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Dachshund

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Troy   

The Dachshund / Miniature Dachshund

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=229 )

Group: Group 4 (Hounds)

History: Originating in Germany, the Dachshund, (Teckel) was bred to hunt small game, predominantly badger, that goes to ground. The dog was required to scent, track and pursue game into burrows. The dog was required to move over all types of terrain, including dense undergrowth and water. The Dachshund was required to have intelligence, strength, endurance and versatility, a long body with relatively short legs and three different coat types all of which combine to enable it fulfil its purpose.

Miniature Dachshunds were bred to have the same attributes as Standards, but were used to hunt smaller game.

General Appearance: Moderately long and low with no exaggeration, compact, well-muscled body, with enough ground clearance to allow free movement. Heights at the withers should be half the length of the body, measured from breastbone to the rear of thigh. Bold, defiant carriage of the head and intelligent expression.

Characteristics: Intelligent, lively, courageous to the point of rashness, obedient. Especially suited to going to ground because of low build, very strong forequarters and forelegs. Long, strong jaw, and immense power of bite and hold. Excellent nose, persevering hunter and tracker. Essential that functional build is retained to ensure working ability.

Temperament: Faithful, versatile and good tempered.

Head And Skull: Long, appearing conical when seen from above; from side tapering uniformly to tip of nose. Skull only slightly arched. Neither too broad nor too narrow, sloping gradually without prominent stop into slightly arched muzzle. Length from tip of nose to eyes equal to length from eyes to occiput. In wire haired, particularly, ridges over eyes strongly prominent, giving appearance of slightly broader skull. Lips well stretched, neatly covering lower jaw. Strong jaw bones not too square or snipy, but opening wide.

Eyes: Medium size, almond shaped, set obliquely. Dark except in chocolates, where they can be lighter. In dapples one or both wall eyes permissible.

Ears: Set high, and not too far forward. Broad, of moderate length, and well rounded (not pointed or folded). Forward edge touching cheek. Mobile, and when at attention back of ear directed forward and outward.

Mouth: Teeth strongly developed, powerful canine teeth fitting closely. Jaws strong, with a perfect, regular and complete scissor bite, i.e. upper teeth closely overlapping lower teeth and set square to the jaws. Complete dentition important.

Neck: Long, muscular, clean with no dewlap, slightly arched, running in graceful lines into shoulders, carried proudly forward.

Forequarters: Shoulder blades long, broad, and placed firmly and obliquely (45 degrees to the horizontal) upon very robust rib cage. Upper arm the same length as shoulder blade, set at 90 degrees to it, very strong, and covered with hard, supple muscles. Upper arm lies close to ribs, but able to move freely. Forearm short and strong in bone, inclining slightly inwards; when seen in profile moderately straight, must not bend forward or knuckle over, which indicates unsoundness. Correctly placed foreleg should cover the lowest point of the keel.

Body: Moderately long and full muscled. Sloping shoulders, back reasonably level, blending harmoniously between withers and slightly arched loin. Loin short and strong. Breast bone strong, and so prominent that a depression appears on either side of it in front. When viewed from front, thorax full and oval; when viewed from side or above, full volumed, so allowing by its ample capacity complete development of heart and lungs. Well ribbed up, underline gradually merging into line of abdomen. Body sufficiently clear of ground to allow free movement.

Hindquarters: Rump full, broad and strong, pliant muscles. Croup long, full, robustly muscled, only slightly sloping towards tail. Pelvis strong, set obliquely and not too short. Upper thigh set at right angles to pelvis, strong and of good length. Lower thigh short, set at right angles to upper thigh and well muscled. Legs when seen behind set well apart, straight and parallel.

Feet: Front feet full, broad, deep, close knit, straight or very slightly turned out. Hindfeet smaller and narrower. Toes close together, with a decided arch to each toe, strong regularly placed nails, thick and firm pads. Dog must stand true, i.e. equally on all parts of the foot.

Tail: Continues line of spine, but slightly curved, without kinks or twists, not carried too high, or touching ground when at rest.

Gait/Movement: Should be free and flowing. Stride should be long, with the drive coming from hindquarters when viewed from the side. Viewed from in front or behind, the legs and feet should move parallel to each other with the distance apart being the width of the shoulder and hip joints respectively.

Coat: Smooth-Haired

Dense, short and smooth. Hair on underside of tail coarse in texture. Skin loose and supple, but fitting closely all over without dewlap and little or no wrinkle.

Long-Haired

Soft and straight, or only slightly waved; longest under neck, on underparts of body and behind legs, where it forms abundant feathering, on tail where it forms a flag. Outside of ears well feathered. Coat flat, and not obscuring outline. Too much hair on feet undesirable.

Wire-Haired

With exception of jaw, eyebrows, chin and ears, the whole body should be covered with a short, straight, harsh coat with dense undercoat, beard on chin, eyebrows bushy, but hair on ears almost smooth. Legs and feet well but neatly furnished with harsh coat.

Colour: All colours permitted but no white permissible, save for a small patch on chest which is permitted but not desirable. The dapple pattern is expressed as lighter coloured areas contrasting with the darker base. Neither the light nor the dark colour should predominate. Double dapple (where varying amounts of white occurs all over the body in addition to the dapple pattern) is unacceptable. Nose and nails black in all colours except chocolate/tan and chocolate/dapple where they are brown.

Sizes: Ideal weight 9-12 kgs (20-26 lbs)

Miniature ideal weight 4.5kgs (10 lbs). Desired maximum weight 5kgs (11 lbs)

Exhibits which appear thin and undernourished should be severely penalised.

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points, including desired body condition should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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Rozzie   

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Own a Mini smooth.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Germany for hunting

4. What is the average lifespan?

15 or 16. Mine will be 20 next year.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Mine is very affable. She is happy to snuggle with the cat. She is not snappy or yappy (preconceived idea of a lot of non Dachsy people.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

She wanders around the houseyard these days but used to enjoy a daily walk and activity.

9. How much grooming is required?

Minimal on a smooth

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Can only speak from owner perspective, but ours loves cuddling with anyone. (Bit of a tart!)

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Rozzie   

Not where food is concerned with Abbey! though it has only been basic obedience.

I'd have another Dachshund in a heartbeat.

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KKDD   

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Iv owned them since childhood. Currently have 3 mini smooths - 2 males and a female.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Germany - they do lots of lovely flop-eared dogs in Germany dont they?

3. How common is it in Australia?

Fairly common.

4. What is the average lifespan?

You would be very disappointed if they didnt get past 15 years.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

They are loyal and affectionate, but having had quite a few (and I rescue them too) Im afraid Id have to describe them as frequently yappy and snappy too. The breed has been rated on some surveys as the breed most likely to bite - and I would not argue with that, despite them being my favourite breed. Mine are all delightful, but also yappy and snappy. They need a certain type of owner who is alert to their potential for aggression, especially around strange dogs and kids. They have a high prey drive and are territorial. Great watch dogs. Also very very cuddly and loyal to their special person. And they are a great size and shape for teddy-bear duties (their little legs dont get in the way).

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

A short walk is enough - they definitely need to keep fit and trim.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Wouldnt be my first choice for a first time owner, particularly if there were children involved.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

They can, but would need to get used to it.

9. How much grooming is required?

Hardly any for the smooths.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

More that children might be too boisterous for the breed. They need consistent careful handling to prevent cumulative damage to the spine. They are not generally a boisterous breed. A good breed for elderly people.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Dodgy spines. Ruptured disks that can result in a paralysed dog. A relatively common problem in this breed. Expensive and difficult to fix. Leads to a lot of dachshunds being put down prematurely.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Best to check the spinal history in the breeders dogs. And check out the older dogs too as the spines can go just about any age.

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TeamSnag   

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Owner of 3 mini longs (exhibit)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Dachshund is German and translated means Badger Dog.

They were bred short and long to go into burrows after badgers and other burrowing creatures to flush them out.

3. How common is it in Australia?

I find smooths are more common then the long/wire

4. What is the average lifespan?

15/16

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Faithful, versatile and good tempered.

Good with kids, i take mine to my daughters day care at times.. and strangers they would lick you to death.. its like any dog.. they need socialisation they just love ppl

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

I wouldnt say to much.. mine love to have a run outside and chase a ball

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Yes.. they are great lil dogs!

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Yes but why just stop at one? LoL

9. How much grooming is required?

smooths no.. Longs well a brush here and there.. wires.. i heard they can do alot of work and alot of hand stripping

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

No my daughter is 4 and just loves them.. i had them when she was a baby too.. they just love kids

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

PRA in longs is the biggest

Back probs.. well if u keep the dog at a healthy weight u shouldnt have a prob...alot of back probs in dachies are owners fault

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

PRA for longs...

Backs, iv never had any probs with my dogs

Edited by TeamSnag

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The breeder of my Fauves as standard smooths and they are snappy and yappy. Is this common?

In my experience I have found (in the show ring) that most of the wires & longs have great personalities but the smooths can be a little touchier. Would this be an accurate assessment?

Also I've noticed at shows that they are shockers for barking and carrying on if anyone walks past their crate or pen so I've assumed that they're quite a guarding breed?

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TeamSnag   
The breeder of my Fauves as standard smooths and they are snappy and yappy. Is this common?

In my experience I have found (in the show ring) that most of the wires & longs have great personalities but the smooths can be a little touchier. Would this be an accurate assessment?

Also I've noticed at shows that they are shockers for barking and carrying on if anyone walks past their crate or pen so I've assumed that they're quite a guarding breed?

I only own longs and they seemed to be more layed back then the others..

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KKDD   
The breeder of my Fauves as standard smooths and they are snappy and yappy. Is this common?

In my experience I have found (in the show ring) that most of the wires & longs have great personalities but the smooths can be a little touchier. Would this be an accurate assessment?

Also I've noticed at shows that they are shockers for barking and carrying on if anyone walks past their crate or pen so I've assumed that they're quite a guarding breed?

I think on average this is a fair assessment of many smooths. Beautiful dogs with people they know, however.

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Most definitely - his dogs turn into piles of butter around him :laugh: as does my own :rofl:

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Do the mini Dashies have a high prey drive being a hunting breed? I was also wondering about how the long haired ones go in a farm enviroment with thins like burs and stuff?

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Jodi1981   

******Stupid Question Alert******

How is Dashshund pronounced :) I recently watched an american show and they way they pronounced it was different to they way I've always though of it, never actaully seeing any IRL etc. :laugh:

Jodi

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TeamSnag   
Do the mini Dashies have a high prey drive being a hunting breed? I was also wondering about how the long haired ones go in a farm enviroment with thins like burs and stuff?

Not good at all with burs.. as for high prey drive.. mine will chase a bird ans stuff but have never killed other animal

******Stupid Question Alert******

How is Dashshund pronounced :o I recently watched an american show and they way they pronounced it was different to they way I've always though of it, never actaully seeing any IRL etc. :o

Jodi

Alot of ppl say dash hound... its not spelt like that to start with.. its Dachshund and its pronounced DaxHund..

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Leithy   

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I own two- a long haired standard and a dapple mini/standard.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

In german, to hunt down tunnels and badgers.

3. How common is it in Australia?

Seems to be more common in other states than South Australia.

4. What is the average lifespan?

14-16 years.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Stereotypically, long haired doxies are laid back, short haired are very in your face, and wire haired are the comedians. However I think how you raise them has a big part to do with it, but my dogs fall exactly into those cateogies lol so i'm probably wrong.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

I take my two girls out for an hour about four times a week.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Depends on how stubborn that owner is, my two girls can be very stubborn sometimes.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

I found that my first dog couldnt, so that's one of the reasons I got a second pup. Much better with two.

9. How much grooming is required?

Short haired very little. Long haired, I brush her three times a week. I wash them both once a fortnight.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

No, I think that kids would need to be carefully especially due to spinal problems with the breed.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Spinals issues.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Vaccinations, temperment, see the parents and see what kind of conditions they were raised in.

:laugh:

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MrRedDog   

Did you know the first ever Olympic mascot was a Dachshund known as Waldi, at the 1972 Summer Olympic games in Munich! :p

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Gretel   
Did you know the first ever Olympic mascot was a Dachshund known as Waldi, at the 1972 Summer Olympic games in Munich! :p

No I didn't! Isn't that lovely :p

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Ons   

would they be a good show dog for an experienced owner but a first time showie?

How are they around big dogs?

thank you :-)

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TeamSnag   

I starting showing 4 years ago and thats what i started with... Parents had them when i was a kid and it went from there... (and still own them)

Mine used to play with my aunties basset before he pass over.

Edited by TeamSnag

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