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German Shorthaired Pointer

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Hi,

This is my first post on here although I have been 'browsing' for a while!! We are a family of five, 2 girls age 11, 15 and a male staffyX rescue dog age 6.

We are looking to buy a female puppy and have narrowed our breed 'preference' down to 2 breeds, one of which is a GSP. My main question is do you think its feasable to have a gsp as a family pet with on average a half hour walk a day? I've read lots of posts about very active families and therefore active dogs and am beginning to worry that it would not be fair to the dog if we weren't giving it the exercise it really needs. Our dog at the minute is a very young dog and likes nothing better than having a good run on the beach like a mad thing but on the other hand is also happy to sunbake all day

Any advice would be greatly appreciated :laugh:

Thanks

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CareyJ   
Hi,

This is my first post on here although I have been 'browsing' for a while!! We are a family of five, 2 girls age 11, 15 and a male staffyX rescue dog age 6.

We are looking to buy a female puppy and have narrowed our breed 'preference' down to 2 breeds, one of which is a GSP. My main question is do you think its feasable to have a gsp as a family pet with on average a half hour walk a day? I've read lots of posts about very active families and therefore active dogs and am beginning to worry that it would not be fair to the dog if we weren't giving it the exercise it really needs. Our dog at the minute is a very young dog and likes nothing better than having a good run on the beach like a mad thing but on the other hand is also happy to sunbake all day

Any advice would be greatly appreciated :laugh:

Thanks

Hi Daydreamer, Try the German Shorthaired Pointer breed subforum with this too - If I knew how to cross post or attach a link for you I would...but I dont. Sorry :rofl:

Leila is our first GSP and is still only 7 months old. She is walked twice per day during the week - before and after work but on the weekends if we are home it might only be once. Leila spends most of her day sunbaking too! She is is a run so needs to get out and stretch her legs.

I guess it depends on how big your back yard is too and if there is plenty of stimulation. We find that if we drop Leila off at a friends place to play all day with their dog, she is asleep as soon as she gets in the car! Also if she is in a bigger backyard she tends to go, go go and then crash at the end of the day. Personality must play a huge part too I reckon, Leila is so independent.

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Please tell, how do you determine what is 'noble'. I see little resemblance between any GSP I've ever seen and Queen Elizabeth -- or most of her relatives. I don't think the [uK] Queen would appreciate nobility being identified with lounge lizard characteristics. She seems much more focussed on duty and honour and the stiff upper lip.

Note, I'm responding as someone with a science background is annoyed by breed standards that include subjective words [like noble] and open ended terms [like broad, narrow, deep]. Subjective words leave too much to the judge's interpretation. Open ended terms result in directed selection for ever more extreme characteristics . . .which has to be unbalanced and probably unhealthy.

From the dictionary

Noble: a very impressive or imposing in appearance; stately; magnificent: a noble monument.

Certainly fits.

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VJB   
Sleep in till 9am??? Wow, mine both wake at 5am raring to go.

Heidi doesn't move till we move or the kids get up.....and on weekends it is well after 8am. Depends on the dog though and the routine of the household I guess.

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Hi,

This is my first post on here although I have been 'browsing' for a while!! We are a family of five, 2 girls age 11, 15 and a male staffyX rescue dog age 6.

We are looking to buy a female puppy and have narrowed our breed 'preference' down to 2 breeds, one of which is a GSP. My main question is do you think its feasable to have a gsp as a family pet with on average a half hour walk a day? I've read lots of posts about very active families and therefore active dogs and am beginning to worry that it would not be fair to the dog if we weren't giving it the exercise it really needs. Our dog at the minute is a very young dog and likes nothing better than having a good run on the beach like a mad thing but on the other hand is also happy to sunbake all day

Any advice would be greatly appreciated :laugh:

Thanks

Hi Daydreamer, Try the German Shorthaired Pointer breed subforum with this too - If I knew how to cross post or attach a link for you I would...but I dont. Sorry :rofl:

Leila is our first GSP and is still only 7 months old. She is walked twice per day during the week - before and after work but on the weekends if we are home it might only be once. Leila spends most of her day sunbaking too! She is is a run so needs to get out and stretch her legs.

I guess it depends on how big your back yard is too and if there is plenty of stimulation. We find that if we drop Leila off at a friends place to play all day with their dog, she is asleep as soon as she gets in the car! Also if she is in a bigger backyard she tends to go, go go and then crash at the end of the day. Personality must play a huge part too I reckon, Leila is so independent.

Thanks for your reply Carey, its such a big decision and I just want it to be right for the new puppy as well as for the family :rofl: . We are also in Perth so may be asking for your advice in the future too about breeders etc! - I'll go and check out the GSP subforum too xx

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Anna H   
Thanks for your reply Carey, its such a big decision and I just want it to be right for the new puppy as well as for the family :thumbsup: . We are also in Perth so may be asking for your advice in the future too about breeders etc! - I'll go and check out the GSP subforum too xx

Daydreamer, don't rule out eastern states breeders either (whatever breed you decide on) - flying a pup over here is not expensive.

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Daydreamer, don't rule out eastern states breeders either (whatever breed you decide on) - flying a pup over here is not expensive.

We had thought of that but isn't it better to see the pup before you buy? I also worry about scams where you pay your money and no pup arrives :thumbsup: .

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FionaC   

Just let us know on the GSP thread where you're looking and someone can give you some advice ......

Yes it is ideal to see the pup before you buy but if you're going with a reputable, ethical, registered breeder then it should be fine - depending on which breeder you go with they may be selecting the pup for you rather than you having the choice - but you can also do that via photos etc ... and if they are breeders who show their dogs as well then someone from the thread will know their other dogs and be able to help there too ....

Edited by FionaC

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gspx3   

Sandgrubber, as DA stated, noble refers to their carriage and the fact that they hold their heads high all the time giving them a really 'noble' look. They step out with beautiful gait and with that head high they can only be described as noble in look. This is not a breed which 'slinks' along. If you have a problem with these words then you had best get on to the ANKC and have them change the wording of breed standards. They all have some strange ones in them but everyone seems to know just what is meant by them.

I still have to disagree about the colour black being a source of aggression. It is not possible for the colour to project aggression in any dog it is mainly in the nurturing of said dog. Very occasionally, there will be a dog with an aggressive nature but that is so rare as to almost not be possible to register.

Now I'll slip back to my pleasant little hidey hole with my liver and white and very, very socialised black and white.

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Guest rhapsodical78   
Guest rhapsodical78

I asked this in the English Pointer thread, but am too impatient for a response to wait - so I'll ask here. What are the main differences in temperament between the English Pointer and the GSP?

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Anna H   
We had thought of that but isn't it better to see the pup before you buy? I also worry about scams where you pay your money and no pup arrives

Go through a reputable breeder with plenty of experience in the breed, be honest about your situation and requirements, and you shouldn't have any problems. I trusted Olivers' breeder (Eastern States) to select the right pup for our situation and am very very happy with the boy I received and love him to bits. In all honesty, whilst price wasnt' a big factor in purchasing a pup - it would've been cheaper for me to fly over east, select and purchase a pup and bring it back than the cost of purchasing a pup over here at the time.

I don't really know the difference personality wise between an English Pointer and a GSP - the English Pointers I've met have been far more reserved and seem to 'grow up faster' than the GSP's :champagne: Someone who really knows the difference will be along soon I'm sure....

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hey guys

Just a observation question.

I haven't met alot of GSP before but every one I have met has some sort of aggression towards other dogs, not people tho. Sometimes its just a growl and other times its a full on snapping, biting, growling confrontation. Is this a common thing with this breed? or have I just been unlucky to see all the naughty ones.

thanks

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FHRP   

Aggression is not common nor acceptable in the breed. Unfortunately there are individuals in the breed with undesireable temperaments, as in any breed.

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FionaC   
hey guys

Just a observation question.

I haven't met alot of GSP before but every one I have met has some sort of aggression towards other dogs, not people tho. Sometimes its just a growl and other times its a full on snapping, biting, growling confrontation. Is this a common thing with this breed? or have I just been unlucky to see all the naughty ones.

thanks

good grief - ummm not common at all (one would hope)

my boy loves everyone and every dog - he gets upset when another dog doesn't like him .....

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kathq   
hey guys

Just a observation question.

I haven't met alot of GSP before but every one I have met has some sort of aggression towards other dogs, not people tho. Sometimes its just a growl and other times its a full on snapping, biting, growling confrontation. Is this a common thing with this breed? or have I just been unlucky to see all the naughty ones.

thanks

Not common at all thank goodness though any breed is capable of aggression in the right or is it that wrong circumstances. Both my girls love everybody with four or two legs.

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VJB   

Agree with everyone on the fact that it can happen in any breed, but for me, the non aggressive tendency was one of the reasons we chose to get a GSP. I've not met an aggressive one as yet, and my girl certainly isn't.

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Fourjays   

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Breeder, exhibitor, trainer, trialler, having owned the breed now for 12 years, been showing and trialling for 11 years.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Already covered previously

3. How common is it in Australia?

Not overly common but with more media exposure in recent years, the breed has gotten more popular as a pet. Has always been popular as a rough shooting dog and for field work.

4. What is the average lifespan?

12-15 years though I have met 1 that was 18 years old and several that were 16, sadly have also known a few lost young as well.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Exuberant! This is an outgoing, energetic, dynamic breed that is not for everyone. They should be capable of running around in the field all day and then also coming home and switching off and settling down in the home with you. They do not have a 'golden retriever' temperament however, whilst they should be friendly with people and other dogs, it is not expected that they are immediate friends with all that they meet, they can be slightly reserved towards strangers and do have a protective streak as well (not aggressive!) - something the Germans wanted in a dog that was meant to be a hunters best friend. They should tolerate other dogs well as this is a breed developed to work in the field with others of their own kind or different breeds. My own experience and observations have been that males in particular will bicker with other males especially when females of the species are around! Typically, they start to mentally mature at around 3 years of age and then again.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Minimum of an hours exercise everyday, ideally off lead, as well as some training too (I recommend a minimum of the first 12 months of obedience classes - a strong recall is a must!). This breed is extremely exuberant & energetic in their teenage years (up to 3 years of age, some a bit longer) and need lots of activity and daily mental stimulation to counter act this. They are a very fun breed to have around if you yourself are an outdoor, active type of person or family. This is a breed that is meant to work in the field up until they are 10 years of age, if not longer, so they are going to be active for most of their life, they are essentially a working breed, not a suburban backyard couch potato :)

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I don't recommend them for this, no, as I have seen the results of GSPs going to first time dog owners with no clue. Of course, all situations vary and if the owner was someone who'd done a lot of research and was prepared to listen and learn from their breeder, then this would be different.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

No, this breed can and does suffer from seperation anxiety. They are a dog that needs companionship. Definately not a dog you can leave in your backyard on its own for long periods of time (or like some I've come across - all the time!). They MUST be with you, or another doggy friend - or else they will become destructive, unruly, noisy or start escaping - they are well known for their climbing feats.

9. How much grooming is required?

Minimal - once a week run over with a hound glove/curry comb, toenails fortnightly, ears cleaned & checked monthly - though more regularly if the dog is swimming frequently. Teeth should be taken care of either with regular bones, a dental diet, or manual cleaning.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

If not trained, then yes. All dogs around children should be supervised anyway. Not a breed I recommend for the infirm at all they are too strong and boisterous and don't suit a slower pace of life. I don't recommend this breed being left untrained at all, they must have obedience training!

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

There's not a lot that is necessarily 'common' but like with all animals/dogs, there are some problems out there.

Eye problems do exist, ranging from entropian to loose eyelids

Skin allergies exist, particularly in some lines

There is some incidence of hip dysplasia and OCD (though OCD isn't necessarily an inherited condition either)

I have been made aware of quite a few incidences of epilepsy of late as well

Temperament issues do exist as well, ranging from shyness, fearfullness through to aggression, more commonly towards other dogs, but I have seen it towards people as well - this is not necessarily an inherited issue however, temperament can, and is more often, affected by environment and early socialisation.

Other minor issues: umbilical hernias, bite/dentition issues, ear infections

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

The main thing I would be asking is first of all, what activities do they do with their GSP to prove their worth to the breed? Why are they breeding this particular litter - all breeders worth their salt should have a plan and direction of where they are heading with each and every breeding that they do.

Do they health test? And if so, what?

The breed average for hips is around 8 or 9. Hip scores should be as low and as even as possible eg 0:0 or 2:2. Elbows shoud be 0:0. Be aware though that some imported lines the scores have been higher (have seen this in UK lines, the average there seems to be higher than we have here)

Ask about health issues/temperament/credentials/titles of the parents. View as many of the relatives of the litter as possible - go and view the breeders premises if possible to see how clean it is, how their dogs are looked after etc.

ASK FOR REFERENCES!! Again, a good breeder will have people happy to be references for them and let you know, or let you meet, puppies they have bought from that particular breeder.

Go to shows/trials/events to see as many of the breed as you can and talk to as many people as you can. Don't believe everything that you are told (especially by some breeders, they don't all tell the truth), try to talk to owners as well and get a balanced view of the breed and of the lines that are available out there.

Also ask about the longevity of their lines too.

And ask about what support you get when buying one of their puppies. Some will just take your money, you want someone who is there for the life of your dog, to answer any questions you may have and to follow your journey through life together :)

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Pointees   

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

First time owner/rescuer

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Already covered previously

3. How common is it in Australia?

Honestly, more common then the Pointer, although not in my house. :)

4. What is the average lifespan?

12-15 years

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

This has been covered above, and I can't really compare as I have had my boy 2 days and he was neglected to a point in his last home.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

My boy runs aorund with my two pointers during the day, and they all have a daily walk that last an hour or so.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I wouldn't recommend them to a first time owner, but then, not everyday is the same.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

I would recommend a friend for them.

9. How much grooming is required?

Quick brush over weekly to remove dead hairs.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

If not trained, then yes. All dogs around children should be supervised anyway. Not a breed I recommend for the infirm at all they are too strong and boisterous and don't suit a slower pace of life. I don't recommend this breed being left untrained at all, they must have obedience training!

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

There's not a lot that is necessarily 'common' but like with all animals/dogs, there are some problems out there.

Eye problems do exist, ranging from entropian to loose eyelids

Skin allergies exist, particularly in some lines

There is some incidence of hip dysplasia and OCD (though OCD isn't necessarily an inherited condition either)

I have been made aware of quite a few incidences of epilepsy of late as well

Temperament issues do exist as well, ranging from shyness, fearfullness through to aggression, more commonly towards other dogs, but I have seen it towards people as well - this is not necessarily an inherited issue however, temperament can, and is more often, affected by environment and early socialisation.

Other minor issues: umbilical hernias, bite/dentition issues, ear infections

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

The main thing I would be asking is first of all, what activities do they do with their GSP to prove their worth to the breed? Why are they breeding this particular litter - all breeders worth their salt should have a plan and direction of where they are heading with each and every breeding that they do.

Do they health test? And if so, what?

The breed average for hips is around 8 or 9. Hip scores should be as low and as even as possible eg 0:0 or 2:2. Elbows shoud be 0:0. Be aware though that some imported lines the scores have been higher (have seen this in UK lines, the average there seems to be higher than we have here)

Ask about health issues/temperament/credentials/titles of the parents. View as many of the relatives of the litter as possible - go and view the breeders premises if possible to see how clean it is, how their dogs are looked after etc.

ASK FOR REFERENCES!! Again, a good breeder will have people happy to be references for them and let you know, or let you meet, puppies they have bought from that particular breeder.

Go to shows/trials/events to see as many of the breed as you can and talk to as many people as you can. Don't believe everything that you are told (especially by some breeders, they don't all tell the truth), try to talk to owners as well and get a balanced view of the breed and of the lines that are available out there.

Edited by Pointees

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luvmypet   

We have bought our first GSP. We purchased him 4 weeks ago from the pound. I had no intentions of buying him at first and thought someone would for sure adopt him but a week later and looking very stressed and rather thin he was still there so I adopted him. I thought we would look after him until we could find him a home but my husband has fallen in LOVE with him. He is 2 years desexed, super affectionate and super exuberant at times. My questions....I have a few... He gets about an hour jog every morning and we would love to be able to take him to the dog park and let him off lead so he could run but we've tried it twice now and he runs away or should I say bolts away (silly I know but he sits, drops, stays and walks well most of the time so thought it was worth a shot). He is also not that good at retrieving a ball - he has done it a few times - but not anything enough to run off some steam. I guess I feel I need him to be able to do the above so I can exercise him without exercising myself, Is it to late to expect him to learn this? He is easily distracted will he settle with time and training? Is there any methods that seem to work best with this breed? any suggestions...

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Luvmypet firstly good on for rescuing this boy! GSP's are excitable and at two your boy is just a baby still. He is very close in age to my youngest girl! GSP's need to be stimulated mentally as well, so a half hour of training will help to tire your boy out. Four weeks is not a lot of time for him to understand what you want and if he has been couped up in the pound then i can imagine he would take every opportunity to run (and boy do GSP's love to run).

I wouldn’t be letting him offlead until you are well and truly sure that you have a reliable recall, which it certainly isnt too late for him to learn. I would start by taking him back to basics and doing recall in your yard - then building up to recall on a long lead and then on a long lead in the park - that way you can always real him in if you need to.

Oh Photos are essential to by the way :laugh::laugh:

Please come and join us in the German Shorthaired Pointer Thread in Breed Sub Forums :laugh:

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