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Troy

Pomeranian

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Troy   

The Pomeranian

ANKC Standard

(from http://www.ankc.org.au/home/breeds_details.asp?bid=40 )

Group: Group 1 (Toys)

General Appearance: Compact, short coupled dog, well knit in frame. Exhibiting great intelligence in expression; activity and buoyancy in deportment.

Characteristics: Sound, vivacious and dainty.

Temperament: Extrovert, lively and intelligent.

Head And Skull: Head and nose foxy in outline, skull slightly flat, large in proportion to muzzle which finishes finely and free from lippiness. Nose black in white, orange and shaded sable dogs; brown in chocolate tipped sable dogs, but in others colours may be 'self-coloured', never parti-coloured or flesh.

Eyes: Medium size, slightly oval, not full, or set too wide apart; bright, dark and showing great intelligence. In white, orange, shaded sable and cream dogs, rims black.

Ears: Relatively small, not set too wide apart, not too low down, but carried perfectly erect.

Mouth: Jaws strong, with a perfect, regular and compete scissor bite, i.e. the upper teeth closely overlapping the lower teeth and set square to the jaws.

Neck: Rather short and well set into shoulders.

Forequarters: Shoulders clean and well laid back. Fine boned legs, perfectly straight, of medium length in due proportion to size of dog.

Body: Back short, body compact, well ribbed up, barrel well rounded. Chest fairly deep, not too wide but in proportion to size of dog.

Hindquarters: Fine boned, legs neither cow-hocked nor wide behind; medium angulation.

Feet: Small, compact and cat-like.

Tail: Characteristic of breed, high set, turned over back and carried flat and straight, profusely covered with long, harsh, spreading hair.

Gait/Movement: Free moving, brisk and buoyant.

Coat: Two coats, an under coat and an outer coat. Former soft, fluffy, the latter long, perfectly straight, harsh in texture and covering whole of body; very abundant round neck and fore part of shoulders and chest; forming frill, extending over shoulders. Forequarters well feathered, thighs and hindlegs well feathered to hocks.

Colour: All colours permissible, but free from black or white shadings. Whole colours are: white, black, brown, light or dark, blue as pale as possible. Orange which should be self-coloured and bright as possible, Beaver. Cream dogs have black noses and black eye rims. Whites must be quite free from lemon or any other colour. A few white hairs in any of the self-coloured dogs permissible but undesirable. Dogs (other than white) with white or tan markings highly undesirable and not considered whole coloured specimens. In parti-coloured dogs, colours evenly distributed on body in patches; a dog with white or tan feet or chest not a parti-coloured dog. Shaded sables should be shaded throughout with three or more colours, the hair to be as uniformly shaded as possible, and with no patches of self-colour. In mixed classes, where whole coloured and parti-coloured Pomeranians compete together, the preference should, if in all other points they are equal, be given to the whole coloured specimens.

Sizes: Ideal weight: Dogs 1.8-2 kg (4-4.5 lbs)

Bitches 2-2.5 kg (4.5-5.5 lbs)

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

Notes: Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

2. Where and why was the breed first developed?

3. How common is it in Australia?

4. What is the average lifespan?

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

9. How much grooming is required?

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

If you wish to contribute to the knowledge about this breed, please answer the above questions. (Copy and paste them into a new post).

  • Please only answer if you breed or own a pedigree example of this breed.
  • You do not have to answer all questions
  • Please keep posts limited to answering questions or for asking further questions if you require more (or expanded) information.

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Guest donatella   
Guest donatella

Noone has done this so i'll give it a go for the smallest of the fluff balls.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

First time owner of 2 Poms but long time luster of the breed. I am involved in lots of Pom interest groups so get to see all the showers and their dogs and talk with breeders weekly to keep myself up to date with the breed and the goings on inside the Pom world

3. How common is it in Australia?

I'm going to take a guess here and say they are pretty common however their are more BYB Poms then Reg Breeders so unfortunately there aren't as many fine examples walking the streets as Poms bred to standards. When people see a real sized Pomeranian they are often very shocked at just how small they really are (this is a standard sized Pom). I'd say they are common because they make great house pets for small dog lovers and are cute as a button!

4. What is the average lifespan?

12-14 years but I know a breeder who had one live up to 21 years! and the son of that oldy is currently 18 years, something good running in those genes!

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Fun fun fun! They are little pocket rockets and don't think for a second they are just lap dogs. They are happy to roll in the mud, go fetch sticks in the water but first and foremost be with their human. They are very loyal and make great guard dogs as noone will get within metres of your front door without a warning bark. They are highly intelligent and thrive off being taught tricks and obedience and pick it up very quickly. They are a not a breed to get and leave outside as they don't tolerate not being part of the family.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Climate pending barely anything, even 30mins playtime would be enough even though they could go for longer. You have to bare in mind they have a full coat so no walking in the heat of the day in summer, save exercise times for early morning/night or stimulation at home.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Very easily

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Poms are happy being only dogs if trained from day one although if you work full time and then go out after work every night and all weekend then perhaps a Pom is not right for you. They are happy to relax at home while you work, but they are not a dog to leave at home alone their entire life as they just adore their human companion so much it would be too cruel.

9. How much grooming is required?

Not as much as you would think. A brush a few times per week remembering to brush backwards (towards the head). You will catch most of the stray hairs in the brush and rarely see any hair on your furniture or clothes unless they are in a serious coat drop. Their coat falls in place naturally so they don't need to be clipped, mainly a hygiene clip around the bottom and of course their nails. You don't need to cut the coat unless you want to do a summer trim back or you have a show dog and of course they clip around the head to form a perfect circular shape.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

I'm not a huge fan of Poms and small children. I know of numerous Poms that have had broken legs from being dropped by small children accidentally so I believe it would be extra work for parents to get a breed such as a Pom with small children as you would need to monitor their interaction 24/7. An adult trained Pom would make a great companion for an elderly person.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

In general Poms are pretty sturdy guys but like a lot of small breeds have the risk of luxating patella. Black skin disease is also a risk with Poms but buying through a reputable breeder should eliminate this risk.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Definitely ask about Black skin disease and their lines (if you google BSD you will see how horrific it is). Ask to see pics of the parents of course. Buying through a show breeder will help you get a Pom that's as close to the breed standard as can be as show breeders aim to better their lines in quality and confirmation whereas non showers often just breed to make babies.

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Hi Does anyone know of anyone that is a teacup Pomeranian breeder? My partner and I are looking at getting one at the end of the year when we have our own home. I thought it would be a great idea to start looking around now.

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Hi Nicole, welcome to Dogz Online! You're on the best site to ask about ethical breeders of Pomeranians, but this thread doesn't get a lot of action. I'd suggest popping into the Pomeranian thread in the breed sub forum, which you'll find in the general forum. :)

Please be aware that "Teacup" Pomeranians don't exist as a type. If someone claims to breed a teacup anything, you need to run for the hills and don't look back. Dogs specifically bred to be under the breed standard for size have a myriad of health problems and live much shorter lives. For example, they frequently have hypoglycemia due tiny stomachs, exercise intolerance due to undeveloped hearts and lungs, seizures from brain malformation, broken bones from poor bone density. It's a recipe for heartache, huge veterinary bills, and it's just no life for a dog. :(

http://www.dogster.com/lifestyle/teacup-dogs-small-dog-breeds-health-ethics-puppies-pictures-photos

http://www.almostheavenbiewers.com/teacuprisk.html

Again, pop into the Pomeranian thread in the breed sub forum and I'm sure those with better knowledge of the breed can help you out with how to select an ethical, registered breeder and any other questions you might have. :)

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Jess88   
On 11/12/2012 at 12:52 PM, Guest donatella said:

Noone has done this so i'll give it a go for the smallest of the fluff balls.

QUESTIONS

1. What is my relationship with the breed? (ie breeder, first time owner etc)

First time owner of 2 Poms but long time luster of the breed. I am involved in lots of Pom interest groups so get to see all the showers and their dogs and talk with breeders weekly to keep myself up to date with the breed and the goings on inside the Pom world

3. How common is it in Australia?

I'm going to take a guess here and say they are pretty common however their are more BYB Poms then Reg Breeders so unfortunately there aren't as many fine examples walking the streets as Poms bred to standards. When people see a real sized Pomeranian they are often very shocked at just how small they really are (this is a standard sized Pom). I'd say they are common because they make great house pets for small dog lovers and are cute as a button!

4. What is the average lifespan?

12-14 years but I know a breeder who had one live up to 21 years! and the son of that oldy is currently 18 years, something good running in those genes!

5. What is the general temperament/personality?

Fun fun fun! They are little pocket rockets and don't think for a second they are just lap dogs. They are happy to roll in the mud, go fetch sticks in the water but first and foremost be with their human. They are very loyal and make great guard dogs as noone will get within metres of your front door without a warning bark. They are highly intelligent and thrive off being taught tricks and obedience and pick it up very quickly. They are a not a breed to get and leave outside as they don't tolerate not being part of the family.

6. How much daily exercise is needed for the average adult?

Climate pending barely anything, even 30mins playtime would be enough even though they could go for longer. You have to bare in mind they have a full coat so no walking in the heat of the day in summer, save exercise times for early morning/night or stimulation at home.

7. Is it a breed that a first time dog owner could easily cope with?

Very easily

8. Can solo dogs of this breed easily occupy themselves for long periods?

Poms are happy being only dogs if trained from day one although if you work full time and then go out after work every night and all weekend then perhaps a Pom is not right for you. They are happy to relax at home while you work, but they are not a dog to leave at home alone their entire life as they just adore their human companion so much it would be too cruel.

9. How much grooming is required?

Not as much as you would think. A brush a few times per week remembering to brush backwards (towards the head). You will catch most of the stray hairs in the brush and rarely see any hair on your furniture or clothes unless they are in a serious coat drop. Their coat falls in place naturally so they don't need to be clipped, mainly a hygiene clip around the bottom and of course their nails. You don't need to cut the coat unless you want to do a summer trim back or you have a show dog and of course they clip around the head to form a perfect circular shape.

10. Is it too boisterous for very small children or for infirm people (unless the dog is well trained)?

I'm not a huge fan of Poms and small children. I know of numerous Poms that have had broken legs from being dropped by small children accidentally so I believe it would be extra work for parents to get a breed such as a Pom with small children as you would need to monitor their interaction 24/7. An adult trained Pom would make a great companion for an elderly person.

11. Are there any common hereditary problems a puppy buyer should be aware of?

In general Poms are pretty sturdy guys but like a lot of small breeds have the risk of luxating patella. Black skin disease is also a risk with Poms but buying through a reputable breeder should eliminate this risk.

12. When buying a puppy, what are the things you should ask of the breeder? (eg what health tests have been done (if applicable) and what is an acceptable result to those tests so the buyer has an idea of what the result should be)

Definitely ask about Black skin disease and their lines (if you google BSD you will see how horrific it is). Ask to see pics of the parents of course. Buying through a show breeder will help you get a Pom that's as close to the breed standard as can be as show breeders aim to better their lines in quality and confirmation whereas non showers often just breed to make babies.

Thank you for taking the time to answer the questions. Was a great read and I learnt something I didn't know about the breed with the BDS disease. I'm apart of the Pomeranian Club of NSW and have attend a few shows to watch the Poms on display. I'm a huge lover of the breed just like you and now that I'm settled into our 5 acre property just on the outskirts of Sydney I'm hoping to find the right breeder to have my first pom puppy. I have own sharpie in the past and have cats but love the Pom breed and hope to have a puppy in 2021.  

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