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French Bulldog

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Troy   

The French Bulldog

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=189 )

Group: Group 7 (Non Sporting)

General Appearance: Sturdy, compact, solid, small dog with good bone, short, smooth coat. No point exaggerated, balance essential. Dogs showing respiratory distress highly undesirable.

Characteristics: Full of courage, yet with clown-like qualities. Bat ears and short tail characteristic features of the breed.

Temperament: Vivacious, deeply affectionate, intelligent.

Head And Skull: Head square in appearance and in proportion to dog�s size. Skull nearly flat between ears, domed forehead. The skin covering the skull and forehead should be supple enough to allow the dog to show facial expression. Well defined muzzle, broad, deep and set back, muscles of cheeks well developed. Stop well defined. Lower jaw deep, square, broad, slightly undershot and turned up. Nose black and wide, relatively short, with open nostrils and line between well defined. Lips black, thick, meeting each other in centre, completely hiding teeth. Upper lip covers lower on each side with plenty of cushion, never so exaggerated as to hang too much below level of lower jaw.

Eyes: Preferably dark and matching. Moderate size, round, neither sunken or prominent, showing no white when looking straight forward; set relatively wide apart and on the same level as the stop.

Ears: �Bat ears�, of medium size, wide at base, rounded at top; set high, carried upright and parallel, a sufficient width of skull preventing them being too close together; skin soft and fine, orifice as seen from the front, showing entirely. The opening to the ear canal should be wide and open.

Mouth: Slightly undershot. Teeth sound and regular, but not visible when the mouth is closed. Tongue must not protrude.

Neck: Powerful, well-arched and thick, but not too short.

Forequarters: Legs set wide apart, straight boned, strong, muscular and short.

Body: Cobby, muscular and well rounded with deep, wide brisket and ribs well sprung. Strong, gently roached back. Good cut up. The body while broader at the shoulders should narrow slightly beyond the ribs to give definition to the relatively short, thick, strong, muscular loin.

Hindquarters: Legs strong, muscular and relatively longer than forelegs, with moderate angulation. Hocks well let down.

Feet: Small, compact and placed in continuation of line of leg, with absolutely sound pasterns. Hind feet rather longer than the fore-feet. Toes compact; well knuckled; nails short, thick and preferably black.

Tail: Undocked, short, set low. Thick at root, tapering quickly towards tip, preferably straight and long enough to cover anus. Never curling over back no carried gaily.

Gait/Movement: Free and flowing. Soundness of movement of the utmost importance.

Coat: Texture fine, smooth, lustrous, short and close.

Colour: Brindle, pied or fawn. Tan, mouse and grey/blue highly undesirable.

(1) Brindle - a mixture of black and coloured hairs. May contain white provided brindle predominates.

(2) Pied - white predominates over brindle. Whites are classified with pieds for show purposes; but their eyelashes and eyerims should be black. In pieds the white should be clear with definite brindle patches and no ticking or black spots.

(3) Fawn - may contain brindle hairs but must have black eye lashes and eye rims.

Sizes: Ideal weight:

Dogs 12.5 kgs (28 lbs)

Bitches 11 kgs (24 lbs)

Soundness not to be sacrificed to smallness.

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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spanky   

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I am a first time owner, have a pied male (7yrs old) and a brindle female (2yrs old)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

I will let someone with a much better understanding of the history fill in this question.

3. How common is it in Australia?

From what I have been told - not overly common. That said I've noticed that more litters available on the Dol pages recently then there were 12mnths ago. I think they are gathering quite a following.

4. What is the average lifespan?

12yrs - I think

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Going on my two it can vary between the dogs, just like any breed I suppose.

My boy is willing to please and loves his people. He is quite dominant (and has aggression issues associated with this) and this can be the case with both male/female dogs.

My female is a very high drive dog. She will keep chasing the ball / toy / bucket / bucket handle / dust pan as long as you will keep throwing it (once you've recovered from the fact she's eaten another bucket / dust pan). She is very snuggly and if a lap is available she wants to be lying in it / over it.

They are funny dogs, they love being talked to and included in the family and they love attention. Mine are not velcro dogs, but they are very focused on me. If they have the choice between cuddling with someone (such as my OH) or me, I tend to end up with both dogs.... eventually. They are happy to meet new people and go out and about in the world.

Training is pretty easy. You just need to be persistant, as they can be a little bit stubborn, but once they have something learnt they don't tend to forget.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Mine get a 15-20min walk normally twice a day... this changes in summer depending on the heat.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I think so. As long as they understand that frenchies must be an inside dog, they do need a good pack leader, they suffer from heat stress which means activities with the dog should be planned appropriately. Oh and they take a while to toilet train 100%.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Not sure about a puppy - both of my dogs came to me over 12mnths old. My male was fine on his own during the day. I don't believe our female would cope with a single dog situation. So, I'd say it depends on the temperament of the dog.

9. How much grooming is required?

A brush once / twice a week and a bath about once a month.

For a short coated dog they do shed a fair bit of hair, so a regular brush does help.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

I've never had puppies, but both of mine are fine with small kids and older people. My male loves kids and tolerates a lot from them. Mine are not jumpy dogs and would only be a concern if zoomies are taking place. For a small dog they pack a punch when they hit your legs.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

I'll let one of the breeders answer this question.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If I was looking for a puppy, I would be checking:

  • Where / how are the puppies raised
  • Does the breeder xray breeding stock for hemivertebra
  • Do the parents have any breathing issues
  • What are the parents temperaments like
  • Does the breeder offer a health guarentee
  • Comparing the dam against the standard - particularly in terms to length & weight - & asking similar questions about the sire
  • How do the parents and previous offspring tolerate the heat
  • General questions around how did they become involved in frenchies, do they offer continued support etc

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spanky   
HI, I adore Frenchies!!!

Are they any good with cats?

If raised with them. I don't have cats, but my girl was raised with them and I've seen photos of her curled up with the cat asleep.

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Rain   

What is the price for a frenchie pup?

Are they food aggressive?

What health testing should be done by a breeder?

Thanks :thumbsup:

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NalaCleo   
What is the price for a frenchie pup?

Are they food aggressive?

What health testing should be done by a breeder?

Thanks :laugh:

As I have been looking to add a Frenchie pup to my family over the last few weeks I might be able to help answer :laugh:

What is the price for a Frenchie pup?:

They range from $2000 to $3000

What health testing should be done by a breeder?:

Hip and spinal X-rays should be done prior to breeding and some breeders x-ray their puppies spines as well before rehoming.

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Can I ask those who show their frenchie wether any particular colour does better? like in pugs the fawns are favored by judges over blacks.

EDITED...used the wring word!

Edited by sammy_ballerina

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Mjosa   

Relationship with breed.

I am a breeder and sometimes exhibitor. I have owned and bred Frenchies for 27 years.

Breed development.

The French Bulldog was once known as the Toy Bulldog, the British Bulldog in the 1800's used to have miniature pups, and the Nottingham lace makers prefered these little ones as they were good ratters, watch dogs and a first class companion dog.

When the Industrial Revolution happend in England in the mid 1800's the lacemakers made their way to France and took their little Bulldogs with them, the French became very fond of these little Bulldogs and they eventually went to Paris, where the well heeled Americans would holiday, they too liked this little dog.

At this time the Toy Bulldog had three types of ears, the rose ear like a British, a pricked ear and, now famous, Bat ear.

Between the French and the Americans, mainly the latter, they preferred the Bat Ear and between them they set about perfecting this type of ear, which is unique in dogdom, as it is the only breed that has the Bat ear.The French bulldog in those days were said to be small enough to fit into a man's top hat. Today they are getting a little too big, maximum weight for a male is 12.5 kg and a bitch 10-11kg.

The French Bulldog of today is a 100% companion dog.

How common in Australia.

When I got my first French Bulldog there were only three breeders in the whole country.

For years they were pretty much on the rare breed list, but as of the past few years, sadly in a way, they are getting too well known for the breeds best interest.

Life Span

9-13 years with a well bred French Bulldog.

Temperament and Personality

A well reared and socially adusted Frenchie is an absolute delight to own, as far as personality is concerned there is a saying about them and goes "A clown in a Philosphers coat." this aptly describes them. They are deep thinkers learn very very quickly what is required of them as far as manners are concerned and also house training, then on the other hand they can have you in absolute stitches with their comical ways.

Excercise

My dogs go for a 30 minute walk per day, but should you not feel like taking them, they are just as happy to stay at home.

Is this a breed for first time owners.

As long as the breeder explains the needs of this enchanting dog, when I sell my puppies I give a care and diet chart, stating their needs.

A French Bulldog, because of their flat faces and not an overlong neck can suffer heat stroke in a matter of minutes and die, this is something that I impress on purchasers, they must never be left outside in the heat of our summers, my dogs are fetched inside when the temperature is in the high 20's, also they do feel the cold so must be kept warm on cold days.

Solo dogs can they amuse themselves.

No a Frenchie is much better with a companion dog, they love companionship of their own kind.

Grooming

Because of their single coat my grooming of them is as follows.

Daily they have a damp chamois wiped over their coats to remove any dust or dirt, they have their fold on their faces wiped with a damp towel and then petroleum jelly wiped down the eye chanel fold, this avoids any irritation and redness that can be caused by the dampness of tears, in the evening before they go to bed I wash the eye fold to take out the petroleum jelly.

Once a month a bath.

Are they too boistorous for children and infirmed people

I never sell a puppy to a family who have children under the age of 10 years, and that has always been the way with the two other breeds that I have bred back in the 1970's, I feel children under this age do not appreciate how to handle a puppy, but I would consider selling to a family, if I have one, a retired desexed bitch or dog as they are able to cope better with small children. Too playful for an infirmed person, but the adults do make fantastic Pat dogs, visiting retirement homes and hospitals.

Hereditary Problems.

Yes they do, they can have severe spinal problems due to the way that the back is required in the standard, a slight rise over the hind quarters, hips are not so much a problem, they also can have slipping patellas due to the straightness of the stifle.

Questions Buyers should ask the breeder.

1. Should ask if the parents have been tested for spine, hips and patellas.

2. Exercising requirements for the dog. As said above the breeder should impress upon the buyer about the heat related problems.

3 What is the dogs diet what to feed them.

4 Are they barkers, the answer to this is a resounding no, they are quietest breed I have ever owned, they need to know this as they do not need neighbours complaining about a barking dog.

5 Are there any health guarantees on the puppy.

6 Are they generally friendly to people and other animals.

The French Bulldog is a breed that is not for everyone, and all purchasers go through a good deal of scrutiny before I even consider them as a future owner, they also have to sign a contract, I have two, one for the pet owner and one for the breeder/exhibitor.

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Mjosa   

Now to answer some of the questions that posters have asked.

If a Frenchie has been brought up in a house that also has cats, they are excellent, they count them as one of their own :driving:

When I have pupppies I charge between $3000-$3500

They can be food aggressive even as tiny babies around their dinner plates they will have a bit of a go.

I feed all mine seperately, no use inviting trouble and also by doing this you know exactly how much each dog is having.

I Xray dogs and bitches that I have kept for breeding.

This is done at 15 months of age when they go to have their first booster shots as up until they are 12 months of age, the bone is like cartelege, some puppies that I have exported to the USA NZ and UK I have xrayed for spine and hips, they do not leave here until they are about 5 months of age, although the bone is not yet set, you have an idea that there are no severe hemivertabrae problems.

A Frenchie should never ever be allowed to jump up and down on furniture or ever go up and down stairs, as they can put either vertabra or discs out and that can be a very costly if not life threatening situation.

There is a Fr enchie near me, he was bred in Qld., at four years of age and living in a two story house and a split level block, so he was constantly up and down stairs, he collapsed in the hind quarters, slipped a disc and it cost his owners $6000, yes you read it right, this happened just three weeks ago, to have it fixed, he will always have a weakness in that area now.

As for colour preference, a judge should not have one he should be judging the dogs on their merits not just colour alone, but we know that is not always the case, for instance I know that a fawn black mask baby trotting around the ring just captures hearts, I have had a lot of baby in group and in show results with the fawn black mask babies that I have shown.

As the dogs mature it seems that the most common colour, brindle does the most winning, but of course they out number the fawns and the pieds. Now speaking of pieds it is one of the most difficult colour to breed correctly, as the standard requires a clear white coat with no ticking, I have seen some beautiful specimens in the ring and are not looked at because they are ticked in varying degrees and a judge who has some understanding of the standard in regard to colour will not put them up unless the competition is of lesser conformation to the ticked dog.

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I have owned Frenchies for about 9 years. Have never bred but my passion for the breed is huge. I have owned a top winning specialty BIS French Bulldog and a highly awarded bitch.

I am very disheartened with the price that French Bulldog puppies are selling for these days given the big gene pool that is available. 5 years ago the average price of the breed was only $1800.00

In judging the French Bulldog type, soundness and quality is very important.

They are a breed which require dedication in preserving the breed characteristics.

Yes they do have hereditary problems. Stenotic nares, elogated soft palates, spinal defects. They are a hemi vertabrae breed.

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1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Breeder/exhibitor/international judge/secretary of FBCNSW - started in the breed in 1986.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Country of origin France. Countries of development UK, USA, Germany. Frenchies are regarded as companion animals and in FCI countries (Federation Cynoligique Internationale) are in the Toy & Companion Group. The history of the breed is well documented in many outstanding books which are readily available. Recommended reading: The French Bulldog by Steve Eltinge (out-of-print and expensive but worth trying to get a copy), Celebrating Frenchies by Arlie Alford (www.frenchbullytin.com), The French Bulldog by Muriel Lee (Kennel Club Classics series available from Amazon.com).

3. How common is it in Australia?

500 puppies registered nationally in 2008. The breed is currently enjoying a period of popularity.

4. What is the average lifespan?

10-12 years however many frenchies live well over 13 years of age.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Commonly referred to as the 'clown of the dog world', they are endearing little dogs who will steal your heart.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Exercise requirements are minimal but essential for a healthy happy little dog. Keep your frenchie fit. He should not be overweight and should be well muscled. Being a brachycephalic (flat-faced) breed care MUST be taken during hot weather so it's best to let them exercise mornings or evenings outside of the heat of the day. The frenchie is a little athlete with a lot of speed and flexibility. They are agile and can jump from a standing position, much like a cat.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Very much so provided the owner has done his/her homework beforehand. Commonsense and backup from the breeder at all times. When you buy a dog, you are buying the breeder as well. Breeders should be willing to act as your mentor for the entire life of your dog.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Frenchies need companionship. Not recommended for people who work long hours.

9. How much grooming is required?

Grooming is minimal. Bathe fortnightly. Regular brushing keeps the coat soft and shiny. The main areas of concern are ears and face folds which must be kept clean and dry.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Despite their small stature, frenchies have an incredible power weight ratio. They are built like a miniature mastiff and are very strong. Having said that, provided you have a frenchie with a calm soft nature, they are fine around the young and elderly. A well socialised, well bred frenchie with correct temperament for the breed would be fine.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Elongated soft palate, pinched nostrils, spine abnormalities, pyloric stenosis, slipping patella (knee caps) are considered hereditary and do occur in the breed. FBCNSW has a puppy booklet with detailed information about common breed problems in the Australian population of frenchies. Refer to the club website www.frenchbulldogclubnsw.asn.au for a comprehensive article about health related issues. Puppy buyers should do their homework before contacting breeders and try to learn as much as possible about health related problems.

FBCNSW devotes a lot of energy into educating the public about our wonderful breed. Unfortunately with increased popularity and demand for puppies, the frenchie has attracted many breeders with little or no experience of french bulldogs and french bulldog breeding. Health testing is recommended on all dogs and bitches before breeding and indeed members of FBCNSW sign a code of ethics which they (hopefully) abide by. At the moment it is very much a BUYER BEWARE situation so please do your homework before buying a dog.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Try and visit the home and meet the breeders, their dogs - in particular the dam of the litter and the sire if he is owned by the breeder.

Are the frenchies living in a suitable environment, clean, well socialised and well cared for?

Are the breeders involved in showing, obedience, or other dog related activities?

Are the breeders a member of a recognised breed club?

Do the breeders have one or more breeds?

Have the parents been x-rayed for spine and hip abnormalities and are they clear of any major defects?

Are the parents good breathers?? Has either parent had soft palate surgery??

Have the puppies been x-rayed and are they clear of major defects? (Preliminary x-ray screening can be done over 8 weeks of age.)

Are the puppies microchipped?? It is compulsory in NSW to microchip all companion animals - this must be done by the breeder before the puppy leaves for his/her new home.


What health guarantees can the breeder provide??

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What is the price for a frenchie pup?

Are they food aggressive?

What health testing should be done by a breeder?

Thanks :eek:

Average price for a frenchie pet on the limited register is $2,000 - $2,500. Price should be inclusive of vaccinations, microchip, and health checks. Be prepared to wait and buy from a responsible breeder. Don't let your heart rule your head and be sure your are dealing with someone you can trust. Responsible breeders have a history of club activity and involvement, are active in showing and/or obedience trials. They health test and study pedigrees. They have a thorough knowledge of the breed and should be able to answer any questions you may have. Don't be afraid to ask - responsible breeders expect this of you. If you find yourself dealing with a breeder who isn't interested in finding out about your suitability as an owner, beware. Responsible breeders want their puppies to go to good homes and will "grill" you thoroughly before agreeing to sell you a puppy.

Frenchies may be food aggressive - it depends on the individual dog.

Recommended breeding practices include x-raying spine and hips of dogs and bitches over 12 months of age and prior to breeding. Puppies may be xrayed for spinal defects about 8 weeks of age before leaving the breeder.

Hope this is of some help.

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HI, I adore Frenchies!!!

Are they any good with cats?

Usually no problem when introducing a frenchie puppy to a cat household. Many frenchie owners also have cats.

Hope this helps.

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How do they cope being with a large dog? Can they handle a little rough play and hold their own? Would you (if you were a breeder) sell a pup to a house hold with a big dog?

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How do they cope being with a large dog? Can they handle a little rough play and hold their own? Would you (if you were a breeder) sell a pup to a house hold with a big dog?

R-L

I have owned all at the same time, French Bulldogs, Bulldogs, Bullmastiffs and Kelpies. I have never had a problem with them not being able to cope. In saying that playtimes were strictly supervised.

If they are healthy they can handle a good amount of rough and tumble.

eta

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Edited by stonebridge

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How do they cope being with a large dog? Can they handle a little rough play and hold their own? Would you (if you were a breeder) sell a pup to a house hold with a big dog?

R-L

I have owned all at the same time, French Bulldogs, Bulldogs, Bullmastiffs and Kelpies. I have never had a problem with them not being able to cope. In saying that playtimes were strictly supervised.

If they are healthy they can handle a good amount of rough and tumble.

eta

Thanks stonebridge, would you leave your frenchie unsupervised with a big dog with a playful temperament but not overly excited. for example you have to go to work and you leave them in the yard? or would you have separate yards for them.

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How do they cope being with a large dog? Can they handle a little rough play and hold their own? Would you (if you were a breeder) sell a pup to a house hold with a big dog?

R-L

I have owned all at the same time, French Bulldogs, Bulldogs, Bullmastiffs and Kelpies. I have never had a problem with them not being able to cope. In saying that playtimes were strictly supervised.

If they are healthy they can handle a good amount of rough and tumble.

eta

Thanks stonebridge, would you leave your frenchie unsupervised with a big dog with a playful temperament but not overly excited. for example you have to go to work and you leave them in the yard? or would you have separate yards for them.

No I wouldnt leave them together unsupervised like that.

All my dogs over the years have always had their own space when we are not home. Whether it be crated or outside runs.

They are never left together.

We had an older Bulldog that we would lift up on our bed while we were at work. She was the only one that we would leave out.

Now, one of our Bullmastiffs we can not crate her as she found out she can get out of them

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Kirty   

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

First time owner

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Louis is a barrel of laughs. Everything he does is funny. He is cheeky, outgoing, happy, bouncy and affectionate.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Not much. Louis is happy with a short walk, but just as happy to laze around the house.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I think so. Louis has been a dream dog really. Toilet training was a bit slow, but otherwise he has been very easy.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

If they have lots of human company, yes. Otherwise, I'd say they'd do better with a companion.

9. How much grooming is required?

Very little. He needs the folds of his skin cleaned but thats about it. Doesn't seem to shed as much as many other short haired dogs.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

No. Louis lives with my small children (2yo and 5yo) and he is great with them. He does jump up but settles very quickly.

A few other things... Louis is great with other dogs of all sizes. He plays with my MIL's SWF and loves to romp with my big dogs. He is fine with cats (does like to chase them though, but not in a nasty way). He is a funny little character. :)

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I have always been fascinated with the Frenchie, mainly with their personality :thumbsup: I have heard that many bitches have to have a caesarian due to the size of the head, not dissimilar to the reasons a British Bulldog needs a caesarian to whelp puppies.

Is this true and I would be interested to know what percentage of bitches undergo a caesarian. Also, would this be why the going price for puppies is high, or is it directly to do with the popularity of the breed?

Thanks

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