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Troy

Bloodhound

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Troy   

The Bloodhound

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=108 )

Group: Group 4 (Hounds)

General Appearance: Noble and dignified expression, characterised by solemnity, wisdom and power.

Characteristics: Possesses in a most marked degree every point and characteristic of those dogs which hunt together by scent (Sagaces). Very powerful, standing over more ground than is usual with hounds of other breeds. Skin relatively loose.

Temperament: Affectionate, neither quarrelsome with companions nor with other dogs. Somewhat reserved and sensitive.

Head And Skull: Head narrow in proportion to length and long in proportion to body, tapering slightly from temples to muzzle, thus when viewed from above and in front having an appearance of being flattened at sides and of being nearly equal in width throughout entire length. In profile upper outline of skull is nearly in same plane as that of foreface. Length from end of nose to stop not less than that from that from stop to back of occipital protuberance. Entire length of head from posterior part of occipital protuberance to end of muzzle 30cms (12 ins) or more in dogs and 28cms (11 ins) or more in bitches. Skull is long and narrow, with occipital peak pronounced. Foreface long, deep and of even width throughout, with square outlines when seen in profile. Head furnished with only a small amount of loose skin. Nostrils large and open. In front, lips falling squarely making a right angle with upper line of foreface.

Eyes: Medium size, dark brown or hazel, neither sunken nor prominent, the lids being oval in shape and meeting the cornea (front window of the eye) perfectly without any irregularity in their contour. Eyes should be free from any interference from the eyelashes. Signs of any obvious eye irritation must be heavily penalised.

Ears: Thin and soft to the touch, long, set on low and falling in graceful folds, lower parts curling inwards and backwards.

Mouth: Jaws strong with a perfect, regular and complete scissor bite, i.e. Upper teeth closely overlapping lower teeth and set square to the jaws.

Neck: Long.

Forequarters: Shoulders muscular and well sloped. Forelegs straight, large, round in bone with elbows well set in. Pasterns strong.

Body: Ribs well sprung, chest well let down between forelegs forming a deep keel. Back and loins strong, the latter deep and slightly arched.

Hindquarters: Thighs and second thighs very muscular. Hocks well let down, bent and squarely set.

Feet: Strong and well knuckled up.

Tail: (Stern) Long, thick, tapering to a point, set high with moderate amount of hair underneath. Carried scimitar fashion, but not curled over back or corkscrew any time. When moving carried high.

Gait/Movement: Elastic, swinging free.

Coat: Smooth, short and weatherproof.

Colour: Black and tan, liver and tan (red and tan) and red. Darker colours sometimes interspersed with lighter or badger coloured hair and sometimes flecked with white. Small amount of white permissible on chest, feet and tip of tail.

Sizes: Height:

Adult dogs 66 cms (26 ins)

Adult bitches 61 cms (24 ins)

Dogs usually vary from 63-69 cms (25-27 ins)

Bitches usually vary from 58-63 cms (23-25 ins)

Mean average weight: Adult Dogs 41 kgs (90 lbs) in fair condition.

Mean average weight: Adult Bitches 36 kgs (80 lbs) in fair condition

Dogs attain the weight of 50 kgs (110 lbs)

Bitches attain the weight of 45.5 kgs (100 lbs)

Hounds of the maximum height and weight preferred, providing that quality, proportion and balance combine.

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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Where's Cenititout? I have so many questions.

1. I bet Bloodhound people are sick of this one.. just how slobbery are they?

2. How would you rate their suitability as pets? What sort of owner makes a good Bloodhound owner?

Edited by poodlefan

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Where's Cenititout? I have so many questions.

1. I bet Bloodhound people are sick of this one.. just how slobbery are they?

2. How would you rate their suitability as pets? What sort of owner makes a good Bloodhound owner?

They can be slobbery,no more so than a neo or dogue though.After a big drink is normally when they get you,or when you are late for work or with good clothes on.Always good on dark pants with a big silver snail trail up your butt !

They are awesome dogs,fantastic family dogs that adore kids-well mine do .They still need to be supervised with small children because of size,but mine grow up with cats,chi's chickens running around etc.

They do need lots of training,basic obedience etc and socialisation from 8 weeks is crucial.

Some are more high drive than others,which is why it is important to let the breeder guide you to pups with a suitable presonality.Good owners are ones who will listen to their breeder :)

They need to be aware of the unique bloodhound temperament,feeding requirements and excersise.

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They need to be aware of the unique bloodhound temperament,feeding requirements and excersise.

Could you tell us more about these please?

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They need to be aware of the unique bloodhound temperament,feeding requirements and excersise.

Could you tell us more about these please?

Bloodhounds are a scent hound,so sniffing is what they do-which some people can handle when on a walk,some hate it.It can make some males hard to handle when showing or trailing.They love to sniff bum cracks and other unsavoury areas,as that is the area of the most scent-to put it delicately :) It is a fanatastic mother in law deterrent.

Most people think they are stubborn,they can be wilful-if they smell something good that way,and you are going the other,a battle of wills will sometimes ensure.They are bred to follow a trail and this is what they will do if they get out of your yard,so you need to be aware of the fact that they are not like the beverly hillbillies dog,they will go, they wont lay around on the porch all day,and a hound can cover 20 km easily.So secure fencing ( i use electric fencing) is a must.

They are a big dog,males especially need firm,consistent handling as they can become a little dominant with weak leadership.These behaviours include,attention seeking,jumping or launching at you,barging etc,cute at 8 weeks,not so cute at 60 kg+

Positive training does work well,you still need to be firm though,no cuddles or treats for jumping up and knocking you flat,I have had to retrain a few that were "trained" in an inappropriate way ie just ignore bad behaviour and hope it grows out of it-doesnt work. And despite the images you see on t.v,where there are owners dragged at the end of a lead,bloodhounds are not hard to lead train on a loose lead.

Iused to walk 4 adults at a time-200+kg and all walked nicely,even taught them to "wheel" on command to change direction without tangling me up.

Swimming them is different though-never take 2 at a time (on leads) unless you want gadget arms.

Socialisation-IS CRITICAL and needs to be done at 8 weeks +,just not high dog traffic areas for health reasons.Have seen too many nervy dogs simply because owners wont take them out of the yard until they are 16 weeks +.

They need to go everywhere and be introduced to lots of things and people-100 people in 100 days is a good guide.

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Is there much difference in size between males and females?

Yes,well in my ones anyway!

Bono in lean condition when he was pts was 65kg ,71 cm at shoulder

Demon normally weighed around 55 kg ,68 cm at shoulder

Millie 48 kgs 2 mths ago

Leila 45 kgs 2 mths ago.

Clinton,one of the hand raised pups 65-68 kgs and 72 cm at shoulder

Radar (same litter) 72 cm and 70 kg.

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Beauie   

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I was a breeder/exhibitor for 19 years.

We lost our last Bloodhound 12 months ago at the age of 9 + years old.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

Best to have a read here. http://www.bloodhoundclub.co.uk/history/

3. How common is it in Australia?

[/b]Sadly the breed seems even rarer than it was 19 years ago when I first began.

There are very few breeders nowadays here in Oz and bloodlines had been very closely related in the past.

The few select breeders around today, although are spread far & wide throughout the country, are doing their best in importing fresh blood by importing dogs or frozen semen.

These breeders are still actively involved in conformation showing. [/b]

4. What is the average lifespan?

As per most giant breeds, the average life span is said to be between 8-10 years however as with other giant breeds, things like cancer & bloat can take young dogs.

I am pleased to mention that I have had one male live past 12 years old but sadly it is still never long enough.

The average I have had in the past has been 8 1/2 to 11 years old

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

A Bloodhound should be a very energetic, happy-go-lucky hound.

They can at times be aloof with strangers but on the whole, have outgoing, friendly temperaments.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Adults do require a lot of excercise. They are not like Duke in the Beverly Hillbillies, in fact, you would only see a Bloodhound sleeping on the porch once he/she has run themselves ragged.

They are on the go a lot of the day.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Yes & no...as a past breeder, I would always welcome & recommend people come & meet our hounds to see if they could cope with such an outgoing dog.

Many of the past enquiries wanted a "Duke" but I would rather put people off purchasing a puppy than have the poor puppy need to come back to me a few weeks later due to the new owners unable to cope.

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Ha ha ha....watch out..Bloodhounds can become bored in a very short period of time & if left alone in the backyard while the owners are at work all day, may come home to find the washing pulled off the line & dragged all over the yard, a couple of 6 foot holes to China, all the plants chewed to confetti & a neighbour who may wish to strangle you due to the constant baying ( Bloodhounds bay, they do not really bark as such).

I always recommend company, whether it be another Bloodhound, another breed or someone at home for at least some of the day

9. How much grooming is required?

Not an awful lot. A good brush once a week is fine although, when spring or early summer arrives, Bloodhounds do shed some coat & a good rake brush can eliminate most of this.

Ears are the main things to keep watch on as with any breeds with the low set ears.

Due to limited air circulating within the canal, canker can build up & ear infections can take hold.

A wipe out with a good ear cleaner once a week or when needed, is recommended.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

Yes, the Bloodhound can be boisterous, so basic early trainingis a MUST !!!

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Breeders are now hip & elbow scoring their breeding stock & generally I am unaware of any worrisome problems.

Like some breeds with the heavy eye lids, Bloodhounds can have entropian but this is not a life threatening illness & can be fixed with surgery. A vet can diagnose this from an early age.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

A breeder should always offer on going support & advice.

Like buying any dog, have a list of questions in which you would like to know. Read as much about the breed as possible and talk to as many of the breeders as you can.

On a last note: The breed is comical, so a good sense of humour is needed. Their daily antics can make you laugh non stop. They are good companions with other breeds but can be a bit "testy" at dinner time with other dogs around. Bloodhounds LOVE their food, so feeding separately is recommended.

The most important things of all is know your dog & if ever in doubt, ring the breeder or your vet.

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~JoLu~   
3. How common is it in Australia?

Sadly the breed seems even rarer than it was 19 years ago when I first began.

There are very few breeders nowadays here in Oz and bloodlines had been very closely related in the past.

The few select breeders around today, although are spread far & wide throughout the country, are doing their best in importing fresh blood by importing dogs or frozen semen.

These breeders are still actively involved in conformation showing.

Was a little surprised actually at how few Bloodhound breeders there are in Aus, when I first started looking at them. They are a beautiful breed, and it's good to know there is a dedicated group of breeders out there.

Definitely my next breed :bolt:

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Anyone considering purchasing a bloodhound should ask the breeder for hip/elbow scores,if they havent been tested you should get a health guarantee for hips/elbows from that breeder.Same for eyes,and the other thing to ask is about bloat,especially if close relatives have bloated as you will need to be super observant with those dogs.

Temperament is extremely important,so if possible ask to see the parents and it is a good idea to see if the breeder has references from previous puppy buyers.

Also ask about their re homing policy(ie will they take back a dog they have bred at any stage in the dogs life) and make sure they are there for you with any training /health problems-you buy one of my dogs,you get me too :bolt:

Health problems in Bloodhounds

Elbow dysplasia (FCP,UAP ,OCD)

Hip dysplasia(not common even though they do have a high average hip score)

Hyperthyroidism

Entropian/Ectropian

Prolapsed third eyelid

Bloat (GDV)

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Where's Cenititout? I have so many questions.

1. I bet Bloodhound people are sick of this one.. just how slobbery are they?

2. How would you rate their suitability as pets? What sort of owner makes a good Bloodhound owner?

some drool!

post-7731-1253877069_thumb.jpg

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Baylord   

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

I have owned bloodhounds since the mid 70’s, but it wasn’t until 1989 that I started to show and breed them.

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

One of the oldest hounds, with ancestry, that possibly dates back to the eighth century.

It is thought that the breed originated in the Belgium area

Bloodhounds have also been known as Limier, Lyme-ho and Lymer because they were led on line (lyam) when nearing the quarry. They were called Sleuth or Slot hounds meaning tracking hounds.

The breed is thought to have been used originally for hunting, and locating wounded game. It was realised that they were able to discriminate peoples scent and were used to trail poachers, criminals and runaways.

For a more thorough detailed history you should read Mac Barwick’s History of the Bloodhound which is located on the http://www.bloodhoundclub.co.uk/

3. How common is it in Australia?

The breed is not a common breed within Australia, more so in Western Australia.

Since I have been showing in conformation classes, there has only been one other dog that we used to compete against back in the late 80s.

This creates a challenge when breeding, hence we have imported dogs and semen from the UK, NZ and the USA, a number of times, in fact we are about to hopefully incorporate a new bloodline sometime within the next two months.

4. What is the average lifespan?

I have read a few variances on this, some say between 6 – 8 years, and others 8 – 10 years., and yet my own are passing from 9 – 13 years, with the majority passing at around 11 years of age.

5. What is the general temperament/personality? The standard states he is extremely affectionate neither quarrelsome with companions nor with other dogs. His nature is somewhat shy and equally sensitive to kindness or correction. though what it does not state that like any breed, there has been known to have some aggressive hounds as well, a lot of which could be man made, by incorrect rearing/discipline or should I say lack of discipline.

They can be an extremely dominant breed, head strong, wilful, independent, features which causes the “experts” to say they are not intelligent. Nothing could be further from the truth. It is these features, that enables them to be the Rolls Royce of Man Trailers. However if the Blood hound is brought up correctly, well socialised, and disciplined you couldn’t have a more loyal loving companion who can be a real clown.

It has always been said that you don’t tell a bloodhound to do something, you ask him.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult? It all depends upon their environment. If they live in a large area with other dogs they can race around and entertain themselves. If however they are in a normal house yard they should be walked once or twice a day.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

As long as the potential new owner has been fully advised of all the facts concerning this breed.

They are most definitely not a dog for everyone, what with their drool, having to be either on a leash or in an enclosed area all the time due to their nose taking over and them wanting to investigate it. If you have a loose Bloodhound it will surely end up a dead Bloodhound.

I always advise my people that this is a dog, not a child, treat it accordingly, set rules from the very beginning and stick to them.

A Bloodhound is like that of a naughty petulant child, and like a child, you never give them an inch or else they will beguile you with their looks and take you for a mile!

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

You could be asking for problems as they can be very mischievous, but, I also know of a lot who are quite capable of staying home alone without creating any problems. Again it comes down to how they are brought up. The more you put into them as a youngster the more you will get back in return.

9. How much grooming is required?

They are what I call a wash and wear breed, though daily checking/maintenance of their eyes and ears is recommended.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)? They can be, one sweep of their tail could send a toddler flying, and being a very strong animal they could be a bit too much for the elderly or infirm, but in saying that, once again it depends on how they are reared. We have a number of hounds that live with families of all ages, as well as children with special needs, without any problems.

Though I always recommend that they be fed separately, and away from children as they love their food.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

Common Medical Conditions Found in Bloodhounds

By Dr. John Hamil, DVM USA

CALCINOSIS CIRCUMSCRIPTA (C.CUTIS)

HYPOTHYROIDISM

EPILEPSY

LYMPHOSARCOMA (LYMPHOMA)

HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY

ANESTHESIA

ENTROPION

ECTROPION

KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS SICCA (KCS, DRY EYE)

CATARACTS

INTESSUSCEPTION

BLOAT (GASTRIC DILATATION VOLVULUS SYNDROME)

UNUNITED ANCONEAL PROCESS (ELBOW DYSPLASIA)

OSTEOCHONDROSIS DISSECANS (OCD)

CERVIAL SPONDYLOPATHY (WOBBLER, CERVIAL INSTABILITY, SPONDYLOLITHESIS)

LUMBRAOSACRAL INSTABILITY (LUMBROSACRAL SPONDYLOPATHY)

HIP DYSPLASIA

It seems like a lot, but we have only actually endured a very small number of these problems.

One thing which should be mentioned, but it is not an inherited disease, is the breed is well known for eating foreign objects, which can cause bowel obstruction.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

The buyer should ask as many questions as possible. If location permits, ask to see the parents. Any queries I have from people in Perth we always invite them to come and visit all our hounds. Ask to view the paperwork on the hip and elbow scoring, and what it all means. With each pup we issue a comprehensive health check list that is completed by our vet.

Breeder support, whether it be for advice or the need to rehome (which hardly ever happens) is only a phone call or email away, in fact I get quite a number of calls from various bloodhound owners (and the majority is not from my own puppy people) I suppose because I have been involved with the breed for so long.

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Ons   

:):provoke::laugh:

I didn't realise they were so big though, just always thought they were "a next size up" from beagles for some strange reason :cool:

they truly are outstanding dogs though.

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