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myValkyrie

Terrier Terror: List Reveals Jack Russell Attacks

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http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/01/25/2800176.htm

The Jack Russell terrier could be fast becoming one of New South Wales' most dangerous dogs, according to the latest dog attack register.

The state's government has released its quarterly dog attack report for the period between October and December last year.

In all, 793 attacks were reported to councils throughout NSW, down slightly from the previous quarter.

Topping the list of 20 breeds that bite was the Staffordshire bull terrier, followed by the Australian cattle dog and the German shepherd.

The Minister for Local Government Barbara Perry says it is unusual to see the Jack Russell come in at number seven.

"It is surprising that we see little dogs like the Jack Russell," she said.

"I do remember in the last quarter we saw the Maltese making it to the top 20 dogs on the dog attack register.

"I think that it brings home the message that the fact that popular breeds are involved in attacks still means that dog owners have got to keep their pets under control at all times.

"Any dog is capable of attack and sometimes we just don't know why they might attack.

"But the best reminder here is that dogs need to be properly supervised and controlled when out in the public."

Gosford had the highest number of dog attacks, followed by Blacktown and the Shoalhaven.

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Cosmolo   

We don't know why they might attack.. Really? I can think of a few reasons

Dog not socialised- Owner did not socialise

Dog not trained- Owner did not train

Dog not properly contained- Owner did not contain

Dog not supervised with strangers and strange children- Owner did not supervise

Of course we have no clue about why dogs attack..

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JRT's, like a lot of terriers, were bred to attack vermin. Some of them are brave little idiots in the attack department, sometimes with bad results. I will never forget talking with someone who ended out with a JRT through changing partners, and ending out flabbergasted when the little, presumed harmless, dog killed a sheep.

In my experience in boarding kennels, JRT temperament is highly variable. Some are pretty placid. Some think they are BIG dogs and will take on a Rotti that weighs 10 times as much as them . . . and are happy as Larry being part of a pack of 30+ kg dogs with unaggressive temperaments. They do tend to be VERY opinionated dogs . . . whatever temperament they have, they seem to have it in a big way.

Edited by sandgrubber

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We don't know why they might attack.. Really? I can think of a few reasons

Dog not socialised- Owner did not socialise

Dog not trained- Owner did not train

Dog not properly contained- Owner did not contain

Dog not supervised with strangers and strange children- Owner did not supervise

Of course we have no clue about why dogs attack..

So Cosmolo you wouldn't be saying, in a very subtle way, that the owner may have something to do with it?

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We don't know why they might attack.. Really? I can think of a few reasons

Dog not socialised- Owner did not socialise

Dog not trained- Owner did not train

Dog not properly contained- Owner did not contain

Dog not supervised with strangers and strange children- Owner did not supervise

Of course we have no clue about why dogs attack..

So Cosmolo you wouldn't be saying, in a very subtle way, that the owner may have something to do with it?

Dear oh dear .... it's NEVER the owner's fault ...... don't you know that it ALWAYS the dog's fault!!! :)

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I often wonder about the usefulness of such "lists".

I'm not a statistician, but surely there are a number of variables that need to be taken into account when stating that a particular breed of dog is "fast becoming one of New South Wales most dangerous dogs" and other such ludicrous claims, or that more dog attacks happen in one council area than another. You can't come to such conclusions from just a register of incidents which are (probably - I may of course be wrong here) no more than vaguely described and are not put into any meaningful context.

One factor I'd hope would be taken into account is percentages of each breed listed within the overall dog population. The Staffy is a pretty popular breed, as is the JRT I would say (not exactly impartial myself re the latter). If there are more of them, then yes, they may represent a higher percentage of dogs involved in incidents.

Another is the population of dogs in any given area - in relation to which council areas have the highest recorded occurrences. Blacktown City is a very large council.

And what exactly are they including as "attacks"? Is it actual serious aggressive attacks, or does it include the nipping and biting from an overexcitable mouthy young dog - which can sometimes cause damage, and may be mistaken for aggression, but is more about inadequate training and/or management, whatever the breed.

Anyway, just a bit of a mid-week rant...

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I often wonder about the usefulness of such "lists".

I'm not a statistician, but surely there are a number of variables that need to be taken into account when stating that a particular breed of dog is "fast becoming one of New South Wales most dangerous dogs" and other such ludicrous claims, or that more dog attacks happen in one council area than another. You can't come to such conclusions from just a register of incidents which are (probably - I may of course be wrong here) no more than vaguely described and are not put into any meaningful context.

One factor I'd hope would be taken into account is percentages of each breed listed within the overall dog population. The Staffy is a pretty popular breed, as is the JRT I would say (not exactly impartial myself re the latter). If there are more of them, then yes, they may represent a higher percentage of dogs involved in incidents.

Another is the population of dogs in any given area - in relation to which council areas have the highest recorded occurrences. Blacktown City is a very large council.

And what exactly are they including as "attacks"? Is it actual serious aggressive attacks, or does it include the nipping and biting from an overexcitable mouthy young dog - which can sometimes cause damage, and may be mistaken for aggression, but is more about inadequate training and/or management, whatever the breed.

Anyway, just a bit of a mid-week rant...

I have similar concerns and thoughts.

I think it is wrong to "brand" a breed in this way.

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pie   

There's also the problem that anything small and white with tan or black is labeled a JRT.

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asal   

our neighbour has two, I still cant belive how smart they are.

one in particular is amazing

ive never before seen a dog that not only fetches his ball, but throws it himself :(

this guy can keep himself entertained all day.

not to mention his 80 + human.

anything she needs, n askes him for it, if he can move it he fetches it. n his brother helps

priceless

Edited by asal

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tarope   

Topping the list of 20 breeds that bite was the Staffordshire bull terrier, followed by the Australian cattle dog and the German shepherd.

So only 20 breeds that bite, that's handy to know :( stupid ABC and pollies. :(:)

The Minister for Local Government Barbara Perry says it is unusual to see the Jack Russell come in at number seven.

"It is surprising that we see little dogs like the Jack Russell," she said.

"I do remember in the last quarter we saw the Maltese making it to the top 20 dogs on the dog attack register.

I doubt Barbara Perry knows what a Jack Russell or Maltese even looks like. :thumbsup: I wonder if Babs gives a prize for coming first on the list. :cry::mad

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mish13   

I think any breed has the potential to bite under a lot of varied scenarios, all I can say is our Jack Russell doenst have a mean bone in his body.

This is skipper as a baby and now, he has just turned six

Animals165.jpgAnimals191.jpgAnimals201.jpgFamily091.jpgAnimals410.jpgAnimals270.jpgAssorted358-1.jpg

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poochmad   

As with any breed of dog - in the wrong hands, they can be dangerous. I think a lot of people get little dogs like JRTs thinking they are 'easy', when in reality they are a big dog in a little body. All that energy has to go somewhere...

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pie   

I also wanted to add as a side note that every single JRT I have met that was from a registered breeder was awesome, I've met about 8 now, owned by neighbours, and people at training, and they are all fantastic, friendly and I saw no aggression at all. I never liked them until I met these ones.

I think the BYB / pet shops etc have a lot to answer for regarding the bad reputation of the JRT.

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mish13   
Oh and Mish13 - just want to say - Skipper is adorable! :o

Thanks Poochmad he thinks he is too :hug: :hug:

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I think any breed has the potential to bite under a lot of varied scenarios,
As with any breed of dog - in the wrong hands, they can be dangerous. I think a lot of people get little dogs like JRTs thinking they are 'easy', when in reality they are a big dog in a little body. All that energy has to go somewhere...

True and so true. I think a lot of JRTs and JRTXs are bought at pet shops and other less than reputable sellers by people who have little or no idea what they're letting themselves in for.

Gorgeous pics mish13!

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Erny   
"It is surprising that we see little dogs like the Jack Russell," she said. ... we just don't know why they might attack.

Well, if they'd only look at the other end of the leash (as we keep asking/suggesting/telling them to) they might just get a clue. :eek:

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gillybob   

Sandgrubber, opinunated is a good discription of my JRT.

She certainly has an opinion about everything and tells me so.

edited to add.

When she went out rodent hunting, she spent the entire time either asleep or exploring.

Edited by gillybob

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