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Poodle (standard)

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capanash   

It does help to have an experienced mentor. The basic work required to grow and maintain poodle coat is not difficult, just time consuming, especially when poodles are going through coat change. There is a wonderful book written by Shirley Kahlstone which describes all aspects of coat care, a must for beginners.

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I've only met a few Standards and the adults I've met have been quite stand-offish with people they don't know and very, very reactive towards children. Is this typical of a Standard Poodle who has not grown up around children? Do they need a lot of socialisation to ensure that they are good with kids?

How much does the temperament vary between Toys, Miniatures & Standards?

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capanash   

Standard Poodles are extremely protective of their people and property. Don't confuse being protective with aggression, our poodles are very friendly with new people when we are with them. They will growl at strangers if approached without us.

None of our dogs have been raised with young children, only socialising with my nieces and nephews at family functions. They are all very happy to play with children at the park or at a show. You do have to be careful with small chidren, a big excited Standard can easily knock a child over accidentally. Freya has a wonderful relationship with a friend's 4yr old grand daughter who handles her at Poodle club members comps. My friend has Miniature poodles and says that Standards have a more even temperament.

Freya is a VCA certified Pets as Therapy dog, both Freya and Athena (her grand daughter) have passed the temperament test to become demonstration dogs for the Responsible Pet Ownership education program, can't do that with bad temperament.

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Dogs4Fun   
I've only met a few Standards and the adults I've met have been quite stand-offish with people they don't know and very, very reactive towards children. Is this typical of a Standard Poodle who has not grown up around children? Do they need a lot of socialisation to ensure that they are good with kids?

How much does the temperament vary between Toys, Miniatures & Standards?

None of the standards I have met (incuding my own) have been reactive towards people. The ones that have been socialised to sensible children are fine with children, as other breeds.

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Cool - just these ones that don't like kids then :) . They're fine with adults, though reserved, just not so fond of kids.

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Hastings   
My ex reckons he saw a Standard with SA once (being walked in St.Kilda). I have heard that it does crop up in some of the US lines.

I have a friend who had a Standard bred in Vic from imported USA lines via NSW, that was diagnosed with SA. He did not lose all his hair but had a very sparse tail and not much on the ears . He lived till 14.5 yrs and it really did not affect him.

We have tested for SA for years but now most of the Vets do not believe that it is a conclusive test . Hopefully their will be a DNA test one day

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Hastings   
I've only met a few Standards and the adults I've met have been quite stand-offish with people they don't know and very, very reactive towards children. Is this typical of a Standard Poodle who has not grown up around children? Do they need a lot of socialisation to ensure that they are good with kids?

How much does the temperament vary between Toys, Miniatures & Standards?

have to agree with Caroline in that Standards are very protective towards their owners, but if introduced to people are normally fine . We had a barbecue at our place a couple of years ago now and there were about 8 or 9 children there, they were playing football , I let my Standards out for a run and they all started to play ball with the kids, so we organised a match, dogs against kids, 6 Standards against the gang, Oh yes Caroline Rourke was included, they played for around 15 mins, then the kids declared the Standards the winners as they could not beat them to the ball.

My dogs were not used to kids at all and they surprised us all with their reaction to them.

I do not believe that every dog should like every person and have to say I am now more aware of my dogs likes and dislikes.

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Dogs4Fun   
I've only met a few Standards and the adults I've met have been quite stand-offish with people they don't know and very, very reactive towards children. Is this typical of a Standard Poodle who has not grown up around children? Do they need a lot of socialisation to ensure that they are good with kids?

How much does the temperament vary between Toys, Miniatures & Standards?

have to agree with Caroline in that Standards are very protective towards their owners, but if introduced to people are normally fine . We had a barbecue at our place a couple of years ago now and there were about 8 or 9 children there, they were playing football , I let my Standards out for a run and they all started to play ball with the kids, so we organised a match, dogs against kids, 6 Standards against the gang, Oh yes Caroline Rourke was included, they played for around 15 mins, then the kids declared the Standards the winners as they could not beat them to the ball.

My dogs were not used to kids at all and they surprised us all with their reaction to them.

I do not believe that every dog should like every person and have to say I am now more aware of my dogs likes and dislikes.

We had a kids birthday party at our place on the weekend, and due to the number of people, I didn't let the dogs in with everyone, as I could not supervise adequately. But they sure WANTED to be in there to get all of those sticky pats and cuddles. Most of the kids had a bit of one on one time with the fluffies and botht eh kids and dogs loved it.

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lester   

questions that a buyer needs to ask when considering buying a standard poodle puppy are:

1) can I see the parents? there is no good reason for not being able to see the mother. If you can't see her, and the pups are under 8 weeks, walk away right now. If the pups are over 8 weeks and mum lives elsewhere, obtain details and enter no commitments until you have seen her. The only good reason for not being able to see the father is that he lives at a great distance. Details about where he is should be provided and the buyer should be helped to follow up the father if he is not available. The parents' temperament is a fair indicator of what the puppies will be like.

2) Can I see the evidence of current health testing on both parents, in particular AVA or equivalent certificated hip scores, SA skin punch biopsy results, von Willibrands Disease result, a certified ophthalmological test of eye health covering PRA, entropion, cataract as a minimum.

Some "conventional wisdom" has been put forward in other postings that SA is not around and only some USA lines are likely to have it. This is an old chestnut. All modern standard poodles are from US lines. Some may have very small amounts of old English or European breeding, but it's not significant. The SA tests are not conclusive but they are the best we have and failure to apply them or any of the other tests shows a lack of commitment to breed health on the part of the breeder. An ethical and well organised breeder will happily provide copies of certificates that you can follow up for yourself.

3) Where do the dogs live day to day? Can I see it? If not - walk away. If you do see where the dogs ordinarily live, it should be comfortable and clean, no old poo lying around. It should be safe, it should be sheltered from heat, rain and wind and at the same time afford access to light, air, and enough space for running around. It should be clear that the parents and the puppies are part of an active household, not stuck away in a kennel out in a paddock. Only by living with people can they be properly socialised. All dogs and puppies should be clean and presentable.

4) Can I see the original pedigree of the mother showing the breeder as the owner? Can I see the service certificate showing the registered mating, and a copy (at least) of the father's pedigree? Obtain contact details for the father and write down the father's registered name and number from the pedigree copy that has been shown to you. You will want to contact the owner of the father and confirm all details. If the answer is "no" or a block to any of these, walk away. The breeder is not functioning responsibly as a registered breeder.

5) Can I see the breeder's ANKC/DogsNSW membership card? Does the breeder have a copy of the Code of Ethics and are they willing to show it to you? If the answer to any of these is "no," walk away. The breeder is not properly fulfilling their obligations as a registered breeder.

6) What is the vaccination and worming schedule for the puppies and are there vet certificates showing the schedule has been carried out?

7) Have the front dewclaws been removed? This is not essential but it can become an annoyance and a health risk later on if they have not been removed.

8) What are the parents and the puppies eating? Ask for a full diet chart. Check it with your vet.

9) Ask for a full care schedule for the growing pup and the adult poodle, including accommodation and safety, feeding, grooming, exercise, training and routine veterinary visits.

10) Ask what commitment the breeder is offering to "after sales service." Obtain a written statement of circumstances under which the breeder will take the puppy back with a full, partial or no refund.

That's 10 basic questions to start off with.

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Thats a great list Lester :thumbsup:

My Stds are very protective at home, one of my girls would not let you in the yard if i was not home!! But when out on a walk or at the park she wants to be everyones friend :scold:

Yes they can be boisterous around small humans :mad which is a bummer....thats the type of humans mine like the best :bolt: ......its a shame so many kids now a days seemed so scared of "big dogs"

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Darkrai   

If you put in the time and training any standard can do obed. or agility.

There are a couple of breeders that do conformation and obed/agility.

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Zug Zug   

Thanks - I'm just starting to look around for my next puppy. Did I say that out loud?

Early days yet - but if I don't do something in the next year or two I will be still trying to train with my old girl while she nurses a broken hip! (Not seriously, but she's getting on a bit and my enthusiasm isn't waning...)

So I'm starting to fish around. Not really sure where to start. I might ask some people at my dog club too. There aren't many standards competing in obedience in SA (only one I can think of - and she's beautiful to watch). Perhaps there are more interstate?

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~tj~   

Heya

Just a question for those with standards - do your dogs have issues with runny eyes? My Willow gets quite crusty eyes and they arent infected. We just wash them with some warm water and a cloth each night.. :)

Any hints or tips?? :rofl:

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Heya

Just a question for those with standards - do your dogs have issues with runny eyes? My Willow gets quite crusty eyes and they arent infected. We just wash them with some warm water and a cloth each night.. :)

Any hints or tips?? :rofl:

Is that your Standard in your avatar? If so, the problem could be the woolly face! It's better to keep the face clipped short, as the excess wool can irritate the eyes.

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~tj~   

Nah thats my Yoshi :hug: My standard is clipped back :) As is Yoshi now... they both get bear cuts and look cute as a button :)

One thing I thought of was allergies?? My DP and baby are suffering terribly at the moment from hayfever (Very weird...) Do you think it could be the same thing?

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Nah thats my Yoshi :eek: My standard is clipped back :mad As is Yoshi now... they both get bear cuts and look cute as a button :o

One thing I thought of was allergies?? My DP and baby are suffering terribly at the moment from hayfever (Very weird...) Do you think it could be the same thing?

Poodles can get what I always call "gungy eye" - bathe the eye with saline &, if the eye is irritated, use can use Brolene eye drops

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~tj~   

Thanks PoodleMum!! Gungy eye describes it well :flame: its kinda black and like dried sleep :)

Brolene *puts in iphone notepad to remember*

THANKS!

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Thanks - I'm just starting to look around for my next puppy. Did I say that out loud?

Early days yet - but if I don't do something in the next year or two I will be still trying to train with my old girl while she nurses a broken hip! (Not seriously, but she's getting on a bit and my enthusiasm isn't waning...)

So I'm starting to fish around. Not really sure where to start. I might ask some people at my dog club too. There aren't many standards competing in obedience in SA (only one I can think of - and she's beautiful to watch). Perhaps there are more interstate?

Margaret Foord in Sydney is a notable obedience competitor who has put UDs on Standard Poodles. She breeds too. Her prefix is Kellyvix.

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