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Troy

Dobermann

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Troy   

The Dobermann

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=166 )

Group: Group 6 (Utility)

General Appearance: Medium size, muscular and elegant, with well set body. Of proud carriage, compact and tough. Capable of great speed.

Characteristics: Intelligent and firm of character, loyal and obedient.

Temperament: Bold and alert. Shyness or viciousness very highly undesirable.

Head And Skull: In proportion to body. Long, well filled out under eyes and clean cut, with good depth of muzzle. Seen from above and side, resembles an elongated blunt wedge. Upper part of head flat and free from wrinkle. Top of skull flat, slight stop; muzzle line extending parallel to top line of skull. Cheeks flat, lips tight. Nose solid black in black dogs, solid dark brown in brown dogs, solid dark grey in blue dogs and light brown in fawn dogs. Head out of balance in proportion to body, dish faced, snipy or cheeky very highly undesirable.

Eyes: Almond-shaped, not round, moderately deep set, not prominent, with lively, alert expression. Iris of uniform colour, ranging from medium to darkest brown in black dogs, the darker shade being more desirable. In browns, blues, or fawns, colour of iris blends with that of markings, but not of lighter hue than markings; light eyes in black dogs highly undesirable.

Ears: Small, neat, set high on head. Normally dropped, but may be erect.

Mouth: Well developed, solid and strong with a complete dentition and a perfect, regular and complete scissor bite, i.e. the upper teeth closely overlapping the lower teeth and set square to the jaws. Evenly placed teeth. Undershot, overshot or badly arranged teeth highly undesirable.

Neck: Fairly long and lean, carried with considerable nobility; slightly convex and in proportion to shape of dog. Region of nape very muscular. Dewlap and loose skin undesirable.

Forequarters: Shoulder blade and upper arm meet at an angle of 90 degrees. Shoulder blade and upper arm approximately equal in length. Short upper arm relative to shoulder blade highly undesirable. Legs seen from front and side, perfectly straight and parallel to each other from elbow to pastern; muscled and sinewy, with round bone in proportion to body structure. Standing or gaiting, elbow lies close to brisket.

Body: Square, height measured vertically from ground to highest point at withers equal to length from forechest to rear projection of upper thigh. Forechest well developed. Back short and firm, with strong, straight topline sloping slightly from withers to croup; bitches may be slightly longer to loin. Ribs deep and well sprung, reaching to elbow. Belly fairly well tucked-up. Long, weak, or roach backs highly undesirable.

Hindquarters: Legs parallel to each other and moderately wide apart. Pelvis falling away from spinal column at an angle of about 30 degrees. Croup well filled out. Hindquarters well developed and muscular; long, well bent stifle; hocks turning neither in nor out. When standing, hock to heel perpendicular to the ground.

Feet: Well arched, compact, and cat-like, turning neither in nor out. Long, flat deviating feet and /or weak pasterns highly undesirable.

Tail: Docked: Docked at first or second joint: appears to be a continuation of spine without material drop.

Undocked: Appears to be a continuation of spine without material drop, kink or deformity. May be raised and carried freely when the dog is moving or standing.

Gait/Movement: Elastic, free, balanced and vigorous, with good reach in forequarters and driving power in hindquarters. When trotting, should have strong rear drive, with apparent rotary motion of hindquarters. Rear and front legs thrown neither in nor out. Back remains strong and firm.

Coat: Smooth, short, hard, thick and close lying. Imperceptible undercoat on neck permissible. Hair forming a ridge on back of neck and/or along spine highly undesirable.

Colour: Definite black, brown, blue or fawn (Isabella) only, with rust red markings. Markings to be sharply defined, appearing above each eye, on muzzle, throat and forechest, an all legs and feet and below tail. White markings of any kind highly undesirable.

Sizes: Ideal height:

Dogs 69 cms (27 ins) at withers

Bitches 65 cms (25.5 ins) at withers

Considerable deviation from this ideal undesirable.

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Owner

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

The Doberman had its beginnings in the city of Apolda, located in the state of Thuringia, Germany. Louis Dobermann was reputed to be a tax collector in this area, and was also responsible for keeping the strays in the local dog pound. Herr Dobermann carried money on his person, and wanted a dog for self protection. His ultimate aim was to possess a dog that was of average build, so that it could be intimidating to intruders or robbers. A dog with a short, smooth coat would be easy to care for, with a minimum of grooming. The dog would also have to have great stamina, be intelligent, and display alertness, and even aggression. So when he decided to use different breeds to develop this special guard dog, Herr Dobermann had a very specific end in mind. His choices were not slap hazard, he picked and chose the dogs very carefully. This is one of the reasons why the Doberman Pinscher is referred to as "a man-made dog". Unfortunately, he did not keep any written records. However, some very good conjectures can be drawn from the knowledge we have of the anatomy and temperament of the Doberman, and the knowledge of the type of dogs that were indigenous to that area and time. From HISTORY OF THE

DOBERMAN PINSCHER by Malcolm Dupre

3. How common is it in Australia?

Not as common as they used to be and now that its harder to get tails docked I feel numbers will dwindle further.

4. What is the average lifespan?

I'd say 12-14

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Just going from my dogs personally, love pats and cuddles, very smart, very pushy, in your face and demanding, always pushing the boundaries. Both my boys arent/werent very good guard dogs, however they are/were still young, destructive and gogogo.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Ive heard and seen older dobes that are quite the lounge lizard however I wouldnt say thats the norm. My boys were still youngsters and needed alot of exercise. I can not miss a day or I will pay for it. Im lucky I live on acreage so my dogs get to free run but should I live in town I would recommend 2 walks a day and hour each would be ideal, at the very least one walk at an hour. PLUS they need lots of mental exercise, not just physical.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I would say NO. but then it depends on the lifestyle of the person and whether they have plenty of support from their breeder and understand the importnce of setting boundaries for a dobe. Give an inch, they'll take a mile. My first response would be no, though.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

NO! They crave human interaction and beiong on their own for long periods is just asking for trouble.

9. How much grooming is required?

Not much. A bath when needed, nails done regularly. I never bush my dog but a rubber mit would probably be enjoyed.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Yes i think so. I cant let my dobe out when the kids are on their bikes or the kids out if my dobe is flying around the place. He doesnt look where he is going and will just barrell into anyone and anything once he gets going. He and also quite a few I know have a jumping up problem. Its probably more of a training issue however it hasnt been an easy to get him to stop doing it. He hasnt jumped on kids but will jump on adults, old or otherwise :vomit:

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Von Willebrands, Cardiomyopathy, Wobblers

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Could you elaberate on Cardiomyopathy, Wobblers.

Cervical Vertebral Instability (CVI), commonly known as "Wobblers" is the compression on the spinal cord between the 5th, 6th and 7th cervical vertebrae located in the neck. It usually develops gradually and is seen in the affected canine typically between 7 and 8 years of age.

Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease of the heart muscle which causes the heart to enlarge and not function properly.

I have been researching dobes. and found the above to be good explanations. (taken from www.aegisdobes.com.au)

Edited by CruiseNRoxy

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1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Owner/breeder/exhibitor

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

10-14years. Unfortunately dobes aren't living as long as they should be due to Dilated Cardiomyeopathy- which is taking dobes as young as 5years old.

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Very loyal, smart, pushy. Dobes have a really great personality- they make you laugh, most try to please their owners. Dobermanns are very protective over their property/owners. They have been labelled 'velcro dogs' as they stick with their owners.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Depending on the individual dog and the size of the backyard- about an hour per day.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

It depends on the person/family. Our first dog was a dobermann. They can be very pushy and need leadership from their owners. The owners need to set ground rules/boundaries and stick to them. A responsible breeder who as assessed puppies/mature dogs temperaments will not place an overly strong willed dobe in a first dog home.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Not really. Dobes aren't a breed that you can just shut in your backyard. They need to be included in the owners life.

9. How much grooming is required?

Minimal. Nail trimming weekly, ear cleaning and a bath.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

A dobermann can be taught to be gentle with children/elderly. They can become very excited with visitors but should be trained to not jump on people. I've had younger children visit my house and my dobes are not allowed to rush up to them. Some just 'know' though, and will sit down or lay down with children. As always kids and dogs should never be left unsupervised.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

The biggest issue is Dilated Cardiomyopathy. There is no cure for this disease, and often once diagnosed, time left is not long. Please do your research with any breeder you buy from. Ask about this disease.

von Willebrands Disease: Dogs will be Clear, Carrier, or Affected. For more info see

http://dobermannnsw.homestead.com/healthissues.html

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Ask lots and lots of questions!!! Beware of any breeder who avoids questions or does not appear happy in answering!

-vWD status of both parents. Affected should not be mated to Affected. In my opinion affected should not be mated to carrier either.

-Ask about longevity. Ask if both parents are alive, if not, what did they die from and at what age. Ask the same question about grandparents too.

-What health tests have been done on parents (vWD, heart ultrasound, blood tests, thryoid, liver)

-Temperament of parents

Edited by africandreams

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What breeds are thought to have gone into creating the dobermann?

Different sources will quote different breeds, but the ones that most often feature are:

greyhound, weimaraner, rottweiler, beauceron, great dane, german pinscher, 'old' german shepherd dog, german shorthaired pointer.

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1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Owner

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

others have given pretty decent descriptions - I agree with them

3. How common is it in Australia?

Hardly ever see one, and I have heard from breeders that other breeders have stopped with the introduction of the laws against docking.

4. What is the average lifespan?

10-12

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Extremely affectionate with their owners, tends to bond to one person although in my experience do well with children (if well trained - the kids and the dogs), aloof with strangers but not aggressive, protective (this seems to depend on the breeder though), intelligent, 'velcro' - for example, given the option, mine will even accompany me into the shower even though he doesn't seem to find it a pleasant experience, he just always likes to be touching me, energetic

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Needs a walk every day (and a decent walk at that) and a run off-lead at least once, preferably more, per week. Needs a lot of mental stimulation.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

I would say yes, but it's definitely not a breed you could just buy on a whim. I think a first time owner would be ok so long as they had taken the time to research the breed and established a good relationship with some breeders. Some dobermans are more laid-back than others, and a good breeder can match the owner with a dog that suits their needs.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

No. But so long as you have given them a lot of exercise prior to leaving them alone, I have gotten away with 6-8 hours and not had any issues. He loves my cat though so perhaps in his case that counts as company.

9. How much grooming is required?

They have a very short coat which washes and dries easily. I don't brush mine really except for fun (like if I'm grooming the cat, sometimes he likes a turn).

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

No-one who doesn't want or isn't capable of producing a well-trained dog should have a doberman. Mine is fine with little kids, he absolutely loves them, and unlike adults, he is not aloof upon meeting them for the first time, he seems to recognise that they pose little in the way of a real threat. He tried to jump on them when he was a puppy, but has been trained out of this, and now knows not to run up to anyone. We introduce them under supervision, bring the child to the dog etc but then he treats them like his long-lost best friend. Matches their excitement and energy levels.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Heaps sadly. This is a breed where you need to make sure your breeder has carried out all the tests. I've had breeders say they don't believe in that sort of thing, but those are breeders to avoid. A breeder should not breed two carriers of VW, because whilst it's harmless in the parents, this means there's a chance the puppies will have the condition, again though, I have seen even some very big name breeders in Australia who do this. Von Willebrands, Cardiomyopathy, Wobblers

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I just wanted to say since I didnt mention it in my post and may have giving some the wrong impression. My dobe is excellent with my kids and other peoples kids. He can be calm and very gentle, very well behaved and is obedience trained, however being a young dog he is full of energy and when on the go,he is pretty full on. Just wanted to point that out incase anyone thought I wasnt capable of producing a well trained dog as what I wrote in my first post made it seem like he isnt good with kids.

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teb77   

Hi All,

Im not sure where I'm supposed to post this???? But has anyone bought a Fireax dobe? I'm narrowing down breeders and would like to know people's thoughts. I want a family pet.

Thank you!!!!!

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QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc) Owner of three 11, 9 and 4 months old

2. Where and why was the breed first developed? A tax collector invented them in Germany because he wanted an agile dog that would persuade people into paying their taxes. His last name was Dobermann. They are a mix between quite a few breeds.

3. How common is it in Australia? Less common now with the docking ban

4. What is the average lifespan? Around 10 years although some are living longer now days

5. What is the general temperament/personality? Alert, sooky, loyal, active, goofy

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult? 1 hour high intensity or 2 hour walks a day depending on the dog

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with? I coped when I was 10 years old... but I was very dedicated and you must be able to control and train them and willing to put in the hard yards but I dont want to discourage people because I would love to see more dobes around

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods? I'm not too sure they are very smart and active so I wouldnt advise leaving them alone all day (my youngest goes to daycare)

9. How much grooming is required? Little

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)? I would say yes but it depends on the dog, they are extremely gentle when trained and are used alot in elderly homes in the USA

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of? Yes, I would pick your breeder carefully

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be) All of the below.

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helen   

Just hoping someone can help me with this. If a dobe has a slightly sloping topline on the stack as per the standard will the topline be sloped when trotting in the ring or will it appear level on the move?

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1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

Owner of four

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

as above, Germany, by tax collector Louis Dobermann as a personal guard

3. How common is it in Australia?

Not very now that the docking ban is in

4. What is the average lifespan?

10 - 12 years

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Loyal, human-like, intelligent, stubborn, affectionate, goofy and too smart for their own good!

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

1-2 hours

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

not easily, you have to be dedicated to training and raising them right otherwise they can get head strong and their sheer strength in the wrong hands can be dangerous

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

I'd say no, but depending on the age and exercise/toys given before being left alone for longer periods, you never know

9. How much grooming is required?

next to none, quick brush maybe once a week, bath once every couple of months.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

can be yes

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

VWD, DCM, Wobblers, HD

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

You want hips and elbows x-rayed. VWD status of sire and dam. Holter echo monitor findings. Whether any dogs in the lines died from cardio and how far back are those dogs in the pedigrees. There are new tests in the USA that test for ONE of the genes known to cause DCM, they should be available in Aus shortly so soon there will be no excuse on it although even if a dog carries the gene it does not necessarily mean it will die from it or pass it on at all.

I'd ask the breeder where he/she titles their dogs. No titles means NO NO in my book. If your dog is not good enough to be titled in conformation or obedience etc then that dog should not be bred unless MAYBE retired due to injury or bred to a dog that is titled. Two untitled dogs screams back yard breeder and I would run far away.

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bladek9   

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

OWNED 2 MALE AND FEMALE,SHOW & PET & IN PROCESS OF ADOPTING A GIRL FROM RESCUE.

6. What is the average lifespan?

FOR ME OUT OF 2 DOGS, ITS ONLY 6.5YRS

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

I FOUND ME BEING FEMALE, THE MALE DOG BONDED BETTER WITH ME AND THE GIRL TOOK TO MY HUSBAND AND 3 BOYS BEST.THEY ARE QUICK TO LEARN BUT THE PUPPY STAGE CAN BE VERY TRYING.THEY ARE VELCRO DOGS AND THEY TALK WITH THEIR EYES.THEY ARE SENSITIVE TO YOUR EMOTIONS.. THEY HARDLY COMPLAIN, EVEN WHEN THEY HAVE PAIN SO YOU HAVE TO WATCH CAREFULLY IF SOMETHING IS NOT QUITE RIGHT.THEY LIKE TO HUNT THINGS IN YOUR BACKYARD, SO WATCH OUT LIZARDS AND LOW FLYING BIRDS.THEY ARE GREAT WITH OTHER DOGS IF SOCIALISED FROM PUPS. MY ENTIRE MALE WOULD LET MY SISTERS MALAMUTE ON HIS BED WITH HIS BONE, WHEN HE VISITED BECAUSE HE ENJOYED THE COMPANY OF HIM.THEY HAVE FUNNY ANTICS LIKE SLEEPING ON THEIR BACKS WITH THEIR LEGS IN THE AIR, LOOKING LIKE FRUIT BATS WITH THEIR EARS STICKING UP OR RUNNING OFF WITH THINGS OUT OF THE CLOTHES BASKET TO HIDE IN THE BACKYARD.THEY PLAY HIDE AND SEEK WITH YOU IN THE HOUSE OR AS MY FEMALE USED TO DO, PLAY PRETEND "NASTY DOG" GAME.THEY KNOW ITS A GAME AND WHEN YOU SAY ITS OVER, THEY STOP. THEY HAVE A WONDERFUL HEART WARMING WAY OF GREETING YOU WITH LIPS CURLED BACK AND PEARLY FRONT TEETH SHOWING WITH THE CORNERS OF THEIR MOUTH CURLED BACK. THE MOST LOVELIEST SMILE I HAVE EVER SEEN.....

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

lIKE ANY OTHER LARGE DOG I GUESS BUT IF YOU CANT DO IT SOME DAYS, THEY DONT FRET. JUST BEING INSIDE WITH YOU IN THE HOUSE OR CAR OR MAYBE EVEN HAVING A GAME WITH OUTSIDE IN YOUR BACKYARD, MAKES UP FOR IT.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

NOT SO MUCH FOR FIRST TIME DOG OWNER.IT WOULD DEPEND ON THE PERSON I GUESS.THEIR PUPPY STAGE CAN BE QUITE TRYING. THE MALES CAN GO THROUGH A TEENAGE DOMINANT STAGE THAT IS NORMAL, BUT YOU NEED TO ADDRESS AT THE TIME. IF THE PERSON HAD GOOD INSTRUCTION AND BACKUP FROM A BREEDER, IT COULD BE OK.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

I DONT THINK SO AND IT ISNT FAIR FOR THE DOG.SOME CAN GET QUITE NEUROTIC IF LEFT TO THEIR OWN DEVICES.THEY LOVE HUMAN COMPANIONSHIP.

9. How much grooming is required?

HARDLY ANY.MITT IS GOOD FOR A ONCE OVER. HAVING NATURAL EARS IN AUSTRALIA, PRONE TO EAR INFECTIONS IF WATER GETS IN THE EARS WHEN BATHED.BEST NOT TO BATH TOO OFTEN AS SKIN CAN BE MORE SENSITIVE AND CAN GET IRRITATIONS. NAILS CAN BE FILED DOWN IF YOU ARE NOT CONFIDENT WITH CLIPPING.START THIS REGIME AS A PUP.IF THEY SPEND A LOT OF TIME INSIDE WITH YOU, THEY CAN FEEL THE COLD IN WINTER WHEN OUTSIDE, SO MAY NEED RUGGING AS THEIR COAT IS SO FINE.AUSSIE DOGS ARE PROBABLY NOT USED TO TEMPS LIKE OVERSEAS.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

MY 3 SONS WERE RAISED WITH DOBES.I NEVER HAD A PROBLEM. THEY GOT BOWLED OVER SOMETIMES BUT THEY LEARNT TO LIVE WITH IT.(KIDS THAT IS!)BASIC TRAINING JUST HAPPENS NATURALLY AS YOU BOND WITH YOUR DOG AND TREAT EACH OTHER WITH RESPECT.DONT TOLERATE JUMPING UP. DONT ENCOURAGE YOUR PUP TO DO ANYTHING YOU DONT WANT IT TO DO LATER ON.IF YOU DONT WANT THEM ON THE BED, DONT ALLOW IT FROM A YOUNG AGE. YOU HAVE TO WATCH THAT TEENAGERS DONT STIR THEM UP TOO MUCH IN PLAY. THE DOGS DONT GET AGGRESSIVE, THEY JUST START TO TEAR AROUND THE PLACE IN EXCITEMENT.YOU NEED TO BE A LITTLE FIRM WITH MALE DOGS WHEN THEY GO THROUGH THE ' TRYING IT ON' STAGE.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

DCM(Dilated Cardiomyopathy)IS THE THING TO WATCH FOR I THINK , MOST OF ALL. I HAVE LOST 2 DOGS WITH IT NOW. MY FEMALE WAS ONLY 5, SHOWED NO SIGNS BUT DROPPED DEAD AT OUR FEET, AFTER CHASING BIRDS AROUND IN THE BACKYARD THAT DAY.HER MOTHER IS 11 & STILL ALIVE AND HER SISTERS AND BROTHERS ARE FINE, SO I DREW THE SHORT STRAW.YOU JUST DONT KNOW. I WOULD SUGGEST THAT YOU LOOK RIGHT INTO THE BLOODLINES AND ASK ALL THE QUESTIONS. TRY TO CHOOSE A BREEDER WHERE THEY HAVE DONE EXTENSIVE SCREENING.THIS DISEASE IS A REAL PROBLEM IN DOBERMANS.

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Just noting that everyone keeps bringing up Cardio.

The DNA Testing done through the USA tests either positive or negative for the Cardio Gene in Dobermanns. Using this tool will help breeders to hopefully lessen the amount of Cardio in our breed, but it only tests for ONE GENE - they are not yet sure if it is the major gene related to cardio but at least it is a start.

The breed average lifespan is 10 to 11 years for males and 11 to 12 years for females.

We lost our old girl at 13 and our old boy at 10.5. Dogs behind our current breeding lines have lived up to 14 & 15 yrs both male and female. Looking for longevity behind lines is a good indication that there is general good health there.

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Podengo   

Standard cardio testing in the USA involves yearly 24hr holter and echo tests, as well as Dr. Muers cardio gene test. The university that does the holter read outs will process results from anywhere in the world (I asked the organiser of the project), so breeders should be buying digital holter monitors from this university and emailing the files through to them for assessment.

At this point results of the cardio test don't mean much, Dobes negative for the gene have died of DCM at young ages (like 3, 4 year olds), while some positive homozygous dogs are in their teens. It's more for research purpose than to help puppy buyers.

Like Bisart said, I would be looking at overall longevity in the pedigree, COD, and I would be interested in the results of holtor and echo tests.

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Stitch   

We have had two Dobes over a 13 year period, we did our research and purchased from well known breeders.

At 7 years old our first Dobe, a girl, deteriorated very suddenly and had to be PTS due to Wobblers.

Our second Dobe, a boy, developed heart problems at 5 years of age and had to be PTS.

Two different breeders! When I told the breeder of our second Dobe, she came up with many reasons how the heart problems could happen but totally lacked any empathy with the situation at all! We think she was more interested in absolving herself of any blame ........ even though no one had blamed her!

Both situations were heartbreaking for us .... :cry: ......we will not be getting another Dobe.

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We have had two Dobes over a 13 year period, we did our research and purchased from well known breeders.

At 7 years old our first Dobe, a girl, deteriorated very suddenly and had to be PTS due to Wobblers.

Our second Dobe, a boy, developed heart problems at 5 years of age and had to be PTS.

Two different breeders! When I told the breeder of our second Dobe, she came up with many reasons how the heart problems could happen but totally lacked any empathy with the situation at all! We think she was more interested in absolving herself of any blame ........ even though no one had blamed her!

Both situations were heartbreaking for us .... :cry: ......we will not be getting another Dobe.

That's very sad and also very unlucky. I have had 4 Dobes during my life so far (2 were family pets when I was a child and 2 have been my own as an adult) and the 3 that are no longer with us all had to be PTS at the age of 9yrs. The 2 from my childhood ended up with arthritis in the hips/legs and had trouble getting up and down and my heart dog had Lymphoma and was PTS 4 years ago. He had no other health issues during his life. I currently own a 2 and a half yr old Dobe who is the picture of health and am hoping he continues to be.

Sometimes its's just a case of bad luck. My sister had 2 boxers, different breeders and both suffered from allergies, both had surgery on legs and also had to have lumps removed constantly. These 2 dogs cost her a fortune in vet bills and now, although she loves the breed still she will never get another one even though I have explained that there are plenty of Boxers out there who have none of these problems and it was a case of bad luck or poor breeder choice.

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Prag   

Hello,

I was wondering if anyone could tell me anything they know about about either Bisart Dobermans or Yiyanda Doberman breeders?

I am looking into getting a puppy and would like to know as much as possible.

Thanks

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