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wantsapuppy

Hi Eveyone

50 posts in this topic

what ages are classified as mature age in dogs?

for a lab i'd say, generally 4-5 years. Our last lab was 10 before he lost his puppy-like zest :laugh:

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what ages are classified as mature age in dogs?

Anything beyond "puppyhood". I'd be inclined to say 2-3 years and up.

what ages are classified as mature age in dogs?

for a lab i'd say, generally 4-5 years. Our last lab was 10 before he lost his puppy-like zest :laugh:

Thanks.

Im thinking though that the puppy stage would be good for them to get used to kids as not all dogs are subject to being around kids am i right. Sorry about all the Q's just trying to work out whats the best breed and all that.

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You are right that socialising a pup with children is important if it's to be a family dog.

However some mature dogs have already had that experience.

What ages are you kids?

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Pointer, (english pointer)! Fantastic family pets. They are a gundog and have a similar personality to labs and goldens and they arnt over the top. They can be abit naught as babies if bored but what breed isnt?

They do shed... but not excessively, my pug sheds more!!!

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. They can be abit naught as babies if bored but what breed isnt?

Cant all dogs be naughty when puppies when they get bored. Well i wuold of thought so :laugh:

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Pointer, (english pointer)! Fantastic family pets. They are a gundog and have a similar personality to labs and goldens and they arnt over the top. They can be abit naught as babies if bored but what breed isnt?

They do shed... but not excessively, my pug sheds more!!!

Agree.

I'd rate the following as smooth coated family dog prospects that deserve to be known better:

Pointers

Whippets

Rottweilers

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Pointer, (english pointer)! Fantastic family pets. They are a gundog and have a similar personality to labs and goldens and they arnt over the top. They can be abit naught as babies if bored but what breed isnt?

They do shed... but not excessively, my pug sheds more!!!

Agree.

I'd rate the following as smooth coated family dog prospects that deserve to be known better:

Pointers

Whippets

Rottweilers

I agree... pointers are a great family breed and very few people know about them. Its annoying because they really are such a stella breed!!! And whippets really appeal to me. They are on the one day list! (quite high up actually)

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You are right that socialising a pup with children is important if it's to be a family dog.

However some mature dogs have already had that experience.

What ages are you kids?

I have a 9 almost 10 yo and then a 3 lmost 4 yo, a 2.5 yo and a 1 yo

I agree with poodlefan that it's important for a puppy to be socialised with kids if it's to be a family dog and i agree again on the point that many mature dogs have already had experience with children. I still wouldn't recommend a lab puppy for your family; i think the ages of your children (3 under 5 is a lot of work; kudos to you) requires a great deal of work which doesn't leave a great deal of time for the necessary ongoing training a lab puppy would require to turn into the family pet you would want around your children. A mature lab that illustrates child friendly socialisation behaviours would be the way to go if you were set on a lab.

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. They can be abit naught as babies if bored but what breed isnt?

Cant all dogs be naughty when puppies when they get bored. Well i wuold of thought so :laugh:

quite right...but there's a whole world of difference in terms of the damage that a small breed puppy can do in comparison to a large breed.

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There are many great members here involved with rescue groups.

Dogs obtained thru them are carefully assessed, fostered with families ... and socialised with kids & other animals in many cases.

Why not put a post in the rescue forum and ask?There are home checks, and they will try & match you and a prospective pet.

I wouldn't recommend a puppy ... you have young kids, a working husband... and enough to do without housetraining/obedience training/supervising a puppy.It is like having another human baby ...! There are often lovely young dogs seeking homes , and one of them may be just what your family needs :)

Labs are terrific BUT can easily knock little kids over ..and they shed 25 hrs a day ;)

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raineth   

. They can be abit naught as babies if bored but what breed isnt?

Cant all dogs be naughty when puppies when they get bored. Well i wuold of thought so :laugh:

quite right...but there's a whole world of difference in terms of the damage that a small breed puppy can do in comparison to a large breed.

not necessarily. Sometimes nothing compares to the determination of a terrier :)

My Great Dane puppy chewed up the occasional bit of paper... that was it.

Because he didn't require tonnes of stimulation he didn't really get bored. it was very easy to meet his needs in that respect.

I personally like big dogs for kids (although I know staffs can be great too).

For instance, talking to a boy on the way home from school one day. He told me that both he and his brother have accidentally trodden on their maltese, and both times it suffered a broken foot from it and they got bitten in return (understandably).

I think mature dogs can be great. You would have to check what sort of socialisation it had previously had; and how comfortable it is with kids. But the right mature dog, would be a better choice than any puppy for a busy Mum and Dad with a young and growing family :)

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Thanks everyone YOu have al been so very helpful ( and confusing :rofl: ) This wont be a decision that will be made lightly thats for sure. So i really appreciate all your opinions.

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Rebanne   

I don't think a greyhound would be suitable so I'm glad they "creep you out" a bit :D I reckon a beagle might be good.

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Longclaw   

Retired Greyhound. Large, laid back, good with kids, doesn't require huge amounts of exercise.

With four kids already and planning more I would defininitely go with an older dog. Puppies are extremely time consuming.

there is something about greyhounds that kinda creep me out. Weird i know but hey what can i say :)

I used to be the same!! I had only ever seen them racing on TV, and they looked kind of weird and frenetic - not my cup of tea, as I was more used to labs and german shepherds. But I met some at a Million Paws Walk and they seemed really lovely. Decided to meet some more in a home environment and absolutely Fell In Love.

Now I have two, and have fostered others in the past. I can't imagine thinking of them as weird anymore :laugh:

They are elegant and graceful and goofy and sweet and affectionate - but not overbearing - and require very little exercise or effort, they are quiet in manners, rarely bark, chew, dig or display any of the more annoying doggy behaviours.

They don't have a real doggy odour and need bathing once in a blue moon (I think my guys last got washed... beginning of the year sometime perhaps??). Brushing? Hah! I "brush" mostly with my hands, to increase circulation to the skin, and because my dogs enjoy the attention (patting/stroking). They drop less hair than my short haired cat and are CLEAN dogs - my boy can walk in mud and his legs will be GLEAMING white 20 minutes later.

They do run around like maniacs for 5-odd minutes most days (commonly called 'zoomies'), then they sleep or just chill out with you for the rest of the day. When they are zooming, kids and adults alike are advised to stand perfectly still, or absent themselves entirely! Really that would be my only concern with having a greyhound in your situation.

I do completely understand your desire for a puppy though - I have succumbed to puppiness myself recently :D - and also completely understand if greyhounds just aren't your thing, but I would definitely recommend at least meeting some in person, at some stage :)

I agree with the recommendation for whippets and pointers too :)

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Dogsfevr   

The other factor to consider with big dog is the space it takes in the car when everyone is in it,if the dog won;t fit it won't go on many family outings .

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Pheebs   

what about an Italian Spinone?

I was lucky enough to meet two of these beautiful guys at the vets a few weeks ago. Sooo sweet from what I could gather, but much much bigger than I had anticipated!! They were all shaggy and had just been for a big swim. Such smoochy dogs :D

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There are many great members here involved with rescue groups.

Dogs obtained thru them are carefully assessed, fostered with families ... and socialised with kids & other animals in many cases.

In many cases, but not all. Not every dog from every rescue has been assessed or fostered for any length of time, if at all, and not necessarily in family situation with young kids.

I'd want to know that for sure before consdering any rescue dog.

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raineth   

what about an Italian Spinone?

I was lucky enough to meet two of these beautiful guys at the vets a few weeks ago. Sooo sweet from what I could gather, but much much bigger than I had anticipated!! They were all shaggy and had just been for a big swim. Such smoochy dogs :D

aww pheebs I'm so jealous now!

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