around kids and infirm people. They would require basic training to ensure they don't jump up on people but then again so do many dogs!

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Whilst they are generally a healthy breed, Beagles can be prone to cherry eye. They can also be prone to ear infections as their long floppy ears mean they don't get much air flow and most beagles will need their ears cleaned fairly regularly to prevent infection. Due to their high food drive they can also be prone to obesity.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

To the best of my knowledge there aren't many health tests that beagle breeders perform. However, you should always make sure that if you aren't going through a rescue that you buy your beagle from a reputable, ethical registered breeder and that you are supplied with pedigree papers. Whilst beagles can be a healthy breed a poorly bred beagle can be prone to a variety of health problems.

Edited by huski
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Hi there, Have just picked up our gorgeous 8 week old beagle today :) and am really looking forward to having him in our lives. I am trying to learn as much as I can about this beautiful breed. This forum seems to be great!!! Top three beagle tips???

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Hi there, Have just picked up our gorgeous 8 week old beagle today :) and am really looking forward to having him in our lives. I am trying to learn as much as I can about this beautiful breed. This forum seems to be great!!! Top three beagle tips???

Congratulations on getting a beagle! :eek: And welcome to DOL - you should post some puppy pics in the photo forum ;)

My tips would be:

1) Start as you mean to go on and give him clear rules and boundaries from day one

2) Feed him a good diet!

3) Training training training - Beagles need training, both so they can grow up to have good doggy manners but also to keep them mentally stimulated. They can be very naughty pups. Pulling on the leash and lack of focus (because they always want to have their nose on the ground!) are two common problems I hear from beagle owners. I would be enrolling a good puppy school and ensuring you socialise him as much as possible with a variety of new, positive experiences between now and the next four weeks (most pups go into their first fear period around 12 weeks of age) - and remember that training continues for the life of the dog not just after puppy school has finished :)

Edited by huski
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[Thankyou so much for your advice. I will take it on board...Hopefully our first night is not too difficult. Will post some pictures as soon as I get a chance. He is far too cute!

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[Thankyou so much for your advice. I will take it on board...Hopefully our first night is not too difficult. Will post some pictures as soon as I get a chance. He is far too cute!

You're welcome. Keep us updated :laugh:

Edited by huski
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love this info

we have a female beagle, now 5 months

she seems to get frequent upset tummy - is this common for beagles

she is so loveable, and affectionate though, i cant imagine my house without her now

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love this info

we have a female beagle, now 5 months

she seems to get frequent upset tummy - is this common for beagles

No definitely not in my experience - what are you feeding her? What happens when she gets an upset tummy? How often does it happen?

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Re upset tummy - the majority of ours will eat anything and everything (Literally) and it doesn't really affect them, however I have one boy who I cannot change his food. As long as he has the same food each day and about the same amount he is fine but if he gets an 'extra' big biscuit he gets very runny poos! I have no idea why!

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Not just a pretty face!

I was looking to see what other Beagle owners had to say about this merry little hound. Only to find there wasn't much said at all...how said.

Well I challenge other Beagle owners to get active and promote the breed...get out there and do stuff.

What a Beagle is Capable of...

When we first got Bailey (Kislev Fancy Boots), born 9 March 2001, we really had no idea what we were getting into. Mostly he was a quiet, gentle soul without too much to say but when he was nearing the teenage years it was time to get serious about obedience training. When he truned two he had settled down and was really keen to learn.

As my husband and I both work, despite the walks and the amount of time we tried to spend with Bailey we realized he needed company during the day. In 2002, we introduced Potter (Kislev Heavenly Star), born 25 July 2002, a boisterous, vocal little hound. Potter sparked Bailey’s interest and they were the best of mates with Bailey becoming such a “mother” as I referred to him. Bailey was actually Potter’s uncle.

In 2002, we introduced Bailey to the fun of Agility. Until August 2003, Potter only watched from the sidelines. It wasn’t until Potter was into Obedience Level 3 and my husband took over Potter’s training that both of our dogs participated in Agility.

We have also been members of the Queensland Lure Coursing Association Inc (QLCA) and the Warwick Lure Coursing Club Inc (WLCC). When I say I am taking my dogs Lure Coursing only two people to date have known what it is all about.

At the end of 2004 Bailey (Kislev Fancy Boots FCH) and Potter (Kislev Heavenly Star FCH) were be presented with the Field Champion Certificates. Also taking first and second in the beagle group for total scores for 2004.

For my husband, our two beagles and I it’s a nice Sunday out together but we haven't been so regular lately like we have in the past.

When Bailey and Potter would come off the course they most certainly are panting like crazy but predominantly I discovered they could smile. So while I train my dogs in obedience for my benefit and the benefit of the members of society who will come into contact with them; lure coursing is purely for there enjoyment plus it benefits us all. A happy dog is a dog ready and willing to learn.

Great reasons to take up Lure Coursing; improve your dog’s physical condition and stamina or just for the sheer enjoyment of watching a dog have fun. Lure coursing is "funnnnn" for the dogs...they do it because they want to run fast and chase an artificial lure...they cannot be forced to chase a lure. However I should add here not all dogs realize what they are there to do but most will get it after a couple of events.

Each dog is scored on enthusiasm, follow, agility, speedy and endurance and each dog runs twice - once in the morning and again after a lunch break in the afternoon. Each breed on the day is awarded 1st, 2nd and 3rd and the overall winner of the day is awarded the Hound of the Day. And yes points earned go towards the title of Field Champion and Lure Courser of Merit. But like everything points can be taken away too…dogs running loose while not running the course are docked points so be careful out there.

But you really must experience it to fully appreciate a fine day out with your dog/s. Check out the details and pictures of the Queensland Lure Coursing Association.

Edited by BeagleBoys2
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Not just a pretty face!

I was looking to see what other Beagle owners had to say about this merry little hound. Only to find there wasn't much said at all...how said.

Well I challenge other Beagle owners to get active and promote the breed...get out there and do stuff.

What a Beagle is Capable of...

When we first got Bailey (Kislev Fancy Boots), born 9 March 2001, we really had no idea what we were getting into. Mostly he was a quiet, gentle soul without too much to say but when he was nearing the teenage years it was time to get serious about obedience training. When he truned two he had settled down and was really keen to learn.

As my husband and I both work, despite the walks and the amount of time we tried to spend with Bailey we realized he needed company during the day. In 2002, we introduced Potter (Kislev Heavenly Star), born 25 July 2002, a boisterous, vocal little hound. Potter sparked Bailey’s interest and they were the best of mates with Bailey becoming such a “mother” as I referred to him. Bailey was actually Potter’s uncle.

In 2002, we introduced Bailey to the fun of Agility. Until August 2003, Potter only watched from the sidelines. It wasn’t until Potter was into Obedience Level 3 and my husband took over Potter’s training that both of our dogs participated in Agility.

We have also been members of the Queensland Lure Coursing Association Inc (QLCA) and the Warwick Lure Coursing Club Inc (WLCC). When I say I am taking my dogs Lure Coursing only two people to date have known what it is all about.

At the end of 2004 Bailey (Kislev Fancy Boots FCH) and Potter (Kislev Heavenly Star FCH) were be presented with the Field Champion Certificates. Also taking first and second in the beagle group for total scores for 2004.

For my husband, our two beagles and I it’s a nice Sunday out together but we haven't been so regular lately like we have in the past.

When Bailey and Potter would come off the course they most certainly are panting like crazy but predominantly I discovered they could smile. So while I train my dogs in obedience for my benefit and the benefit of the members of society who will come into contact with them; lure coursing is purely for there enjoyment plus it benefits us all. A happy dog is a dog ready and willing to learn.

Great reasons to take up Lure Coursing; improve your dog’s physical condition and stamina or just for the sheer enjoyment of watching a dog have fun. Lure coursing is "funnnnn" for the dogs...they do it because they want to run fast and chase an artificial lure...they cannot be forced to chase a lure. However I should add here not all dogs realize what they are there to do but most will get it after a couple of events.

Each dog is scored on enthusiasm, follow, agility, speedy and endurance and each dog runs twice - once in the morning and again after a lunch break in the afternoon. Each breed on the day is awarded 1st, 2nd and 3rd and the overall winner of the day is awarded the Hound of the Day. And yes points earned go towards the title of Field Champion and Lure Courser of Merit. But like everything points can be taken away too…dogs running loose while not running the course are docked points so be careful out there.

But you really must experience it to fully appreciate a fine day out with your dog/s. Check out the details and pictures of the Queensland Lure Coursing Association.

Great post. Thankyou for your experience with the lure coursing, I bet they have fun...I too have been wondering where all the beagle posts are??!! We have a new beagle pup and still have alot to learn about this lovely breed. So the more info the better. I will be sure to check out the lure coursing pics.

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  • 2 months later...
  • 4 weeks later...

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

We are first time beagle owners so I can only talk from our experiance!!

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

See Huskis' reply, its disgustingly informative :laugh:

3. How common is it in Australia?

There are only 2 other beagles down at our local dog park, but aside from that, I feel like everyone I know knows someone else with a Beagle - and why not, they are incredible!

4. What is the average lifespan?

I've been told 10 - 15 years.....

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Happy, playful, cuddly, mischeivous, stubborn when paired with being on a scent/involved with food, very sociable, great with kids, intelligent. Very very intelligent. They are pack animals. They want to be with you - as much as possible....

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Charlie wants to play...if he has a big play he doesnt need a walk. We walk at night a fair bit and he always enjoys it, but doesnt appear to go crazy without it. There is always someone to play with and things to stimulate him so maybe thats why it's not dire? Not sure - but he always get some sort of one on one interaction in a exercisy/stimulating way, every day.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

As long as you are committed. We dog sat a Boston Terrier for over a years or so for friends of ours so we are not really first time dog owners but we kinda feel we are.

We were committed to Charlie before we even got him so there was no question as to whether or not we could cope, we just would, come hell or high water!! We struggled a little with training, still do sometimes, but we have had a behaviourist out to us to assist, and we dedicate alot of time to Charlie and do everything we can to learn more techniques. I don't feel that Charlie is majorly high maitenance though, personally. We will get another Beagle in the next few years and we have no concerns about that.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Charlie is the only dog we have and he seems fine with that. He is never alone for a long period of time though, there is always people around, he has doggie mates to play with....I can see that if he was left on his own for a very long time, or he was bored, he has the capacity to be mischevious/destructive.

9. How much grooming is required?

He does shed more than I thought he would but its no problem, i brush his coat once or twice a week, a bath once a month to once a fortnight depending on what he needs....

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Charlie is so intuitive - with my elderly grandma he sits quietly with her, and she strokes him and he doesnt move.....its lovely. With babies, charlie just wants to see them once (to know whats going on) then he leaves them alone, he is just not interested.....Plays nicely with the younger ones, but we never leave them unsupervised. I dont think anything would ever happen, but I jusst wont leave them regardless.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Ear infections cos their ears are long and floppy and trap dirt and moisture. Whever you bath them ensure you wipe the ear well to dry it as best as possible.

Obesity! Charlie loves food. Alot. Left to his own devices, I dont think he would ever stop eating.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Hip Scores. Can't really remember what its meant to be but its meant to be about the parents hip scores to let the buyer know that there is a less of a chance for hip dysplacia/arthritus..... I think? Please correct me if Im wrong. But thats for all dogs, not just beagles.

Make sure you get papers.

And refer to what Huski wrote cos again, soooo much knowlege there :mad

If there is something I've written Im open to PMs or responses. As Ive said, we are new in general to dogs and the breed, so I'm keen to keep learning :laugh::laugh:

Edited by jacquilee81
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  • 2 years later...
  • 9 months later...

G'day

I am seventy five and the wife is not far behind. We both have difficulties - the wife needs knees and a hip and a triple byepass was for me but we are luckier than most.

I wanted a puppy but wisdom almost caught up with me and I bought a 9 month old Beagle from Gumtree and how difficult could a pup be.

Well let me tell you he is most difficult and pinches everything and heads for the yard via his dog door. When I arrive its almost buried.

I was warned that we should have a companion for him but I knew best and I am wrong.

Our pup is most loving and has bonded well with us but we find it very hard to mannage him . Experts have warned us that he will be worse before he is better and he may not mature until he is around four years old.

when one of us goes out he walks around crying for ages.

He sleeps on our bed and is house trained but does he cause confusion -

If we had another dog he would be fine but we can only have one . So we are having him neutered and his vaccinations updated on Friday and handing him to a rescue group.

We are very dissapointed that we cannot manage him but now we understand that the Beagle is a very special fellow.

Would value your opinion but Beagles are far to smart for an elderly couple

Edited by peterseaford
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