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sterlingsilver

Stem Cell Research

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My Staffy had Stem Cell Therapy on the 21st of December on her elbow.

From my side I have to say I havent seen any great improvement, the big test will be winter when effect of her problem becomes more pronounced but even now her limp is similar to what it was previous to the procedure.

Can I enquire what method you had done? A PM is ok.

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I am sorry to hear that BigDaz.

Don't loose hope yet - it took Kluska about 2 months to repair her joints. Just continue with joint supplement (eg Glyde) and fish oil to help the healing process.

We have now followed the injections with the IV stem cell treatment. Very early days but it looks fab.

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My Staffy had Stem Cell Therapy on the 21st of December on her elbow.

From my side I have to say I havent seen any great improvement, the big test will be winter when effect of her problem becomes more pronounced but even now her limp is similar to what it was previous to the procedure.

Can I enquire what method you had done? A PM is ok.

Sorry, I havent been back for a while. She had donor cells injected into the problem area, I am not sure of the technical details and am not sure of the differences in treatments, but would welcome information as I prepared to give other methods a try.

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I am sorry to hear that BigDaz.

Don't loose hope yet - it took Kluska about 2 months to repair her joints. Just continue with joint supplement (eg Glyde) and fish oil to help the healing process.

We have now followed the injections with the IV stem cell treatment. Very early days but it looks fab.

I use Jointguard and am also looking into fish oil, I have ben trying to find fish oil with vitamine E but cant find any at the moment, I may have to resort to Viramine E tablets.

I have stayed away from her Pentosan injectons as I wanted to get some sort of neutral baseline, but I have her booked in for a Pentosan shot tomorrow.

What is IV Stem Cell treatement, is it something that needs to be done in conjunction with the original stem cell injections or is it a different method and can be done seperately?

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Inevitablue would be best to answer your question about IV.

In the meantime.... IV is an intravenous dose of stem cells rather than intra-articular (injection into the joints).

I decided to repeat the stem cell treatment with IV because:

- I believed that another treatment would give us better results (pretty determined :laugh: )

- I have not found anything better than donor stem cells

- The IV treatment is easy on the dog(drip and no anasthetic)

- There have been good results with dogs that have had the intra-articular treatment and then a follow up with the intravenous (advice from our vet)

Edited by HonBun

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I'm very interested in this as my 7 month old may be having an op on his elbow and I would like him to have stem cell treatment as well

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I had my Lab treated with stem cell therapy in Oct. 2011. He has responded extremely well to the treatment and no longer has any on going meds for joint pain. I went to a vet that takes the fat from your dog and injects the stem cells back into the joints. The vet also IV some stem cells at the same time. My boy had a skin irritation for a couple of years and

it was the first thing that cleared up. Vet said the stem cells would have gone to the affected site and made new skin cells. I noticed a difference in him within a week. I think the cost was quite reasonable as well.

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Interesting outcome abgail.

Kluska has her summer itches and the IV does not seem to have helped. Maybe all available stem cells went into the joints :thumbsup: ?

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Interesting outcome abgail.

Kluska has her summer itches and the IV does not seem to have helped. Maybe all available stem cells went into the joints :thumbsup: ?

Hi HonBun. I think this stem cell stuff is just amazing. I am fascinated by how it works. My vet explained that the stem cells know where the damage is and go to the effected areas and turn into that tissue, muscle, bone etc. Amazing. Did you use your dogs own cells or the donor cells? Maybe this is why? Gives me something to read up on.

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So so interesting as my adult dog has allergies. Immunotherapy has helped immensly but his hair growth cycle has been interrupted so i am quite interested in how it could help him.

My vet was explaining the procedure my pup may need and they remove a sectiom of the ulna and inject fat cells into that area im assuming thats stem cell treatment???

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Did you use your dogs own cells or the donor cells? Maybe this is why?

We had donor stem cells.

Donor stem cells come from young dogs, I was a bit more confident about concentration of stem cells in her treatment and there was no need for harvesting cells from her fat.

IMHO it was a better option for Kluska.

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My vet was explaining the procedure my pup may need and they remove a sectiom of the ulna and inject fat cells into that area im assuming thats stem cell treatment???

I am not sure :confused:

I think if they are using host stem cells there is quite a bit of laboratory work to extract stem cells from fat.

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My vet was explaining the procedure my pup may need and they remove a sectiom of the ulna and inject fat cells into that area im assuming thats stem cell treatment???

I am not sure :confused:

I think if they are using host stem cells there is quite a bit of laboratory work to extract stem cells from fat.

From what i understood it would be his own fat. Will chat to the surgeon today as we havean appointment

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Atopic dermatitis is one of the trials. The stem cells appear to interact with the T cell receptors and somehow calm down the over active immune system skin responses. How long they do this for is one question to be answered.

It's a great side effect! Some other anecdotal information has been elderly dogs seeing and/or hearing better.

DCM in large breeds and CHF are also being looked at. The stem cells in humans are improving the effraction rate by repairing weakened valves.

I see that they are pushing forward with growing cow muscle, but I would say it will be decades before anyone is eating stem cell hamburgers. That would be weird!!

Mason Gibbs- talk to your vet, as there are options. You don't have to cut the dog open anymore to collect fat. The cultured cells are cheaper too, because of the reduced surgery. If you want any info PM me. The fat harvest still gets great results, just a much less invasive/ scarring option available now.

Edited by Inevitablue

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Saw the surgeon yesterday they are only doing fragment removal so no need for the fat. They don't do stem cell therapy there but anther vet n Perth does but they are not ortho specialists so it's something to think about down the track

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Yep, the stem cells can only help repair damaged joints, so either after surgery or from the arthritis associated with ED/HD. Some claim stem cells can alleviate the need for hip replacements, which I believe is misleading. The cells can only repair damage, not remodel bone. If a dog has shallow hips, cells are not going to change the phenotype of an animal. What they can do though is if one had a 10 year old dog, the cells could buy a few more years of mobility without putting the animal through a hip replacement. If I had a young animal though I would do the surgery every time.

I hope Gibbs makes a full recovery, medicine can do great things these days. :thumbsup:

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My 4 year old bully was diagnosed with a chronic luxating patella . After xrays the specialist said Peanut has really bad arthritis and decided not to operate . The treatment is cartrophen injections to improve the cartilage, and meticam for pain management.

I asked the vet about stem cell treatment as I know his clinic offers it . He told us that it is still experimental and did not recommend it to us at this point in time.

Just clarifying that my vet did not say 'experimental'

Rather he said that the numbers of dogs per thousand that are measured as having positive concrete outcomes are too low to offer the therapy to every dog.

Edited by huck house

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My 4 year old bully was diagnosed with a chronic luxating patella . After xrays the specialist said Peanut has really bad arthritis and decided not to operate . The treatment is cartrophen injections to improve the cartilage, and meticam for pain management.

I asked the vet about stem cell treatment as I know his clinic offers it . He told us that it is still experimental and did not recommend it to us at this point in time.

My surgeon said much the same yesterday regarding stem cells

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Not stem cells but Kenz had a series of PRP treatments into her shoulder in a final attempt to resolve what was considered to be a chronic case of biceps tendonitis. To me all treatments have to start somewhere and everything is experimental at some point. If they work and the risks are minimal then why not. One specialist wouldn't even consider it and was basically of the view she needed surgery, the second specialist was happy to follow through and at least give it a go. Nearly 9 weeks have passed and my youngster is the best she has been in ages and ages.

I guess all I am saying is sometimes what one specialist writes off as not worth doing another specialist may see the merit in.

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Funny that none of the specialists vets in WA are doing it but i will phone Applecross when i have some time and get some info.

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