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The New Puppy We Picked Up...


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yes Souff, but you're preaching to the choir.

Yes indeed, preaching to the choir. This is after all, a forum for purebred dogs issues.

But at the same time there is a message out there that it NOT OK to take on these pups because whilever we suckers take these pups off their hands, the demand is there for the supply to continue.

Leave the givers/sellers to have 6 or 8 half grown crossbred dogs in their backyard, with no market, and they might finally get the message that what they are doing is wrong.

Souff

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I wouldnt let this pup near your other dog for at least a week and you should have taken it straight to the vet the day you got it for a full work over. Diseases have an incubation period and parasites are not always glaringly obvious until the rest of the family has them.

Keep it separate, vet work it and give it a week before introducing it to your other dog. For all you know it could be brewing Parvo which is so prevalent at the moment.

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To stop elephants being killed for their tusks there is a ban on trading ivory. Stop the consumption and you stop the trade.

For every dog taken it encourages the "breeder"

To stop this happening NO dogs should be taken off people like this.

EFS

Edited by Jaxx'sBuddy
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To stop elephants being killed for their tusks there is a ban on trading ivory. Stop the consumption and you stop the trade.

For every dog taken it encourages the "breeder"

To stop this happening NO dogs should be taken off people like this.

EFS

Sorry but a ban on trading ivory keeps elephants alive.

A ban on giving a BYB pup a home will mean its death. I'm not comfortable with that. No 'breeder' is going to keep these pups - they'll be dispatched or impounded to receive the same fate.

I think a slightly longer term strategy would be a better option.

Imagine a world in which desexing your dog meant free council registration - that would be a good start.

Edited by poodlefan
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To stop elephants being killed for their tusks there is a ban on trading ivory. Stop the consumption and you stop the trade.

For every dog taken it encourages the "breeder"

To stop this happening NO dogs should be taken off people like this.

EFS

Sorry but a ban on trading ivory keeps elephants alive.

A ban on giving a BYB pup a home will mean its death. I'm not comfortable with that.

I think a slightly longer term strategy would be a better option.

Imagine a world in which desexing your dog meant free council registration - that would be a good start.

True PF. I don't like that a puppy dies either. I wonder if free registration would work?

Years ago the council used to door knock to check on registered dogs, so I think there are more unregistered dogs around so this might not make any difference.

I do not mean to sound heartless but lots of dogs die every day, what makes these pups any different?

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Leave the givers/sellers to have 6 or 8 half grown crossbred dogs in their backyard, with no market, and they might finally get the message that what they are doing is wrong.

It's not really a 'market' if the dogs are seen as worthless to the 'breeder' and are being given away. The situation above might happen when the 'breeder' is charging money and there is a financial motivater. If, however, it's an oops litter because the 'breeder' couldn't be bothered desexing or taking precautions, then while I understand the idealistic rationale behind the thinking expressed above, the sudden jolt of enlightenment will never happen. If someone is really so incredibly irresponsible that they do not care about the consequences of their actions, the fate and well-being of the lives that they have brought into the world, then they're not going to suddenly wake up to the error of their ways just because they can't get rid of their dogs. If they can't give away the dogs, then they'll dispose of them some other way - and it's not necessarily going to be humane. I doubt that they'd have much compunction about dumping them by the side of the road where there are no cameras or at the pound. If someone really doesn't want a dog and doesn't have the inconvenience of a conscience, then it's it's pretty easy to get rid of a dog.

For many people, rather than throwing up their hands in despair and saying they'll do nothing because there are thousands of them, the problem is too big and they can't possibly make any difference, they probably try to follow the starfish principle and say that they can at least make a difference for one dog or several dogs. Some people help with rescue, some people try to give a home to a dog that would otherwise end up dead, in a bad home, in the pound or straining rescue's already limited resources ...

Edited by koalathebear
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True PF. I don't like that a puppy dies either. I wonder if free registration would work?

Years ago the council used to door knock to check on registered dogs, so I think there are more unregistered dogs around so this might not make any difference.

I do not mean to sound heartless but lots of dogs die every day, what makes these pups any different?

There is no one easy solution to these issues. What's needed is a range of approaches.. some carrot some stick.

Dogs may die every day but each deserves a chance of life if its offered. This pup is one of the lucky ones.

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True PF. I don't like that a puppy dies either. I wonder if free registration would work?

Years ago the council used to door knock to check on registered dogs, so I think there are more unregistered dogs around so this might not make any difference.

I do not mean to sound heartless but lots of dogs die every day, what makes these pups any different?

There is no one easy solution to these issues. What's needed is a range of approaches.. some carrot some stick.

Dogs may die every day but each deserves a chance of life if its offered. This pup is one of the lucky ones.

Yes I agree. I am always interested in how to do things better and this one is a difficult situation to think of a way to stop the practice.

I even have trouble with mandatory desexing because in some cases it isn't good for a dog to be desexed too early yet it is one way to stop indiscriminate whelping.

There are always at least two sides to every story....would be easier for me if I saw things in black and white :)

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congratulations on the new arrival

i think you might be looking at a dog around the 20 kg mark, but i'm no expert

you have one lucky puppy in your lives now, as so many wouldnt have done what you have, i hope everything goes well at the vet.

and as far as the pups breader goes, there is always going to be people out there who dont for one reason or another dont desex their dogs and "accidental" matings will occur. :)

this pup needed a home, and the op was kind enought to open her heart to it, weather it been pure bread or a multi cross.

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..... For many people, rather than throwing up their hands in despair and saying they'll do nothing because there are thousands of them, the problem is too big and they can't possibly make any difference, they probably try to follow the starfish principle and say that they can at least make a difference for one dog or several dogs. Some people help with rescue, some people try to give a home to a dog that would otherwise end up dead, in a bad home, in the pound or straining rescue's already limited resources ...

You are preaching to the choir KoalatheBear. Its all been done for many years now and continues to be done.

End result? I believe the supply of unwanted pups is increasing, not decreasing.

I would be careful using the starfish analogy: in a plague they do a lot of damage.

Souff

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You are preaching to the choir KoalatheBear. Its all been done for many years now and continues to be done.

End result? I believe the supply of unwanted pups is increasing, not decreasing.

I would be careful using the starfish analogy: in a plague they do a lot of damage.

Not preaching Souff - just observing. If I was preaching, I'd be telling people what I think they should be doing. I was merely remarking that you have your way of dealing with a horrible situation and others have a different way of addressing the same situation. People have to act in accordance with their own convictions and I don't think any of us are in a position to posit without doubt that one approach is right and the other is wrong. :( I think we're all in agreement that that it's a very heart-breaking problem ...

Edited by koalathebear
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I even have trouble with mandatory desexing because in some cases it isn't good for a dog to be desexed too early yet it is one way to stop indiscriminate whelping.

There are always at least two sides to every story....would be easier for me if I saw things in black and white :cheer:

Yes, I have some issues with it, particularly with small breeds and particularly in the case of females.

HOWEVER ..... I have come around to the idea of doing the medium and large breed male pups early if they are not going to a breeder.

I am quite OK now with them going to the vets first, then to their new home. No balls.

I now have no problem with that at all. See, Souff is getting into progressive thinking. :cheers:

Would be nice if this giver-of-puppies had done that, ah, but there I go again ..... sigh. Pigs will fly first.

They dont vaccinate or microchip, so wake up Souff, why would they desex the pups before giving them away to a good home ....

Silly Souff! :(

Only reputable breeders (who spend money) do that!

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You are preaching to the choir KoalatheBear. Its all been done for many years now and continues to be done.

End result? I believe the supply of unwanted pups is increasing, not decreasing.

I would be careful using the starfish analogy: in a plague they do a lot of damage.

Not preaching Souff - just observing. If I was preaching, I'd be telling people what I think they should be doing. I was merely remarking that you have your way of dealing with a horrible situation and others have a different way of addressing the same situation. People have to act in accordance with their own convictions and I don't think any of us are in a position to posit without doubt that one approach is right and the other is wrong. :( I think we're all in agreement that that it's a very heart-breaking problem ...

Yes I will remember that next time I see mongrel puppies being given away free, or maybe when I have to pick up the pieces of yet another disaster somewhere.

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Yes I will remember that next time I see mongrel puppies being given away free, or maybe when I have to pick up the pieces of yet another disaster somewhere.

OK. Good luck.

Edited by koalathebear
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Yes I will remember that next time I see mongrel puppies being given away free, or maybe when I have to pick up the pieces of yet another disaster somewhere.

OK. Good luck.

'

No luck needed. No tissues any more either.

You learn to block emotion when you hand over society's problem to the vet. There are no farewells. :(

Too many times, KoalatheBear, too many times.

Souff

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yes Souff, but you're preaching to the choir.

Yes indeed, preaching to the choir. This is after all, a forum for purebred dogs issues.

But at the same time there is a message out there that it NOT OK to take on these pups because whilever we suckers take these pups off their hands, the demand is there for the supply to continue.

Leave the givers/sellers to have 6 or 8 half grown crossbred dogs in their backyard, with no market, and they might finally get the message that what they are doing is wrong.

Souff

So very right Souff, the voice of reason.....

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and a genuine breeder of a purebred animal, bred with greater certainty of genetics and temperament so that people can be confident in getting the "product" as described, finds it that much harder to find owners for their animals.

If only we lived in an ideal world.

I personally know a registered breeder, of a breed that most would consider an "easy breed" to manage and care for. She stipulated at the time of purchase that if ever they had a problem or change of heart to contact her, and she would help in any way, (take the canine back, etc.). She was devastated to find one of her young animals in a pound! Irresponsible owners can be found in all walks of life and socioeconomic status, sadly.

All breeders of canines (domestic) need to be vigilant. Any entire canine can be misused to produce progeny way beyond the original breeders control, or desires.

I wish the OP good luck with their endeavour with raising the pup, and it is great that they come here (DOL) for advice, the pup and OP are the real subject of this thread, not preaching to the converted, although I appreciate it does raise issues. Issues raised do not exclusively apply to the random chaos factor of the non-pedigreed world.

My next dog will be a pedigreed pure-bred for sure, but my research will be extensive, along with my own soul searching.

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