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WExtremeG

Obedience

30 posts in this topic

Hmm.. Will check again, when I let my instructor know that we'd only just completed puppy class (after her getting frustrated that my dog didn't sit/drop/stand straight ect)- she said "I don't think that you should be in my class, but they've put you in here, so they must want you in here...so we'll see how you go"

None of the other puppies from my class are in this class- it's just me and two other older dogs.

Might ask them where they think I should be.

Edited by F11

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Why does it matter how the dog sits? I have done training with my dogs but have never shown or competed, is it something to do with competing?

I'm just happy when my dogs sit, I don't check to make sure it's straight :laugh:

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Why does it matter how the dog sits? I have done training with my dogs but have never shown or competed, is it something to do with competing?

I'm just happy when my dogs sit, I don't check to make sure it's straight :laugh:

Yup it's important for competitive obedience.

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I've only just started to train more seriously fo trialling and one of the trainers has been giving me tips to help. My guy has really sloppy sits and drops he tends to sit diagonally and when he drops he always lays infront of me. I was told if I don't fix up his positioning I would end up losing points. At the time I started obedience I don't think I even knew about trialing so always rewarded any sits/stays even when slightly crocked :o. I will just have to work harder to fix him up but I know for my future dog Correct positioning will be something I work on from the beginning.

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Erny   

Hmm.. Will check again, when I let my instructor know that we'd only just completed puppy class (after her getting frustrated that my dog didn't sit/drop/stand straight ect)- she said "I don't think that you should be in my class, but they've put you in here, so they must want you in here...so we'll see how you go"

None of the other puppies from my class are in this class- it's just me and two other older dogs.

Might ask them where they think I should be.

Hhhhhmmmm .... yep, definitely worth asking them to check that you are where you should be. I agree that working for good sits, drops and adjusting for good position is something to be worked for, but if you feel out of place, not sure and as though you should already know it but you don't, it indicates to me that there's some tuition/guidance that hasn't been given. And that could be an indication that indeed, you're in the wrong class.

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Cosmolo   

Lovely dog, lovely focus. I don't see any reason why you couldn't start making the criteria for reward gradually more difficult, at least at home. In saying that- if the instructor is not doing this in a way you feel comfortable you should speak with them about it.

I don't mind maintaining high levels of reward at training classes given the high level of distraction. But at the same time- if the dog is never challenged (mentally) they will sometimes become bored and regress across all areas of their training.

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Your dog looks lovely and seems to have quite a high level of training already. Just a few things I noticed from the video though - the position of where you stand when you give a sit command seems to be at a 90 degree angle to the dog. Usually in training you stand right next to the dog (ready to walk in a heel position) or directly in front of the dog.

Not sure if this is something you did just for the video but small things like this can be confusing to the dog if you are rewarding and then you change your position in training to the correct one. Also most trainers will suggest doing a series of commands rather than rewarding every single command but that is all fine tuning that you will need to discuss with your instructor.

Good luck as I would love to be able to get one of my new dogs to advanced obedience since by old girl passed away but its very difficult even to find the right dog to progress with.

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Red Fox   

Nice dogsmile.gif. Try having your dog drop from a stand (as opposed to a sit). You'll find it will help a lot with your positions.

Some rear end awareness work along with teaching a clear front and heel position should help too.

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