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Troy

German Shepherd Dog

175 posts in this topic

First time posting in this group and I hate to see how belligerent some GSD owners/breeders can be and how lost people get talking about lines and angulations.

I love my GSD because his intelligence, loyalty and more importantly his character. He is a very confident dog that can handle any situation without been fearful or aggressive, he is a dog that I can leave with my family when I'm travelling and I know he won't hesitate to put his life on the line to protect them. He is a dog that loves my little kids and is incredible patient with them. He is a dog that adores me and follows me from room to room only to be close to me. That is why I love my GSD and not because he is from German lines.

Below is a picture of him and my Mastiff relaxing at the beach yesterday

post-35613-1282443215_thumb.jpg

Edited by fermanrique

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RachelP   

First time post, and I've read the entire GSD forum discussion.

We are looking to buy a german shepherd dog for companionship (not showing or breeding etc), the dog's health and xrays are very important to us. I wanted to know if there are many GSD breeders that breed for straighter backs? This is a genuine question, as a prospective owner. I've done quite a bit of research on the breed standard, so I assure you, I'm not trying to insight a debate on this. Just trying to get some information.

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Kavik   

Hi Rachel

Yes there are breeders who breed the style GSD you are after, though you are more likely to find that sort of shape in working line dogs.

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Leelaa17   

I want to ask a question about GSD and the ones in the shows..

this might sound very amatuer-like... I am a first time owner of GSD - I have two, one is a year and a half and the other is 6 months and they are my life.

But it really makes me upset when I see GSD will the sloping back (roached back is the term I have heard - when the back slops down towards the ground and their back legs are stretched out behind them)........... some of the ones I have seen dont seem to walk or run properly - and I know that the show people prefer this and they wouldnt take on my boy or girl because their backs are so straight and dont slope at all...

but it isnt normal for their backs to do that and me particular vet said it isnt good for them when they get older...

is it wrong of me to hate the look of it?? It just upsets me - I feel that making their backs do that is in the same class as docking tails and clipping ears?......

what i also want to know is WHY they do it???

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ish   

When they're puppies, we hold them over our knees with their front legs in one hand and their back legs in the other hand and gently but firmly bend them over our knee to help the roach form. If you do it right, they can't walk, so they're easy to catch, and they always win at the shows :)

You need to do some research on GSD anatomy to start with (a roached back and sloped back are different things), read the breed standard and then visit some shows. I would also suggest getting a new vet seeing as you have GSDs and yours doesn't seem to be knowledgable about them.

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Leelaa17,

But it really makes me upset when I see GSD will the sloping back (roached back is the term I have heard - when the back slops down towards the ground and their back legs are stretched out behind them)........... some of the ones I have seen dont seem to walk or run properly - and I know that the show people prefer this and they wouldnt take on my boy or girl because their backs are so straight and dont slope at all...

but it isnt normal for their backs to do that and me particular vet said it isnt good for them when they get older...

is it wrong of me to hate the look of it?? It just upsets me - I feel that making their backs do that is in the same class as docking tails and clipping ears?......

what i also want to know is WHY they do it???

Have you noticed that a GSD is stood differently in the rear to other breeds? When you bring a GSDs legs 4 square (as the other breeds are stood) the slope becomes less obvious.

You need to inform yourself about the function of the GSD firstly. The GSD is a trotting breed designed to cover the most amount of ground with minimum of effort. You cannot compare the gait of a GSD to the general dog in the street or other breeds which is why most people take exception to the GSD. Many other breeds are designed for different purposes, many are not trotting breeds, many are not working breeds and many do not rely on trotting over large distances.

Many straight stifled breeds are not ground covering in their gait in the same sense that a GSD is and do not have the necessary forward thrust of the hindquarter to sustain endurance at that speed. With less ground coverage a dog needs to take more steps, with more steps comes more expense of energy and so on.

I suggest that you read up about GSDs and then make your decision as to what pleases you.

I am merely addressing this reply to Leelaa17, so please do not use this as an opportunity start a 600 page thread about the pros and cons of sloping back and "decrepit" hindquarters which have been done to death over the last few years. I am only saying to Leelaa17 that she should research her own breed and then make up her mind about what is right and what is wrong.

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Thanks Scales of Justice. I struggled due to the amount of previous discussion pertaining to back lines, on this and every other GSD forum, worldwide.

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Jose   

Hi.... wasnt sure where to post this but we shall try here!

Just recently lost our 15 year old Border x Kelpie (fair run I know!) to a stroke. Sad day. Our next dog we're looking at a GSD as we had an ex show GSD from a friend as our first family dog and fell in love with them from that day.

Im thinking black and tan, male, medium-ish hair (if possible - I like a bit of fur to rough up but not too much ). Obviously good elbows and hips to hopefully prevent major problems in the future (our previous GSD had hip dysplasia but made it to 16 before it got too much for her).

Just wondering if anyone could recommend any amazing breeders in the Geelong/Melbourne area.

We don't plan on having him for show or breeding, just as a companion as he will come with me pretty much everywhere I go :cry:

Thanks!

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KLS   
When they're puppies, we hold them over our knees with their front legs in one hand and their back legs in the other hand and gently but firmly bend them over our knee to help the roach form. If you do it right, they can't walk, so they're easy to catch, and they always win at the shows :thumbsup:

:) I've heard that works really well???!!! Must try it on Bolt... ;)

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'kezziahgsd' date='11th Feb 2010 - 06:00 PM' post='4324547'

Never did I say it was wrong to own a dog that didn't conform to the standard! The original poster was apparantly amazed that people could own or import dogs of American origin and clearly (in his/her opinion) not adhering to the standard, yet could own a dog themselves that is unable to be shown here due to its coat fault. Again, each to their

own.

You have just reiterated that you do consider someone that owns a dog with a fault to be not qualified to comment on the breed overall.

Not really sure how you work that out. I don't recall questioning her right to an opinion or comment, just the hint of double standard in her original comment

I don't understand either why anyone would go to the expense and difficulty of importing an American showline of extreme angulation that is unlikely to be popular for any worthwhile purpose. I can't see American lines winning at shows or used for a working purpose superior to what we are breeding here. My faulty coated boy wasn't purchased for breeding or showing but neither would I go to the expence and trouble of importing a faulty dog as an ideal exercise.

So, because a dog is imported from America it is faulty? Not every American dog is over angulated, just as not every dog of German origin is perfect! Both have their good points and maybe, just maybe their good points can compliment each other. It gets on my goat when people generalise about 'types', whatever they are, German, American, English, Working, whatever, they will pick out the most extreme example and bag the crap out of the 'type' as a whole. Of course there are extreme examples, you can find them in any breed in any country. Oh and just FYI dogs of American lines can and do win here.

yes but they don't win where it counts.....Nationals for example or under specialist breed judges

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Leelaa17   
Leelaa17,
But it really makes me upset when I see GSD will the sloping back (roached back is the term I have heard - when the back slops down towards the ground and their back legs are stretched out behind them)........... some of the ones I have seen dont seem to walk or run properly - and I know that the show people prefer this and they wouldnt take on my boy or girl because their backs are so straight and dont slope at all...

but it isnt normal for their backs to do that and me particular vet said it isnt good for them when they get older...

is it wrong of me to hate the look of it?? It just upsets me - I feel that making their backs do that is in the same class as docking tails and clipping ears?......

what i also want to know is WHY they do it???

Have you noticed that a GSD is stood differently in the rear to other breeds? When you bring a GSDs legs 4 square (as the other breeds are stood) the slope becomes less obvious.

You need to inform yourself about the function of the GSD firstly. The GSD is a trotting breed designed to cover the most amount of ground with minimum of effort. You cannot compare the gait of a GSD to the general dog in the street or other breeds which is why most people take exception to the GSD. Many other breeds are designed for different purposes, many are not trotting breeds, many are not working breeds and many do not rely on trotting over large distances.

Many straight stifled breeds are not ground covering in their gait in the same sense that a GSD is and do not have the necessary forward thrust of the hindquarter to sustain endurance at that speed. With less ground coverage a dog needs to take more steps, with more steps comes more expense of energy and so on.

I suggest that you read up about GSDs and then make your decision as to what pleases you.

I am merely addressing this reply to Leelaa17, so please do not use this as an opportunity start a 600 page thread about the pros and cons of sloping back and "decrepit" hindquarters which have been done to death over the last few years. I am only saying to Leelaa17 that she should research her own breed and then make up her mind about what is right and what is wrong.

Thank you Scales of Justice - I reaslly appreciate the info you gave me! :rofl:

and you actually answered a question I have been asking myself for almost 2 years now.........

why does my male GSD not run? LOL

I always used to say to people 'yeah he doesnt actually run, he just trots'... cant believe that they are actually a trotting breed - explains A LOT. lol

Max doesnt run... I have seen him full blown run maybe twice in his life?... he just trots everywhere - quite cute. :D

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'kezziahgsd' date='11th Feb 2010 - 06:00 PM' post='4324547'

Never did I say it was wrong to own a dog that didn't conform to the standard! The original poster was apparantly amazed that people could own or import dogs of American origin and clearly (in his/her opinion) not adhering to the standard, yet could own a dog themselves that is unable to be shown here due to its coat fault. Again, each to their

own.

You have just reiterated that you do consider someone that owns a dog with a fault to be not qualified to comment on the breed overall.

Not really sure how you work that out. I don't recall questioning her right to an opinion or comment, just the hint of double standard in her original comment

I don't understand either why anyone would go to the expense and difficulty of importing an American showline of extreme angulation that is unlikely to be popular for any worthwhile purpose. I can't see American lines winning at shows or used for a working purpose superior to what we are breeding here. My faulty coated boy wasn't purchased for breeding or showing but neither would I go to the expence and trouble of importing a faulty dog as an ideal exercise.

So, because a dog is imported from America it is faulty? Not every American dog is over angulated, just as not every dog of German origin is perfect! Both have their good points and maybe, just maybe their good points can compliment each other. It gets on my goat when people generalise about 'types', whatever they are, German, American, English, Working, whatever, they will pick out the most extreme example and bag the crap out of the 'type' as a whole. Of course there are extreme examples, you can find them in any breed in any country. Oh and just FYI dogs of American lines can and do win here.

yes but they don't win where it counts.....Nationals for example or under specialist breed judges

Where it counts for us is in the All Breeds ring. Our choice, no disrespect to those who chose to exhibit in the Speciality ring. We don't and have never thrown stones at the 'speciality' type and would appreciate the same consideration.

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SwaY   
yes but they don't win where it counts.....Nationals for example or under specialist breed judges

I don't have GSD's nor know anything about them, but seriously - but they don't win where it counts

Where it counts to whom? You, me or a person who has a pet.

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Flaves   
[quote name='kezziahgsd' post='4373202'

yes but they don't win where it counts.....Nationals for example or under specialist breed judges

Where it counts for us is in the All Breeds ring. Our choice, no disrespect to those who chose to exhibit in the Speciality ring. We don't and have never thrown stones at the 'speciality' type and would appreciate the same consideration.

PP - each to their own really on how and what ring people show in.

It counts for you it seems in the specialty ring as it does me, and it counts for Kezziah in the all breeds ring, there is nothing wrong with that :)

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hey guys

i just have a quick qustion, i have a a 13month old german shepherd, i just want too know what is a good dog biscuit too feed her, my vet told me too feed her royal canin, so thats what i have been giving her.... is there any others out there that are way better and australia made???

thanks for the help

matthew

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Flaves   

hey guys

i just have a quick qustion, i have a a 13month old german shepherd, i just want too know what is a good dog biscuit too feed her, my vet told me too feed her royal canin, so thats what i have been giving her.... is there any others out there that are way better and australia made???

thanks for the help

matthew

What does/did your breeder suggest?

That would be my first port of call :)

Other wise there are a few foods that i know people use and their dogs do well:

Artemis

Royal canin

Blackhawk Holistic

Advance

Eukanuba

You need to find one that works for your dog

RC is good because it has age specific foods, however often Vets suggest a food that they sell :)

So do your homework and speak to your breeder

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