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Samoyed

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Troy   

The Samoyed

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=174 )

Group: Group 6 (Utility)

General Appearance: The Samoyed being essentially a working dog should be strong and active and graceful, and as his work lies in cold climates his coat should be heavy and weather-resisting. He should not be too long in back, as a weak back would make him practically useless for his legitimate work; but at the same time a cobby body, such as a Chow's would also place him at a great disadvantage as a draught dog. Breeders should aim for the happy medium, viz. a body not long, but muscular, allowing liberty, with a deep chest and well sprung ribs, strong neck proudly arched, straight front and exceptionally strong loins. Both dogs and bitches should give the appearance of being capable of great endurance but should be free from coarseness. A full grown dog should stand about 53.5 cm (21 ins.) at the shoulder. On account of the depth of chest required the legs should be moderately long, a very short-legged dog is to be deprecated. Hindquarters should be particularly well developed, stifles well angulated, and any suggestion of unsound stifles or cowhocks severely penalised.

Characteristics: The Samoyed is intelligent, alert, full of action but above all displaying affection towards all mankind.

Temperament: (See under Characteristics.)

Head And Skull: Head powerful and wedge-shaped with a broad, flat skull, muzzle of medium length, a tapering foreface not too sharply defined. Lips black. Hair short and smooth before the ears. Nose black for preference, but may be brown or flesh-coloured. Strong jaws.

Eyes: Almond shaped, medium to dark brown in colour, set well apart with alert and intelligent expression. Eyerims should be black and unbroken.

Ears: Thick, not too long and slightly rounded at the tips, set well apart and well covered inside with hair. The ears should be fully erect in the grown dog.

Mouth: Upper teeth should just overlap the underteeth in a scissor bite.

Neck: Proudly arched.

Forequarters: Legs straight and muscular with good bone.

Body: Back medium in length, broad and very muscular. Chest broad and deep ribs well sprung, giving plenty of heart and lung room.

Hindquarters: Very muscular, stifles well angulated; cow hocks or straight stifles very objectionable.

Feet: Long, flattish and slightly spread out. Soles well cushioned with hair.

Tail: Long and profuse, carried over the back when alert; sometimes dropped when at rest.

Gait/Movement: Should move freely with a strong agile drive showing power and elegance.

Coat: The body should be well covered with a thick, close, soft and short undercoat, with harsh hair growing through it, forming the outer coat, which should stand straight away from the body and be free from curl.

Colour: Pure white; white and biscuit; cream.

Sizes: Dogs 51-56 cms (20-22 ins) at the shoulder.

Bitches: 46-51 cms (18-20 ins) at the shoulder.

Weight in proportion to size.

Faults: Severe unprovoked aggressiveness.

Long foreface.

Blue or very light eyes.

Big ears with very little feathering.

Drop ears; narrow width between ears.

A bull neck. A long body.

Slack tail carriage; it should be carried well over the back, though it may drop when the dog is at rest.

Round, cat-like feet.

A soft coat; a wavy coat; absence of undercoat.

Absence of Feathering.

Black or black spots.

Any sign of unsound movement.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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Bjelkier   

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Owner, exhibitor and breeder in training

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

The breed was first developed in Sibera by the native Samoyede (Sahm - uh - yed) , a nomadic reindeer herding people.

They were known for their stunning white dogs known then as the Bjelkier (white dog that breeds white)

The Samoyed was treasured among its people, being used for many different purposes.

From clothing and food to pulling sleds and herding the reindeer. Inside the Samoyede hunt or choom the dogs where given total freedom, being trusted to babysit the tribes children and being used as heaters, sleeping in the beds of its tribe to help fend of the freezing Siberian nights.

Later they where used on many Antartic and Arctic expiditions being a well liked sledding dog for their strength and beautifull personality.

3. How common is it in Australia?

I wouldn't say overly common. I am still surprised when someone knows what they are, usually I get a white husky or simply snow dog.

4. What is the average lifespan?

About 10 to 13 years

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

They love nothing more then being with you all the time and are very fond of children. They are sweet and kind, very devoted to their families but are also brilliant with strangers and other dogs, to a Samoyed everyone is a friend.

They have also been described as eternal puppies, never losing that mischevious puppy attitude.

Although they look soft and fluffly the Samoyed is an extremely willfull dog and need a firm but kind hand from the very begining.

Training isn't as hard as many people make out, the breed is very clever but does require the trainer to be a strong and consistant leader.

Barking can be a problem with the breed, they are known for being loud. Samoyed loves the sound of its own voice and will talk to its owners in a serious of grumbles and woo's

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

I usually work on about an hour long walk coupled with a good amount of free running and play time.

They are an active working dog and do require a good amount of mental and physical stimulation

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I think it really comes down to the owner.

But in general I would be hesitant to reccomend to a first time owner. This is a breed that requires a good amount of work and might be too much of a handfull for someone who has never had a dog before.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Although I am sure some cope just fine on their own I would be hesitant to say yes.

They love being with other dogs and people, this is a very pack minded breed and are happier with constant company.

9. How much grooming is required?

A good brush with a comb and pin brush every 2 or 3 days is all they really need, offcause more when the dog does its seasonal coat drop, this is when you will remove more hair then you even thought the dog had.

Grooming will usually take anywhere from 20 minuets to an hour or more depending on the dog and condition of the coat, if the dog is dropping coat this will take much longer.

It is very important to take good care of a Samoyed coat, it will matt easily and this is very uncomfortable for the poor dog.

Bathing should happen for a pet once or so every month or two unless otherwise required.

Before bathing always brush the coat out well, if the dog does have any matts and isn't brushed out well before a bath it will only make the problem worse.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

They can be very full on and might be too much for such people.

As with any dog supervision with children at all times is required. Although never meaning to, a Samoyed is a fast and strong breed and can easily knock a child or infirmed person down while playing.

Havin said that they love all people and make excellent teddy bears

EDT, to add info and fix unholy spelling

Edited by Wolfsong

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Icemist   

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2nd generation Breeder, shower and trialer.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

The SAMOYED is one of the oldest breeds known to man being descended, without mixture, from the dog that accompanied the "Samoyede" tribesmen during their migrations in far north Europe. The Samoyed was originally used to hunt, herd reindeer, and haul sledges for the Samoyede people they served in north western Siberia. The Samoyede tribesmen were peaceful nomads, who manifested extraordinary love for their beautiful dogs, treating them as members of the family. Thus their dogs developed a love and understanding of humankind and an unfailing sense of trust and loyalty which is retained in the breed to this day. They remain the delightful playmates and faithful protectors of children.

3. How common is it in Australia?

Samoyeds are becoming more common within Australia due to their friendly nature. But they are still mistaken for Siberian Huskies.

4. What is the average lifespan?

Approx 13 years

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

They have the best possible temperament and this says it all..

"The Samoyede tribesmen were peaceful nomads, who manifested extraordinary love for their beautiful dogs, treating them as members of the family. Thus their dogs developed a love and understanding of humankind and an unfailing sense of trust and loyalty which is retained in the breed to this day. They remain the delightful playmates and faithful protectors of children."

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

They don't need excessive exercise, just regular walks and lots of play time.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I think it really comes down to the owner and their circumstances. Most new owners should be able to cope with a Samoyed. But new owners hould be screened by a breeder to see what they do know about the breed and if the potential owner has done any homework. Even then, a new owner of the breed will need to be explained about the positives and negatives of the breed, eg. shedding of the coat. This is a breed that requires a good amount of work and might be too much of a handfull for someone who has not done the right research on the breed.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Don't have a Samoyed if you just want a dog to keep in the yard and look pretty! A bored dog is a naughty dog. Barking, digging, chewing and roaming are usually symptoms of boredom.

9. How much grooming is required?

A lot of grooming is required. The Samoyed coat requires regular grooming to keep it healthy and free of matts, parasites and loose hair. The Samoyed has a major shed (blow) at least once a year where the undercoat sheds in a spectacular way and requires many hours of work combing out. This shedding lasts approximately one month, with relatively no shedding during the rest of the year. The coat should be groomed regularly, at least once a week with a good comb through and once a fortnight paying particular attention to elbows, hocks and ears to ensure that the hair does not become matted at these points.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

No, they are the perfect companion.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

In Australia, Hip Displayia is the most common hereditary problem. Sensible breeders are aware of this and take steps in reducing the problem.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder?

Depends on a Pet or Show home.

Are you a registered breeder, Vacinations, worming, micro chipped, have the parents been hip scored, can you see the pups and parents, will you give me support after I purchase the puppy. General health and well being of the puppy. If a show home, add is the puppy registered, is it show quality. These are starting pionts.

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Diva   

Every Samoyed I have met has had the sweetest nature, but I have met a few that their owners have clipped off in summer and they have looked horrible. How do they cope with heat, do they need clipping or is that misguided?

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Bjelkier   
Every Samoyed I have met has had the sweetest nature, but I have met a few that their owners have clipped off in summer and they have looked horrible. How do they cope with heat, do they need clipping or is that misguided?

A Samoyed should never have to be clipped to cope with summer, the dogs coat is desgined to regulate it body temp and clipping it strips it of its natural insulation and sun protection.

Not to mention the fact they look frigging terrible.

EDT bad spelling again.....

Edited by Wolfsong

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Icemist   

Hi Diva,

As Wolfsong has pointed out, Sammie's should never be clipped.

A Samoyed has two coats, an Inner and an Outer.

During winter, a Sammy usually has its 2 coats to keep the cold away, and in the Summer, the Sammy will usually drop its inner coat to help with the heat.

As the are a light coloured dog, the heat does not effect them as badly as a darker coat, but also the outter coat then acts as heat isulation and protects the actual skin. If you shave or clip them, they have less chance to keep cool and more chance to catch Skin Cancer. A natural way to SLIP, SLOP, SLAP.

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Diva   
Hi Diva,

As Wolfsong has pointed out, Sammie's should never be clipped.

A Samoyed has two coats, an Inner and an Outer.

During winter, a Sammy usually has its 2 coats to keep the cold away, and in the Summer, the Sammy will usually drop its inner coat to help with the heat.

As the are a light coloured dog, the heat does not effect them as badly as a darker coat, but also the outter coat then acts as heat isulation and protects the actual skin. If you shave or clip them, they have less chance to keep cool and more chance to catch Skin Cancer. A natural way to SLIP, SLOP, SLAP.

Thanks, that was what I thought, my breed also drops their undercoat in summer and regrows their own 'doona' in winter, so I get that. They did look terrible, and it didn't seem like a good idea - maybe it was really an excuse to avoid the grooming work under the guise of helping them cope with the heat.

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Icemist   

You might be right with some cases Diva.

I would say some people do get a little lazy and shave them to avoid grooming.

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Diva   

It's a shame, they are so gorgeous in coat and well groomed.

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QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

First time owner so i will only answer questions from my own experience

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Very Happy Love kids they think that every one is thier new best friend

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

I walk mine every morning sometime at night as well, i have a small yard

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I think so, i dont find my dog dominant but she can be stubborn

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

They will happliy occupy themselves digging holes and destroying your garden if they are left alone for long periods :laugh:

They really just love you and want to be with you

9. How much grooming is required?

My dog gets brushed twice a week and bathed every 2-3 weeks 9depending how filthy she gets

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

They are excitable and love to play, they can be a bit over top for a small child but the child will learn

These are a beutiful dog i have only had staffy's, bullterriers and shepards growing up. The samoyed is the most loving dog I have ever come across.

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HI Icemist

My Sammy's Name Is Lyra and she is From Anaky Samoyed's in NSW, i live in Brisbane. We got Lyra when she was 6mths old, now looking at the Photos of the babies in the Samoyed thread i'm really thinking she would like a friend !!!!

Edited by Sammy_RSR

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Icemist   

The Samoyed scence in here is a bit quiet.

Does anyone have any photos they can put up of their Sammies.

Sammy RSR, did you find a friend for Lyra.

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Icemist   

Here's a photo of my young man Buster. He is 3 months of age when taken here.

My 4 year old son came up with his name.

post-28973-1253151682_thumb.jpg

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Bindii   

Buster is gorgeous :crossfingers:

I've got a photo which might be nice to share. I was always interested in how my boy compared to others at the same age, so this might be a bit of an understanding of how a Samoyed pup might grow up.

This is from 5 weeks old

monthbymonth-1.jpg

Edited by Bindii

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Bindii   

I should do these too! :crossfingers:

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

First time owner, newbie exhibitor, interested in breeding later on down the track..

Questions 2-4 see Icemist and Wolfsong answers

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

I haven't met an agressive Samoyed. They should all been friendly and very welcoming. As far Fletcher goes - he is *very* relaxed and independent. Ridiculously easy going. Loves spending time with us on the couch, but equally appreciates his 'alone time'. Perhaps it's just the way i've brought him up but he has no little quirks, i can clip his nails, brush him, pick him up by his ears (i'm kidding!!) I'm just comparing to my pug Hugo - you can't leave him in a different room, you can't clip his nails, you can't look in his mouth, he was brought up the same way Fletcher was, they're both just a loyal and loving, but it's nice the Fletcher doesn't stress when he needs to be alone etc. Honesty if they're all like Fletcher (which the seem to be) i don't think there is any dog that can compare :welcome:

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

We go for daily walks and zoomies around the house/small back yard occur frequently.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I think so. Every dog is a big responsibility. I think the coat might new dog owners off, but grooming in my mind is just one of many, many factors of being a good dog owner.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

No experience here, sorry! But i think he would be fine on his own so long as he gets lots of attention from the humans of the house!

9. How much grooming is required?

I brush Fletcher every day and i think a good comb a week would be adequate - but i do it probably more like every 4 days, because I love making him look pretty. I wash when i show which at the moment is about every 2 weeks. I'd probably wash every 3 weeks if i didn't show - because he's an inside dog, but we go to the lake and he swims and rolls in mud. Personally, i don't find the grooming a big deal, i find the time to watch TV for at least half an hour a day, so Fletcher can sit on my lap and have a brush at the same time for 10 minutes... big deal :)

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Fletcher gets huge cuddles from kids, he loves it. I don't have kids, but from children we have met along the way he has had this immediate understanding to be gentle and calm around kids.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Icemist wrote: "In Australia, Hip Displayia is the most common hereditary problem. Sensible breeders are aware of this and take steps in reducing the problem."

Fletcher, at 8 weeks, was tested for a portosystemic liver shunt. Most breeders in Victoria test for this. Do you know any more about it?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder?

Registered breeder? Can I meet the parents? Do you hip score parents? Vaccinated? Microchipped? For me, getting along with my breeder was an important thing, i liked feeling comfortable in asking lots of questions about my new puppy and beyond.

Edited by Bindii

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Icemist   
11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Icemist wrote: "In Australia, Hip Displayia is the most common hereditary problem. Sensible breeders are aware of this and take steps in reducing the problem."

Fletcher, at 8 weeks, was tested for a portosystemic liver shunt. Most breeders in Victoria test for this. Do you know any more about it?

Liver Shunts - This is a good topic.

Until a couple of months ago, I has never heard of this in our breed, But it could be that most breeders never talked about it, or new about it until now.

Since then I have only heard about one case.

Some discussion pionts - (and more learning for myself)

What is liver shunts?

What are the symptoms?

Do most breeders test for this?

How do you know breeders test for this? Do you go on face value or is there some paper proof?

Is it really all that common within the breed?

What other breeds are know to have this problem?

Is it hereditary? If it is, is there any proof, or is hereditary just something just to blame it on?

Can something else cause this problem?

How do you test for Liver Shunts?

What age do you test?

Can it be cured?

Is there a Samoyed register that these dogs go onto?

Were only in a small forum, but lets education ourselves and others with the problems within our breed.

Icemist

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Bjelkier   
11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Icemist wrote: "In Australia, Hip Displayia is the most common hereditary problem. Sensible breeders are aware of this and take steps in reducing the problem."

Fletcher, at 8 weeks, was tested for a portosystemic liver shunt. Most breeders in Victoria test for this. Do you know any more about it?

Liver Shunts - This is a good topic.

Until a couple of months ago, I has never heard of this in our breed, But it could be that most breeders never talked about it, or new about it until now.

Since then I have only heard about one case.

Some discussion pionts - (and more learning for myself)

What is liver shunts?

This is what I have found most informative so far.

http://www.vet.utk.edu/clinical/sacs/shunt/faq.php

From what I have read thus far it seems to be more of an issue in America then here but I could be wrong.

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