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Troy

Australian Kelpie

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Troy   

The Australian Kelpie

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=133 )

Group: Group 5 (Working Dogs)

General Appearance: The general appearance shall be that of a lithe, active dog of great quality, showing hard muscular condition combined with great suppleness of limb and conveying the capability of untiring work. It must be free from any suggestion of weediness.

Characteristics: The Kelpie is extremely alert, eager and highly intelligent, with a mild, tractable disposition and an almost inexhaustible energy, with marked loyalty and devotion to duty. It has a natural instinct and aptitude in the working of sheep, both in open country and in the yard. Any defect of structure or temperament foreign to a working dog must be regarded as uncharacteristic.

Temperament: (See under characteristics)

Head And Skull: The head is in proportion to the size of the dog, the skull slightly rounded, and broad between the ears. The forehead running in a straight profile towards a pronounced stop. The cheeks are neither coarse nor prominent, but round to the foreface, which is cleanly chiselled and defined. The muzzle, preferably slightly shorter in length than the skull. Lips tight and clean and free from looseness. The nose colouring conforms to that of the body coat. The overall shape and contours produce a rather fox-like expression, which is softened by the almond-shaped eyes.

Eyes: The eyes are almond shaped, of medium size, clearly defined at the corners, and show an intelligent and eager expression. The colour of the eyes to be brown, harmonising with the colour of the coat. In the case of blue dogs a lighter coloured eye is permissible.

Ears: The ears are pricked and running to a fine point at the tips, the leather fine but strong at the base, set wide apart on the skull and inclining outwards, slightly curved on the outer edge and of moderate size. The inside of the ears is well furnished with hair.

Mouth: The teeth should be sound, strong and evenly spaced, the lower incisors just behind but touching the upper, that is a scissor bite.

Neck: The neck is of moderate length, strong, slightly arched, gradually moulding into the shoulders, free from throatiness and showing a fair amount of ruff.

Forequarters: The shoulders should be clean, muscular, well sloping with the shoulder blades close set at the withers. The upper arm should be at a right angle with the shoulder blade. Elbows neither in nor out. The forelegs should be muscular with strong but refined bone, straight and parallel when viewed from the front. When viewed from the side, the pasterns should show a slight slope to ensure flexibility of movement and the ability to turn quickly.

Body: The ribs are well sprung and the chest must be deep rather than wide, with a firm level topline, strong and well-muscled loins and good depth of flank. The length of the dog from the forechest in a straight line to the buttocks, is greater than the height at the withers as 10 is to 9.

Hindquarters: The hindquarters should show breadth and strength, with the croup rather long and sloping, the stifles well turned and the hocks fairly well let down. When viewed from behind, the hind legs, from the hocks to the feet, are straight and placed parallel, neither close nor too wide apart.

Feet: The feet should be round, strong, deep in pads, with close knit, well arched toes and strong short nails.

Tail: The tail during rest should hang in a very slight curve. During movement or excitement it may be raised, but under no circumstances should the tail be carried past a vertical line drawn through the root. It should be furnished with a good brush. Set on position to blend with sloping croup, and it should reach approximately to the hock.

Gait/Movement: To produce the almost limitless stamina demanded of a working sheepdog in wide open spaces the Kelpie must be perfectly sound, both in construction and movement. Any tendency to cow hocks, bow hocks, stiltiness, loose shoulders or restricted movement weaving or plaiting is a serious fault. Movement should be free and tireless and the dog must have the ability to turn suddenly at speed. When trotting the feet tend to come closer together at ground level as speed increases but when the dog comes to rest it stands four square.

Coat: The coat is a double coat with a short dense undercoat. The outercoat is close, each hair straight, hard, and lying flat, so that it is rain-resisting. Under the body, to behind the legs, the coat is longer and forms near the thigh a mild form of breeching. On the head (including the inside of the ears), to the front of the legs and feet, the hair is short. Along the neck it is longer and thicker forming a ruff. The tail should be furnished with a good brush. A coat either too long or too short is a fault. As an average, the hairs on the body should be from 2 to 3 cms (approx. 0.75 - 1.25 ins) in length.

Colour: Black, black and tan, red, red and tan, fawn, chocolate, and smoke blue.

Sizes: Height: Dogs 46-51 cms (approx. 18-20 ins) at withers

Bitches 43-48 cms (approx. 17-19 ins) at withers

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Have owned a kelpie for 7 years.

We worked him on large dairy farms in NZ.

He was also very successfully shown and was a reserve Challenge, reserve Best in Specialty Show winner.

One of my first judging appointments as a new judge over 9 years ago was a Kelpie Ribbon Parade

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

The Breed ws developed in Australia in the 1800's. Apprantly two Collie type dogs were brought in to Australia. A dog was mated to a working bitch called kelpie

3. How common is it in Australia?

Extremely common

4. What is the average lifespan?

To my knowledge at least 8 years old

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

In my opinion the kelpie is an extremely focused hard working dog that will bond to only a few. Very loyal to their master but also very stubborn. Can be very head strong and needs a firm owner.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

We worked our Kelpie every day up to 6 or 7 hours. He thrived to work.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

In my opinion they need mental and physical stimulation.

9. How much grooming is required?

A daily brush. More attention required when shedding.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

I feel they my not bond with young family as much as a single person. Can be quite possessive.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Edited by stonebridge

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Kavik   

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I own a Kelpie and a Kelpie X

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Developed to work sheep in Australia, from short haired Collie types.

3. How common is it in Australia?

Very common.

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Very active, keen, enthusiastic dogs, always ready to work/play.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Kelpies thrive and require a good deal of mental and physical activity. They excel at sports such as agility, flyball and of course herding.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Not easily cope with, no. With dedication and work, if they were keen on getting into sports might work.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

Not much grooming needed.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

They can be quite boisterous and would need training and supervision around young children and infirm people.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

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Rozzie   

4. What is the average lifespan?

We have had two live to 16 and 15 years.

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1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I started with my first purebred show kelpie in 2000 (I had a working kelpie and part bred before that) I have bred 5 litters and campaigned in Showing, obedience, agility, herding and endurance, gaining many titles with my dogs along the way.I have bred 1 Grand Champion, 4 Champions and exported overseas. My dogs are not kept in kennels, they are in the yard or in my house and firstly my beloved pets.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

In Australia to work sheep in our harsh and vast environment.

3. How common is it in Australia?

Very common, but unless you have a black and tan or red and tan, most people dont recognise them.

4. What is the average lifespan?

Around 15 years, but can live up to 20.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Outgoing and friendly, excellent family pet, great with kids and other animals. Love to please but also have an independant streak, which they need for working (often bringing in sheep by themselves). In obedience and agility this can come out as "I know what I am doing, just please get out of my way or keep up"

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

I believe this is where the working kelpie and show kelpie differ. As a rule working kelpies tend to required more exercise as they have been bred for generation after generation to work and they need something to do. If you dont have stock for them to work, then they will thrive on lots of obedience or agility, just exercise is not enough, they need brain work. The show kelpie tends to be more laid back, and while energetic, they can easily do well on just a walk and some play time in the back yard, more important is mental stimulation and quality time with you, they really need to be part of the family. My dogs are great couch potatoes, they will spend all day at my feet or on the couch just so they can be with me. Obviously this is only a general rule, i have come across very laid back working dogs and very highly strung show dogs.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Yes I believe it is as long as they realise they cant just leave them in the backyard and ignore them, the Kelpie is not a dog to be ignored or it will find its own enterainment.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

As long as they are given something to do and play with. And when you get home you give them all the attention they require. Most people who have bought pups from me work full time and so the puppy spends a good deal of time at home alone, and the pups have coped very well.

9. How much grooming is required?

A quick brush out once a week, everyday when shedding. An occasional bath if they are getting a bit whiffy. Even my show dogs dont get bathed every week.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Sometimes they can be boisterous when young, but all dogs should be supervised with small children. As an adult the kelpie can be very gentle and patient. They make excellent therapy dogs.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Not much in the way of herditary problems with kelpies, high hip scores can come up in some bloodlines, but as they are a smaller athletic dog, this doesnt always have an affect on them.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Not much testing is done in the kelpie, as they are a very sound breed. You can ask if the breeding stock is hipscored and most of us are doing so now, but many dont. They are not a breed prone to deafness or blindness or have heart problems. I think the most important thing is the temperment of the breed.

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5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Outgoing and friendly, excellent family pet, great with kids and other animals. Love to please but also have an independant streak, which they need for working (often bringing in sheep by themselves). In obedience and agility this can come out as "I know what I am doing, just please get out of my way or keep up"

kelpiesrule, how do you effectively deal with the independent streak in a kelpie?

Eg. I had Tilly at a park today (not a dog park, but people do walk or play the odd game of fetch with their dogs there) and Tilly got totally fixated on this old labrador that was playing fetch with it's owner as they walked through the park. Tilly rounded up the labrador non-stop as the man walked through the park, she ran rings around them the whole time. When Tilly goes to run with a dog that is playing fetch I normally keep my distance from her and call her, and walk in the opposite direction from her, or try to get her to focus on chasing her own ball. Or if i'm near the other dog owner and it's obvious that the other dog owner is happy for Tilly to run with their dog, then she will happily run with other dogs, but will keep an eye on me and will follow when it's time to leave.

I just couldn't snap her out of it today. I've had a cold for several days now, with a sore throat so my voice isn't very strong at the moment and i've felt a bit rundown from it. The owner walked back towards me briefly, and smiled as he said she had too much kelpie in her. I apologised and reassured him that she would come back to me when she knew he was leaving...sure enough as soon as he began to leave the park, Tilly ran really fast towards me and seemed to have her listening ears turned on again :) .

Tilly listens to me so well at home and listens at the park, provided she is not seriously distracted. I just always seem to have some minor trouble when I take her out, due to how independent she can be.

Edited by fainty_girl

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Guest rhapsodical78   
Guest rhapsodical78

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

First-time owner - long-time admirer.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

The breed was first developed in the 1800's as a herding breed which could withstand the often harsh conditions of outback sheep stations and which had the endurance, intelligence and stamina to work tirelessly on large flocks. The history of the Kelpie is well documented and can be traced back to a Casterton Station worker called Jack gleeson who mated his black dog named 'Kelpie' with one of the local collies. The resulting offspring were called 'Kelpies' - a name taken from a mythological creature featured in the writings of the Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson.

As previously mentioned, there are two strains of Kelpies - the Show Kelpie (or Bench Kelpies, as they are sometimes known) and the Working Kelpie. The introduction of the Kelpie to the show ring created much furore among many farmers and Working dog enthusiasts as there was concern that aesthetic-based breeding would weaken the breed's drive and instincts. Other concerns included the fear that Bench Bred Kelpie blood would inadevertenly find its way back in to working strains thereby diluting the breed's working ability or that those searching for a working dog might be deceived by show ribbons and titles into believing that they were purchasing a top working dog.

Most breeders who breed Show-line Kelpies will aknowledge the differences between the two strains. The Show Kelpie is said to be, on average, less active, with a lower drive to work - however some Show-bred Kelpies can make great working dogs, whilst some working-bred Kelpies are not cut out for the farm.

I personally believe that there is a place for both strains of dog in Australia today - with the Show-bred Kelpie requiring less stimulation and activity for families but retaining their loyalty in the home and their biddability in the obedience and agility ring.

Working-bred Kelpies, bred for ability, can be almost any colour, including cream, black, red, blue, fawn, black and tan, blue and tan, red and tan with various patches of white, however black and tan and red and tan tend to predominate. Show-line Kelpies tend to look heavier-set than Working-line Kelpies and are more common in solid coats such as black and red.

3. How common is it in Australia?

Kelpies are extremely common in Australia, often found in shelters and rescues across the country. Oddly, they have not made it overseas in great numbers and remain largely unknown in Europe and the United States.

4. What is the average lifespan?

The average lifespan is said to be around 12 years, but individuals may live longer.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

As mentioned above the temperament can differ within Show and Working-line Kelpies. Kelpies are generally loyal, biddable, active, extremely intelligent and can be independent in their thinking. Kelpies can be protective of their property and family. It is important for Kelpies to be part of the family and if managed correctly they will be gentle and tolerant with children. Although they like to be part of the action, they are not an overly demonstrative breed and do not generally demand affection but injoy interacting with their family on a more active or cognitive level.

A well-balanced/bred Kelpie should not be timid or overtly aggressive but has more fight than flight when confronted.

Kelpies do not always seek the company of those outside their family and can sometimes be a one-person dog.

Show-line Kelpies tend to demonstrate less desire to work.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Working Kelpies require hours of mental and physical stimulation a day and require a dedicated suburban owner or a busy farm-life to be content. Show-line Kelpies tend to be happier with an hour's intense activity and frequent mental stimulation throughout an average day.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

This can be a breed for a first time owner as long as they are fully aware of the requirements of the Kelpie and are willing to dedicate the time and effort into the care of the dog to ensure that no behavioural problems occur. Kelpies often require a firm and consistent leader and are thought to be a 'harder' dog than the Border Collie.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Again, Working-line Kelpies can require frequent stimulation whereas Show-line Kelpies often require less. However, even a Show-bred Kelpie will generally not be content to be home alone for long periods of time with no stimulation.

9. How much grooming is required?

Kelpies are average shedders, but their short, weather-resistant coat is easy to maintain with a weekly brush.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Kelpies are active dogs so may require training around small children and the elderly - but generally learn very quickly what is required of them. Herding and nipping of children should be discouraged from an early age.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Kelpies, having a strong working heritage, do not have many hereditary health complaints. However, diseases such as Cerebellar Abiotrophy and Hip Dysplasia can crop up in the breed. Generally, reputable Show-line breeders tend to test for Hip Dysplasia but individuals can be afflicted with a genetic throwback to past generations.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

This depends upon one's reasons's for acquiring a Kelpie. It is my opinion that those who are looking for a dog to work stock should look to Working-line breeders who have a strong history of success in working their dogs. Those searching for a family pet, companion or performance dog can look to the Show-line Kelpie, ensuring the breeder has provided adequate early socialisation and has had their breeding stock hip and elbow scored. Generally a breeder should be able to select a puppy which demonstrates the required attributes for purchaser's purpose. People who want a competition dog should look for a breeder who has demonstrated success with their dogs in this area.

Edited by rhapsodical78

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5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Outgoing and friendly, excellent family pet, great with kids and other animals. Love to please but also have an independant streak, which they need for working (often bringing in sheep by themselves). In obedience and agility this can come out as "I know what I am doing, just please get out of my way or keep up"

kelpiesrule, how do you effectively deal with the independent streak in a kelpie?

Eg. I had Tilly at a park today (not a dog park, but people do walk or play the odd game of fetch with their dogs there) and Tilly got totally fixated on this old labrador that was playing fetch with it's owner as they walked through the park. Tilly rounded up the labrador non-stop as the man walked through the park, she ran rings around them the whole time. When Tilly goes to run with a dog that is playing fetch I normally keep my distance from her and call her, and walk in the opposite direction from her, or try to get her to focus on chasing her own ball. Or if i'm near the other dog owner and it's obvious that the other dog owner is happy for Tilly to run with their dog, then she will happily run with other dogs, but will keep an eye on me and will follow when it's time to leave.

I just couldn't snap her out of it today. I've had a cold for several days now, with a sore throat so my voice isn't very strong at the moment and i've felt a bit rundown from it. The owner walked back towards me briefly, and smiled as he said she had too much kelpie in her. I apologised and reassured him that she would come back to me when she knew he was leaving...sure enough as soon as he began to leave the park, Tilly ran really fast towards me and seemed to have her listening ears turned on again :) .

Tilly listens to me so well at home and listens at the park, provided she is not seriously distracted. I just always seem to have some minor trouble when I take her out, due to how independent she can be.

This can be a very difficult thing to deal with in a kelpie, but no so bad as in other breeds. You need to be more exciting to be around than the distractions, and that can be hard. With my guys, from babies they are taught that coming when called is the most fun thing to do and they get heaps pats and yummy treats. With 'teenage' dogs or dogs you havent had from puppies, it can be a little more difficult at home. Unfortunately people seem to think off lead parks are a great and easy way to exercise their dogs, but unless your dogs are highly trained on recall and really focused on wanting to be with you, all it does is teach the dog that this is their playtime and you have nothing to do with it and they dont have to come to you as you cant make them and they are having way too much fun :laugh: . Off lead parks used incorrectly can cause alot of problems.

In situations like this park you were at with Tilly, I would be taking my dog on a very long lead... about 20m and let her run a play around you, but if she wants to run off and play with another dog, then you can call her and have control when she doesnt listen. Most people that go to parks to play with their dogs dont want some silly kelpie (or other breed :love:) coming along and joining in on the game. So Tilly needs to learn some manners, she needs to learn when you say it is ok for her to play and when it is not. I would never let my dog off lead until I had that kind of control. Most of what you are doing with Tilly is good but you really need to do more long lead work. Park time needs to be for YOU and her, not HER and the other dogs.

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QUESTIONS

3. How common is it in Australia?

Kelpies are extremely common in Australia, often found in shelters and rescues across the country. Oddly, they have not made it overseas in great numbers and remain largely unknown in Europe and the United States.

Actually Rhapsodical, the kelpie is VERY well known in Europe and Scandanavian countries, there are probably as many kelpies in Sweden, Finland and other similar countries as there are in Australia ! They are very well loved dogs over there. The working kelpie is loved in America for its tough working ability. But yes, this dog is relatively unknown in most countries, although they do tend to turn up alot in Pounds and Rescue places overseas.

It is such a shame to find these beautiful dogs in Shelters, but probably due to the fact people are not prepared for the energy of working kelpies.

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Guest rhapsodical78   
Guest rhapsodical78
QUESTIONS

3. How common is it in Australia?

Kelpies are extremely common in Australia, often found in shelters and rescues across the country. Oddly, they have not made it overseas in great numbers and remain largely unknown in Europe and the United States.

Actually Rhapsodical, the kelpie is VERY well known in Europe and Scandanavian countries, there are probably as many kelpies in Sweden, Finland and other similar countries as there are in Australia ! They are very well loved dogs over there. The working kelpie is loved in America for its tough working ability. But yes, this dog is relatively unknown in most countries, although they do tend to turn up alot in Pounds and Rescue places overseas.

It is such a shame to find these beautiful dogs in Shelters, but probably due to the fact people are not prepared for the energy of working kelpies.

In some of the Northern areas I know there are Kelpies, but in the rest of Europe, as far as I'm aware, they're pretty uncommon. Europe is a big place! Most Americans I have spoken to have never heard of Kelpie, and these people are dog community members. I know some farmers use them, but they're considered a fairly rare and specialised breed.

I agree, it's terrible to see so many of them in shelters. I think it doesn't help that there are so many around that they're sold so cheaply or given away to unsuspecting owners looking for an average family pet. The Kelpie is anything but average and they require much more dedication than your average family is generally willing to offer. :laugh:

Edited by rhapsodical78

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I agree, it's terrible to see so many of them in shelters. I think it doesn't help that there are so many around that they're sold so cheaply or given away to unsuspecting owners looking for an average family pet. The Kelpie is anything but average and they require much more dedication than your average family is generally willing to offer. :thumbsup:

Very sad for such a special dog.

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Jumabaar   

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I got my first Kepie (working) when I was 5. Now breed, show and do dogsports with four Kelpies.

4. What is the average lifespan?

I lost my first girl at 13 from an allergic reaction- but she was quite healthy at that age and I think she had quite a few years left in her.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

They are generally very Intelligent (opening doors, training humans etc) In my experience they seem to settle down and mature around 4yrs of age. At this age they seem to become more comfortable in their own skin. Overall they have a very good temp so long as they have been well socialised as a pup and have come from good stock.

I think they are very different to train than most breeds ie the Border Collie. A kelpie wants to please however if they think it is not worth it or that it is a stupid command they will not follow it. This may come out in agility where they will ‘add’ jumps if you are not fast enough giving commands. It does not make them difficult to train however they will get bored with repetition. Once they have decided that something is ‘work’ they will do it perfectly, generally without mistakes.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

I do dog sports and they will take as much work as you will give them. I know from experience though that 20minutes of herding or agility will tire them more than an hr long bike ride!! They (should) have been bred with an off switch- you work at full throttle and when you get home you rest so that you can get the energy to go at full throttle when you next go out. I have found this true with both the working and show dogs that i have owned and met. If your Kelpie is being destructive- digging to china, barking non-stop, pulling clothes off the line- then the best bet is that it is bored and/or has way too much energy from not getting enough exercise.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Yes- so long as they have met a few before and are willing to put in the time to keep them stimulated. WARNING: Kelpies train humans very well and so it is important for new owners to realise this and make sure it is them training the Kelpie

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Two of my dogs have been only dogs and it just means that you have to do more with them than if you had two to occupy them. I didnt have problems however if the dog is not getting enough attention they will let you know.

9. How much grooming is required?

I bath every 6mths or when they roll in something disgusting!!! They do have alot of fur when they moult- I have mine indoors and the fur bunnies are currently breeding like crazy and I am vacuuming every day. But when not losing their coat I do very little grooming (even for shows).

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

I was always with my Kelpie as a child- she would lead me round by my hand and would 'herd' me. I got her after I was bitten by a BC so I would not be scared of dogs (and it worked) She was always very gentle. I think that if they grow up with polite kids they are very good family members however they can be boisterous in their teenage yrs and rules need to be in place by then. As with anything they need to be exposed to children if you decide to have children when the dog is mature. My grandparents have a kelpie and he is very gentle with them however will jump all over me- all my dogs seem to be aware of people that they must be gentle with. I hope to have one of mine become a Delta Dog in the near future.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

There are a few genetic diseases such as Cerebellar Aboitrophy in both working and Show Kelpie and Krabbe Disease in working lines. There is no test for CA however pups develop symptoms by 8wks of age and so breeders should be able to see this, and there should be a test for Krabbe in the next yr or so.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

I would want to see the parents- depending on your needs there are many different lines with different personalities and level of drive.

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This can be a very difficult thing to deal with in a kelpie, but no so bad as in other breeds. You need to be more exciting to be around than the distractions, and that can be hard. With my guys, from babies they are taught that coming when called is the most fun thing to do and they get heaps pats and yummy treats. With 'teenage' dogs or dogs you havent had from puppies, it can be a little more difficult at home. Unfortunately people seem to think off lead parks are a great and easy way to exercise their dogs, but unless your dogs are highly trained on recall and really focused on wanting to be with you, all it does is teach the dog that this is their playtime and you have nothing to do with it and they dont have to come to you as you cant make them and they are having way too much fun :love: . Off lead parks used incorrectly can cause alot of problems.

In situations like this park you were at with Tilly, I would be taking my dog on a very long lead... about 20m and let her run a play around you, but if she wants to run off and play with another dog, then you can call her and have control when she doesnt listen. Most people that go to parks to play with their dogs dont want some silly kelpie (or other breed :)) coming along and joining in on the game. So Tilly needs to learn some manners, she needs to learn when you say it is ok for her to play and when it is not. I would never let my dog off lead until I had that kind of control. Most of what you are doing with Tilly is good but you really need to do more long lead work. Park time needs to be for YOU and her, not HER and the other dogs.

Thanks kelpiesrule :( .

When I'm out with Tilly she is not that interested in dog treats (now this sounds weird, but she loves banana and the few times i've taken one with me it has definitely gotten her attention way more than any dog treat). She is definitely responsive to being told "good girl" etc in a more excited voice and pats though, so this helps with her recall.

The past couple of days i've tried to be extra positive with her at the park when she is listening well, and she was particularly good for me this morning. The other day she had gone to round up this dog a few times and wasn't listening, so I called her and went towards the car to leave. She went up to this same dog today, had a very polite sniff and then came back to me, and even though she did start to run over towards the dog again a couple of times she stopped and came back to me when called.

I'm also trying to get her walking better on the leash (stop her pulling) while also getting her to see the leash as a positive thing. I think she really picked up on how frustrated I was with walking her, plus when I used to take her to dog parks and was having issues with her getting into scuffles with particular dogs, I obviously had to put her on the leash and leave. When she sees a harness/leash she is quite reluctant to wear it, but she loves going for walks. Just by trying a different method with walking her on the lead, she has definitely improved.

I also agree with what you said about park time, and its actually one of the reasons I avoid dog parks now (I just take her to an ordinary park that has the odd dog strolling through). I take her to this park because there are less distractions around her and it definitely keeps her more focused than she would be at a busy dog park. I actually asked my dad to come with me to the park the other day for a bit of support/advice for managing Tilly and he could see that Tilly was listening to me more than she used to when we first got her and that she had definitely improved.

Sorry my postings about Tilly always seem so negative... :love: . She really means a lot to me, so I tend to worry about minor things a lot. She is actually a really lovely dog, contrary to what I always seem to post. :)

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Guest rhapsodical78   
Guest rhapsodical78
Sorry my postings about Tilly always seem so negative... :) . She really means a lot to me, so I tend to worry about minor things a lot. She is actually a really lovely dog, contrary to what I always seem to post. :)

I think your dedication to Tilly has always been very clear. She seems like a great dog. :laugh:

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Sorry my postings about Tilly always seem so negative... :) . She really means a lot to me, so I tend to worry about minor things a lot. She is actually a really lovely dog, contrary to what I always seem to post. :)

I think your dedication to Tilly has always been very clear. She seems like a great dog. :laugh:

I agree... you are doing a great job with Tilly, and the fact she is getting better shows that. One day the penny will drop with her and she will understand that all you ask from her is to listen to you. She will settle down, she is just young and loves life.

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But are there now two styles of Kelpie?

The ANKC one which has less drive and is a different style and coloured dog and the working kelpie which has original variances of teh breed and original colour and a higher drive!

We see and rescue loads of KElpies out in teh country and tehy are true working dogs but not like the standard

Edited by pikespooches

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Sorry my postings about Tilly always seem so negative... ;) . She really means a lot to me, so I tend to worry about minor things a lot. She is actually a really lovely dog, contrary to what I always seem to post. :hug:

I think your dedication to Tilly has always been very clear. She seems like a great dog. :laugh:

I agree... you are doing a great job with Tilly, and the fact she is getting better shows that. One day the penny will drop with her and she will understand that all you ask from her is to listen to you. She will settle down, she is just young and loves life.

Thanks kelpiesrule and rhapsodical78 :eek: .

The penny has definitely dropped when it comes to Tilly listening at home, but outside the home she is different again...in some ways she even listens at home more than Jessie at times. When I get their dinner ready in the evening, I've started to get Tilly and Jessie to sit and wait for their dinner at a distance from me, rather than them being right near me and overexcited. Tilly is the one who sits there beautifully waiting for her dinner, while Jessie creeps closer to me crying. :)

Edited by fainty_girl

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Eleni   

Its funny actually i have rehomed quite a few kelpies and 99.9% of them have been to previous owners of kelpies. The funny thing is a general rule people see Labs as the family dog and i had a lady ask me the other day that had a Lab if a Kelpie would be too much dog for her, my response was if you have had a Lab you can handle a Kelpie. Labs are just as much if not more work than a Kelpie and at least Kelpies grow up and mature a lot quicker than the Labs. I find like all active dogs including Labs if trained properly in the first place in manners and obedience and given daily exercise and stimulation they make fantastic dogs and members of the family. My own Kelpie girl tells me if i am not paying her enough attention and giving her enough exercise and she makes it very clear!! In all the write ups here i can definately agree about the independent streak etc when it comes to her. When people read up on the Kelpies for example on the internet they see the statement they need to run 60km per day and think oh my god i cant do this, but the majority of them dont need this with general daily exercise and stimulation they are great, and with this breed being so intellegent and willing to please it makes training a pleasure

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Its funny actually i have rehomed quite a few kelpies and 99.9% of them have been to previous owners of kelpies. The funny thing is a general rule people see Labs as the family dog and i had a lady ask me the other day that had a Lab if a Kelpie would be too much dog for her, my response was if you have had a Lab you can handle a Kelpie. Labs are just as much if not more work than a Kelpie and at least Kelpies grow up and mature a lot quicker than the Labs. I find like all active dogs including Labs if trained properly in the first place in manners and obedience and given daily exercise and stimulation they make fantastic dogs and members of the family. My own Kelpie girl tells me if i am not paying her enough attention and giving her enough exercise and she makes it very clear!! In all the write ups here i can definately agree about the independent streak etc when it comes to her. When people read up on the Kelpies for example on the internet they see the statement they need to run 60km per day and think oh my god i cant do this, but the majority of them dont need this with general daily exercise and stimulation they are great, and with this breed being so intellegent and willing to please it makes training a pleasure

There is just something so lovable about kelpies...I grew up with a Kelpie X, we got her from the pound when she was about 1 and she was 15 when she got sick and had to be PTS :laugh: . She was very clever and intuitive, but not a cuddly type of dog. Her idea of being affectionate was sitting on your feet or leaning against me during a car-ride to school. She was very obedient, as long as she wanted to do what you were asking.

I still miss her :) .

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