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Troy

German Shorthaired Pointer

69 posts in this topic

VJB   
Do colour variances have different peronalities? Although its GSP's here is the temperment different to german Wire hair pointers?

What is the price range of a GSP.

Are they an easy breed to train or do they get distracted easily while training?

I'm not a big believer in colour variances having different personalities. From any research I've done, the GWP are different from the GSP, but someone else will have more knowledge than me on this one.

Price range. $800 - $1000.

They are a very eager to please, enthusiastic breed, so training should not be too difficult if you are clear on what message you are trying to send to your dog, and how easy it is depends on what your dog works best with and how good the communication is between you and the dog. Consistency is the key though, as with most dogs. Some can be stubborn at times, Heidi tests the boundaries just for the fun of it I'm sure. :love: If things are kept interesting enough, I find focus not an issue.

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FionaC   
can we have some pics :cry:

I've seen a lot of Liver and Whites does anyone here have Black and White?

Photos I can do ...... & a couple on the GSP thread have Black and Whites (GSPx3, Tambaqui & BJ just off the top of my head have B&W ones)

This is my boy - Fenrik Chequer Board - liver & white in colour and almost 13mths old

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In obedience class

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In his winter coat

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Morty & his litter sister Fyx (owned by a DOL'er)

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Tambaqui   

I do have a couple of photos of my gorgeous and loving GSP!

This one is her doing a show stack, however I won't be showing her anymore and she has been booked in to be spayed. However I am now going to work in obedience with her and have her prepared for Obedience Trials. Utility and Agility is also on top of the list of things to do with Bella! She is very smart, but has a bad habit of distraction!

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Here was when she was in the house, but she is now outside with another dog, and prefers to be outside:

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Here, a close shot of her head, don't mind the backyard, she spends her day digging holes in the rain to annoy me with mud on her from head to toe!

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Also here, a shot of her at the show:

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My Bella is more of a tomboy than a gorgeous girl :cry:!

Edited by Tambaqui

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Tambaqui, please dont refer to all GSPs as over the top and hyperactive, Most GSP's I know are active and intelligent.

I've had four now and none have been over the top or hyperactive. :o

I would most certainly agree i often have my two godsons over at 9 months and 2 years of age and my girls are fabulous with them, even my boisterous six month old puppy. As with any dog/child combination they are never left unattended together but they genuinely take good care around the two boys.

Most of the questions have been answered but i can contribute to photos :cry:

My three girls

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Acewild Ella Enchanted aka Flute aka The Flute Loop aka The Tasmanian Devil

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Sarah L   

and some more

She love's to share with dogs and humans a like. Has the most greatest dog to dog skills that I have ever seen in a dog this she had from birth and has never changed. Children OMG! I am so proud of her as I don't have any and she is great with them too.

Fiona just love the pic of her and Mort on their first birthday that one is superb.

Fyx in general has good skills all round with dogs and humans. Yet still I have so much training to do with her to get her to everyone else's expectations. I am so proud of my little girl and her breeding it has certainly made a difference.

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Edited by Sarah L

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After having Beagles for so many years it has been a real treat having Quinn our GSP pup.

Since being introduced into the wide world of dog sport...we have met a lot of interesting people and groups. Having fallen in with retrieving enthusiasts we started looking at retrieving breeds. This is when Quinn became a member of our family. Before a show I have to remember to check her feet as they are often muddy from afternoons in the field just being a GSP.

She's a bit silly out on the obedience paddock but she's only 7 months old. But gee for someone nearly 6 feet tall it's really nice having a tall dog to train for once. :thumbsup:

She's amazing and heaps of fun!

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Edited by BeagleBoys2

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FHRP   

Some more photo's. Liver and white heavily roaned.

baby :laugh:

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A bit older

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5mths

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12mths

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nearly 2

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Hotwyr   
I'm not a big believer in colour variances having different personalities. From any research I've done, the GWP are different from the GSP, but someone else will have more knowledge than me on this one.

Hi there,

yes GWP are very different to GSP and if you research the Mother Country information (on GWP) you will see that the Black colour has been linked to agression. Not only that but Black is dominant so in breeding GWP you are not allowed to breed Black to Black or solid liver to black..... Solid Black puppies are not allowed in the breed standard either. I have a kennel of 10 GWP, only one is a Black/White the rest are Liver/White.

I have found the wire to be a more steady dog, perhaps more solid in behaviour and also very standoffish with strangers and easily bonded to one person.

That's not to say my wires aren't nuts - they are... just don't seem to be quite as highly strung as the GSP.

And before anyone asks - yes I have many friends with GSP's (I like the breed) including one of the top breeders in NSW (who's place I stay at when I am over in Sydney) but my wires just seem a bit more laid-back.

Rae

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rugerfly   

Hi Rae! not seen you in ages here. :mad

I rekon you would be right about one thing. A GSP breeders dogs, especially in numerous amounts would be a little highly strung. Go to any pet persons house though, that has the time and gives the attention to one or two dogs, it makes a difference. GSP's just dont make good kennel dogs. Knowing you, all your wires are allowed to sleep on your bed :mad

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Hotwyr   

hey ya,

yep been busy......blurry dogs LOL.....

agree one or two dogs are always going to be more sedate that 10 or 20 ROFL

LOL RF, two sleep on the bed in the house.......that's enuff....

Hoping Troy does a GWP 101 soon..........

Was at a show on the weekend and got shortlisted for top 5 in group - Judge asked me to bring out the

German Shorthaired Wirehair.............. Like WTF!!!!!! :mad

Edited by Hotwyr

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Based on boarding kennel experience, "restrained" in the breed standard, is inaccurate (should read: "best if restrained"). I also don't understand what "noble" means. If GSPs represent nobility, good thing we're not a monarchy. I would not like to have beasts with this temperament in control.

Most GSPs are dogs you would not want to greet in the morning before you've had your dose of java. Many pet GSPs don't seem to have had the early discipline recommended by many people on this thread; and many don't take 'no' as an answer. By in large, they are graceful, affectionate dogs; they eat huge quantities of food and stay lean; they mix well with other dogs and do a good job of making sure the whole pack gets tired; and they are less prone to digging holes than many gun dogs. Great dogs, but high energy and demanding of interaction.

Edited by sandgrubber

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Based on boarding kennel experience, "restrained" in the breed standard, is inaccurate (should read: "best if restrained"). I also don't understand what "noble" means. If GSPs represent nobility, good thing we're not a monarchy. I would not like to have beasts with this temperament in control.

Most GSPs are dogs you would not want to greet in the morning before you've had your dose of java. Many pet GSPs don't seem to have had the early discipline recommended by many people on this thread; and many don't take 'no' as an answer. By in large, they are graceful, affectionate dogs; they eat huge quantities of food and stay lean; they mix well with other dogs and do a good job of making sure the whole pack gets tired; and they are less prone to digging holes than many gun dogs. Great dogs, but high energy and demanding of interaction.

I have to disagree, they are an incredibly noble dog and incredibly smart.

Youll have to come to my house and watch my lounge lizards when lifting your head is too much effort :rofl: . We have three and yes they play hard at play time, but come sleep time they also sleep hard - Sienna wont get out of bed before nine (will also add she is happy to stay there alone too)- no she isnt old, just not a morning girl. :D

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Anna H   
Based on boarding kennel experience, "restrained" in the breed standard, is inaccurate (should read: "best if restrained"). I also don't understand what "noble" means. If GSPs represent nobility, good thing we're not a monarchy. I would not like to have beasts with this temperament in control.

Most GSPs are dogs you would not want to greet in the morning before you've had your dose of java. Many pet GSPs don't seem to have had the early discipline recommended by many people on this thread; and many don't take 'no' as an answer. By in large, they are graceful, affectionate dogs; they eat huge quantities of food and stay lean; they mix well with other dogs and do a good job of making sure the whole pack gets tired; and they are less prone to digging holes than many gun dogs. Great dogs, but high energy and demanding of interaction.

:laugh: ahhhhh... but poor Sandgrubber is looking after my two naughty ratbags at the moment!!! the words 'noble' and 'restrained' really don't apply to either of them :) :p

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Anna H   
Based on boarding kennel experience, "restrained" in the breed standard, is inaccurate (should read: "best if restrained"). I also don't understand what "noble" means. If GSPs represent nobility, good thing we're not a monarchy. I would not like to have beasts with this temperament in control.

Most GSPs are dogs you would not want to greet in the morning before you've had your dose of java. Many pet GSPs don't seem to have had the early discipline recommended by many people on this thread; and many don't take 'no' as an answer. By in large, they are graceful, affectionate dogs; they eat huge quantities of food and stay lean; they mix well with other dogs and do a good job of making sure the whole pack gets tired; and they are less prone to digging holes than many gun dogs. Great dogs, but high energy and demanding of interaction.

:laugh: ahhhhh... but poor Sandgrubber is looking after my two naughty ratbags at the moment!!! the words 'noble' and 'restrained' really don't apply to either of them :) :p

Sleep in till 9am??? Wow, mine both wake at 5am raring to go.

Edited by AnnaW

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Zenith   

ANSWERS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Got my first GSP as a child 20 years ago, and my second GSP that I've had from a pup is rising 12 years

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

I think this has been answered well by other posters :p

3. How common is it in Australia?

I think this has been answered well by other posters :laugh:

4. What is the average lifespan?

I hope forever!

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

In addition to what other posters have said. Both my GSP's have been extremely loyal, loving, affectionate, and joyous dogs! My first was a female, and she was a little stronger in personality than my current GSP, who is a little more sooky and softer. From my GSP's and my friends GSP's they seem to have the ability to be a complete goof, and at other times be completely noble and almost regal. They do seem to be eternal puppies, although after around 6-7years they do slow down a lot. I don't find them overly energetic, as others have described they are more enthusiastic and willing to partake in whatever activity their 'person' or 'people' are doing. Mine have always been happy to be outside running on the farm, or laying at my feet inside, they just prefer to be involved.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Mine have free exercise for a minimum of 3 hours a day on the farm, this includes swimming, running, and sometimes chasing rabbits.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I think depending on the owners willingness to learn, and to train their puppy. Its not a breed I would automatically recommend to first time owners, it would depend on their circumstances. I have found them very very easy to train, but they can be cheeky and destructive despite best intentions especially in their adolescent years.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Teddy my current GSP has been on his own when his companions have passed away. He is happy as long as he has people around. As a young dog he was best confined to his run during the day when we were at school/work so he did not become destructive, however as he aged he was fine by himself on the property not confined to his run. He was free exercised for at least 3 hours a day, plus show and obedience training.

9. How much grooming is required?

Very little - a quick brush every now and again, and we wipe over with a towel if its wet outside or dewy or if swimming.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

We have always been careful with small children and infirm people with any of our larger dogs. I don't think they always realise their size and weight, however caution and a watchful eye is always recommended with any dog. We found by placing the dogs on a lead around young people or infirm (or those scared of big dogs) works a treat. My GSP's have always had super manners on the lead, and are more than happy to sit and have a cuddle.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

I think this one has been well covered :)

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

I think this has also been well covered.

I don't think I could be without a GSP - everyone who meets my Teddy are usually scared at first (he has a big bark when people arrive on the property) but within minutes they are usually having GSP cuddles and kisses :rofl: They are addictive and they have a special place in my heart!

Some piccies of Ted

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I have to disagree, they are an incredibly noble dog and incredibly smart.

Youll have to come to my house and watch my lounge lizards when lifting your head is too much effort :thumbsup: . We have three and yes they play hard at play time, but come sleep time they also sleep hard - Sienna wont get out of bed before nine (will also add she is happy to stay there alone too)- no she isnt old, just not a morning girl. :thumbsup:

Please tell, how do you determine what is 'noble'. I see little resemblance between any GSP I've ever seen and Queen Elizabeth -- or most of her relatives. I don't think the [uK] Queen would appreciate nobility being identified with lounge lizard characteristics. She seems much more focussed on duty and honour and the stiff upper lip.

Note, I'm responding as someone with a science background is annoyed by breed standards that include subjective words [like noble] and open ended terms [like broad, narrow, deep]. Subjective words leave too much to the judge's interpretation. Open ended terms result in directed selection for ever more extreme characteristics . . .which has to be unbalanced and probably unhealthy.

Edited by sandgrubber

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