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Greylvr

New Rescue

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Alkhe   

This is just from my own experience of setting up a rescue so it'd probably be a good idea to do some more research, in case I've missed something (I probably have, it's Monday :o )

Set up policies for the group (and then stick with them- trust me on that one)

Things such as rehoming and surrender policies. Here's a link to some of ours and although everyone will have different ideas about how to run a rescue, it'll give you somewhere to start from. An accepted standard for greyhounds is that they be small dog safe but do not need to be cat safe (as many aren't).

Consider how the rescue will be run.

This is aimed at adopters but again, some things to think about.

Testing.

Write up suitable temp/prey drive tests and use them each and every time. Make sure you keep records of everything behavioural, even minor things.

Records.

Again, very important. This includes behavioural records and health records. Record chip numbers like your life depends on it and make sure adopter information is retained in each dog's file (in the event the dog gets impounded, etc. and that informaiton is required)

Educate adopters.

I try to do this by adding an article every now and then but also include information packs to adopters and general health information. We get a lot of email from people who have adopted greyhounds from elsewhere and haven't been given the information they need. You don't want to be one of those groups who rehomes and runs.

Dol is also a great resource for rescues and not always as scary as some people claim it to be :p

Oh these are awesome thanks. I am toying with the idea of putting all the rescue dogs thru the greenhounds program I know there is one in Victoria but I cant for the life of me find it right now. I know in some states you can do in home training and then have them tested but in Victoria I am sure they need to go to a kennel for a week so still looking into that.

What do you think? Worth it to be able to send the dogs out with a green collar or better to let the owners go through it with their pets?

We have one adopter who moved to Victoria and she's having her girl assessed through GAP. As far as I know, this does involve the dog being kenneled there for some amount of time but I'm not sure of the exacts.

I don't think Victoria has quite the same thing as NSW but it's worth seeing if you can become an approved assessor. Greyhound Safety Net would be best able to answer questions there. Perhaps send them a PM.

http://gap.grv.org.au/Portals/16/GAP%20Fact%20Sheets/GAP%20Fact%20Sheet%20New%20Green-Collar%20Assesments.pdf

They have to stay there for a week :) There's a wait though, to get them in.

Another thing to consider is that if you put all your greyhounds through the Greenhound assessment, in addition to the cost ($150 non-refundable) it will add to the waiting list for dogs that will go through GAP. Ie, for every dog that has safe backup with a rescue and goes through it, one that doesn't can't. It isn't as simple as that I'm sure, but it's just another thing to think about. I suppose it depends on what your aims are for the rescue you operate. If your aim is to get as many dogs into good homes as possible, it may be better to spend money, time and effort elsewhere.

One of the good things about greyhound rescues is that they are able to pick up dogs that fall through the cracks, and end up in pounds/on gumtree etc, rather than going through GAP. GAP only takes on so many, and there is a waiting list for that as well, which is a deterrent for some owners/trainers. I suppose it depends on your

I'm not saying that it's a bad idea, just .. there are a lot of elements to think about, I guess.

Also, I really don't mean to be rude, but it sounds like there are a few things to think about before you set it up. Whether to register as a charity, what that means and requires.. there are a lot of things to get your head around, and it's not for the faint hearted. Greyhound Safety Net are based in Mornington already and I'm sure they are always in need of foster carers - I've never seen a rescue that couldn't use a few extra hands, PARTICULARLY if they are able to foster..

Perhaps it would be better to join with an established group and foster and get involved in the running of that before starting your own? I know I said this in another thread a few days ago, about starting a rescue, but I really do think there is value in helping existing groups rather than having a lot of smaller ones. The less competition there is between groups who have broadly the same aims (ie, to help greyhounds), teh better - you don't want to have to fight for people's attention, money, support, time, effort.. and it will invariably happen, because an organisation is an organisation is an organisation. Each has aims and requirements, and particularly when they're involved in dog rescue, there is always a need for more money for vet fees, transport, marketing, .. everything. The less double up there is in terms of admin and overheads among people who want to work for the same thing, the more each dollar can do.

Kay's Greys is another Melbourne based greyhound rescue group - I fostered for Kay in a former life, when she was part of Greyhound Rescue. Which is Sydney based but had a branch in Vic at the time (not sure if it still does). There are others too, perhaps get in contact with them and see what would be really helpful for them?

I do understand the desire to do it yourself and run things your way, etc etc- trust me, I'm an introverted control freak. But I just often see little rescues starting up here and there and think, all the time and money spent trying to establish yourself could've gone so much further. If the aim is to get more dogs into good homes, a critical mass is a really good thing. If the general public need to know more about waht great pets greyhounds can make (and I think they do!), then if people worked together to get that message out, it's better than each group trying to get their own name known. It's better to have a broader focus, I suppose, and focus on the bigger picture.

Despite all of that - if it's possible to become a Greenhjound assessor that would be BRILLIANT. You could do SO, so much good work for all sorts of people. I'm sure all greyhound rescue organisations would love the chance to get their hounds assessed without the requirement that they send them away, pay $150, (and in most cases, I doubt they want to co-operate and give $$ to the industry....).

I really don't want to be a mean, rude person to come and burst your bubble, but I really, really love greyhounds.. I guess I just think in many cases, people's time and effort would be better spent bolstering the things already in existence instead of starting new ones.

There are very good points but I have fostered in the past and just had too many bad experiences. Dogs placed in homes I didnt think were acceptable and had no say. Rescues knowing I had children sending me dogs that were not good with kids, being stuck with vet bills that the rescue should have paid but never did.

I ran a successful rescue for 11 years and love it. I am very picky on where my dogs go, I had humane societies shipping me dogs that would be put down if I didnt work with them. Some took 6 months to a year to rehab but I was very successful. I have seen rescues bad mouth the race dog owners and I do not think that is the proper way to help these dogs. I want the dogs to come from the track to a home where they are worked with to get over fears and learn to live with a family. I dont ever plan to board a dog or have them in kennels, just a nice warm house :)

I just want to be a small organization that helps dogs. I have a trainer that is willing to send me the dogs they can no longer keep and she may have friends too that need our help. I want to focus on ex racers and getting them into a retirement home instead of them being euthanized.

On the other subject I may look into becoming an assessor it would be great to be able to offer this service free to rescues, I think it would go a long way to helping more greyhounds than just those that find themselves at my house.

Ahh, I didn't realise you'd actually run one before!

I wasn't trying to pick on your personally, just like.. they're general things for people to think about, I guess :)

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Greylvr   

Hardy you seem to be very together and looks like you are doing a wonderful job kudos to you.

Alkhe i didnt feel you were picking on me, your suggestions and thoughts were great.

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Maddy   

Hardy you seem to be very together and looks like you are doing a wonderful job kudos to you.

Alkhe i didnt feel you were picking on me, your suggestions and thoughts were great.

It took plenty of mistakes to get to this point though- lots of them I could have avoided if I'd known what to watch out for.

Also, if you're in Victoria, might be worth having a look here- http://www.drav.org.au/

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This is just from my own experience of setting up a rescue so it'd probably be a good idea to do some more research, in case I've missed something (I probably have, it's Monday :o )

Set up policies for the group (and then stick with them- trust me on that one)

Things such as rehoming and surrender policies. Here's a link to some of ours and although everyone will have different ideas about how to run a rescue, it'll give you somewhere to start from. An accepted standard for greyhounds is that they be small dog safe but do not need to be cat safe (as many aren't).

Consider how the rescue will be run.

This is aimed at adopters but again, some things to think about.

Testing.

Write up suitable temp/prey drive tests and use them each and every time. Make sure you keep records of everything behavioural, even minor things.

Records.

Again, very important. This includes behavioural records and health records. Record chip numbers like your life depends on it and make sure adopter information is retained in each dog's file (in the event the dog gets impounded, etc. and that informaiton is required)

Educate adopters.

I try to do this by adding an article every now and then but also include information packs to adopters and general health information. We get a lot of email from people who have adopted greyhounds from elsewhere and haven't been given the information they need. You don't want to be one of those groups who rehomes and runs.

Dol is also a great resource for rescues and not always as scary as some people claim it to be :p

Oh these are awesome thanks. I am toying with the idea of putting all the rescue dogs thru the greenhounds program I know there is one in Victoria but I cant for the life of me find it right now. I know in some states you can do in home training and then have them tested but in Victoria I am sure they need to go to a kennel for a week so still looking into that.

What do you think? Worth it to be able to send the dogs out with a green collar or better to let the owners go through it with their pets?

We have one adopter who moved to Victoria and she's having her girl assessed through GAP. As far as I know, this does involve the dog being kenneled there for some amount of time but I'm not sure of the exacts.

I don't think Victoria has quite the same thing as NSW but it's worth seeing if you can become an approved assessor. Greyhound Safety Net would be best able to answer questions there. Perhaps send them a PM.

http://gap.grv.org.au/Portals/16/GAP%20Fact%20Sheets/GAP%20Fact%20Sheet%20New%20Green-Collar%20Assesments.pdf

They have to stay there for a week :) There's a wait though, to get them in.

Another thing to consider is that if you put all your greyhounds through the Greenhound assessment, in addition to the cost ($150 non-refundable) it will add to the waiting list for dogs that will go through GAP. Ie, for every dog that has safe backup with a rescue and goes through it, one that doesn't can't. It isn't as simple as that I'm sure, but it's just another thing to think about. I suppose it depends on what your aims are for the rescue you operate. If your aim is to get as many dogs into good homes as possible, it may be better to spend money, time and effort elsewhere.

One of the good things about greyhound rescues is that they are able to pick up dogs that fall through the cracks, and end up in pounds/on gumtree etc, rather than going through GAP. GAP only takes on so many, and there is a waiting list for that as well, which is a deterrent for some owners/trainers. I suppose it depends on your

I'm not saying that it's a bad idea, just .. there are a lot of elements to think about, I guess.

Also, I really don't mean to be rude, but it sounds like there are a few things to think about before you set it up. Whether to register as a charity, what that means and requires.. there are a lot of things to get your head around, and it's not for the faint hearted. Greyhound Safety Net are based in Mornington already and I'm sure they are always in need of foster carers - I've never seen a rescue that couldn't use a few extra hands, PARTICULARLY if they are able to foster..

Perhaps it would be better to join with an established group and foster and get involved in the running of that before starting your own? I know I said this in another thread a few days ago, about starting a rescue, but I really do think there is value in helping existing groups rather than having a lot of smaller ones. The less competition there is between groups who have broadly the same aims (ie, to help greyhounds), teh better - you don't want to have to fight for people's attention, money, support, time, effort.. and it will invariably happen, because an organisation is an organisation is an organisation. Each has aims and requirements, and particularly when they're involved in dog rescue, there is always a need for more money for vet fees, transport, marketing, .. everything. The less double up there is in terms of admin and overheads among people who want to work for the same thing, the more each dollar can do.

Kay's Greys is another Melbourne based greyhound rescue group - I fostered for Kay in a former life, when she was part of Greyhound Rescue. Which is Sydney based but had a branch in Vic at the time (not sure if it still does). There are others too, perhaps get in contact with them and see what would be really helpful for them?

I do understand the desire to do it yourself and run things your way, etc etc- trust me, I'm an introverted control freak. But I just often see little rescues starting up here and there and think, all the time and money spent trying to establish yourself could've gone so much further. If the aim is to get more dogs into good homes, a critical mass is a really good thing. If the general public need to know more about waht great pets greyhounds can make (and I think they do!), then if people worked together to get that message out, it's better than each group trying to get their own name known. It's better to have a broader focus, I suppose, and focus on the bigger picture.

Despite all of that - if it's possible to become a Greenhjound assessor that would be BRILLIANT. You could do SO, so much good work for all sorts of people. I'm sure all greyhound rescue organisations would love the chance to get their hounds assessed without the requirement that they send them away, pay $150, (and in most cases, I doubt they want to co-operate and give $$ to the industry....).

I really don't want to be a mean, rude person to come and burst your bubble, but I really, really love greyhounds.. I guess I just think in many cases, people's time and effort would be better spent bolstering the things already in existence instead of starting new ones.

There are very good points but I have fostered in the past and just had too many bad experiences. Dogs placed in homes I didnt think were acceptable and had no say. Rescues knowing I had children sending me dogs that were not good with kids, being stuck with vet bills that the rescue should have paid but never did.

I ran a successful rescue for 11 years and love it. I am very picky on where my dogs go, I had humane societies shipping me dogs that would be put down if I didnt work with them. Some took 6 months to a year to rehab but I was very successful. I have seen rescues bad mouth the race dog owners and I do not think that is the proper way to help these dogs. I want the dogs to come from the track to a home where they are worked with to get over fears and learn to live with a family. I dont ever plan to board a dog or have them in kennels, just a nice warm house :)

I just want to be a small organization that helps dogs. I have a trainer that is willing to send me the dogs they can no longer keep and she may have friends too that need our help. I want to focus on ex racers and getting them into a retirement home instead of them being euthanized.

On the other subject I may look into becoming an assessor it would be great to be able to offer this service free to rescues, I think it would go a long way to helping more greyhounds than just those that find themselves at my house.

You might find it helpful to see what other greyhound adoption groups are doing in Victoria and learn more about the industry before you set something up.

If you are exclusively taking dogs from only one or two trainers you can't really expect charity donations. You might like to look at the bigger picture to get an idea about how your organisation should be run and how to manage intake in an effective way.

You also need to know more about the standards required for a dog to pass the green collar test if you are going to be selling greyhound as pets.

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Greylvr   

This is just from my own experience of setting up a rescue so it'd probably be a good idea to do some more research, in case I've missed something (I probably have, it's Monday :o )

Set up policies for the group (and then stick with them- trust me on that one)

Things such as rehoming and surrender policies. Here's a link to some of ours and although everyone will have different ideas about how to run a rescue, it'll give you somewhere to start from. An accepted standard for greyhounds is that they be small dog safe but do not need to be cat safe (as many aren't).

Consider how the rescue will be run.

This is aimed at adopters but again, some things to think about.

Testing.

Write up suitable temp/prey drive tests and use them each and every time. Make sure you keep records of everything behavioural, even minor things.

Records.

Again, very important. This includes behavioural records and health records. Record chip numbers like your life depends on it and make sure adopter information is retained in each dog's file (in the event the dog gets impounded, etc. and that informaiton is required)

Educate adopters.

I try to do this by adding an article every now and then but also include information packs to adopters and general health information. We get a lot of email from people who have adopted greyhounds from elsewhere and haven't been given the information they need. You don't want to be one of those groups who rehomes and runs.

Dol is also a great resource for rescues and not always as scary as some people claim it to be :p

Oh these are awesome thanks. I am toying with the idea of putting all the rescue dogs thru the greenhounds program I know there is one in Victoria but I cant for the life of me find it right now. I know in some states you can do in home training and then have them tested but in Victoria I am sure they need to go to a kennel for a week so still looking into that.

What do you think? Worth it to be able to send the dogs out with a green collar or better to let the owners go through it with their pets?

We have one adopter who moved to Victoria and she's having her girl assessed through GAP. As far as I know, this does involve the dog being kenneled there for some amount of time but I'm not sure of the exacts.

I don't think Victoria has quite the same thing as NSW but it's worth seeing if you can become an approved assessor. Greyhound Safety Net would be best able to answer questions there. Perhaps send them a PM.

http://gap.grv.org.au/Portals/16/GAP%20Fact%20Sheets/GAP%20Fact%20Sheet%20New%20Green-Collar%20Assesments.pdf

They have to stay there for a week :) There's a wait though, to get them in.

Another thing to consider is that if you put all your greyhounds through the Greenhound assessment, in addition to the cost ($150 non-refundable) it will add to the waiting list for dogs that will go through GAP. Ie, for every dog that has safe backup with a rescue and goes through it, one that doesn't can't. It isn't as simple as that I'm sure, but it's just another thing to think about. I suppose it depends on what your aims are for the rescue you operate. If your aim is to get as many dogs into good homes as possible, it may be better to spend money, time and effort elsewhere.

One of the good things about greyhound rescues is that they are able to pick up dogs that fall through the cracks, and end up in pounds/on gumtree etc, rather than going through GAP. GAP only takes on so many, and there is a waiting list for that as well, which is a deterrent for some owners/trainers. I suppose it depends on your

I'm not saying that it's a bad idea, just .. there are a lot of elements to think about, I guess.

Also, I really don't mean to be rude, but it sounds like there are a few things to think about before you set it up. Whether to register as a charity, what that means and requires.. there are a lot of things to get your head around, and it's not for the faint hearted. Greyhound Safety Net are based in Mornington already and I'm sure they are always in need of foster carers - I've never seen a rescue that couldn't use a few extra hands, PARTICULARLY if they are able to foster..

Perhaps it would be better to join with an established group and foster and get involved in the running of that before starting your own? I know I said this in another thread a few days ago, about starting a rescue, but I really do think there is value in helping existing groups rather than having a lot of smaller ones. The less competition there is between groups who have broadly the same aims (ie, to help greyhounds), teh better - you don't want to have to fight for people's attention, money, support, time, effort.. and it will invariably happen, because an organisation is an organisation is an organisation. Each has aims and requirements, and particularly when they're involved in dog rescue, there is always a need for more money for vet fees, transport, marketing, .. everything. The less double up there is in terms of admin and overheads among people who want to work for the same thing, the more each dollar can do.

Kay's Greys is another Melbourne based greyhound rescue group - I fostered for Kay in a former life, when she was part of Greyhound Rescue. Which is Sydney based but had a branch in Vic at the time (not sure if it still does). There are others too, perhaps get in contact with them and see what would be really helpful for them?

I do understand the desire to do it yourself and run things your way, etc etc- trust me, I'm an introverted control freak. But I just often see little rescues starting up here and there and think, all the time and money spent trying to establish yourself could've gone so much further. If the aim is to get more dogs into good homes, a critical mass is a really good thing. If the general public need to know more about waht great pets greyhounds can make (and I think they do!), then if people worked together to get that message out, it's better than each group trying to get their own name known. It's better to have a broader focus, I suppose, and focus on the bigger picture.

Despite all of that - if it's possible to become a Greenhjound assessor that would be BRILLIANT. You could do SO, so much good work for all sorts of people. I'm sure all greyhound rescue organisations would love the chance to get their hounds assessed without the requirement that they send them away, pay $150, (and in most cases, I doubt they want to co-operate and give $$ to the industry....).

I really don't want to be a mean, rude person to come and burst your bubble, but I really, really love greyhounds.. I guess I just think in many cases, people's time and effort would be better spent bolstering the things already in existence instead of starting new ones.

There are very good points but I have fostered in the past and just had too many bad experiences. Dogs placed in homes I didnt think were acceptable and had no say. Rescues knowing I had children sending me dogs that were not good with kids, being stuck with vet bills that the rescue should have paid but never did.

I ran a successful rescue for 11 years and love it. I am very picky on where my dogs go, I had humane societies shipping me dogs that would be put down if I didnt work with them. Some took 6 months to a year to rehab but I was very successful. I have seen rescues bad mouth the race dog owners and I do not think that is the proper way to help these dogs. I want the dogs to come from the track to a home where they are worked with to get over fears and learn to live with a family. I dont ever plan to board a dog or have them in kennels, just a nice warm house :)

I just want to be a small organization that helps dogs. I have a trainer that is willing to send me the dogs they can no longer keep and she may have friends too that need our help. I want to focus on ex racers and getting them into a retirement home instead of them being euthanized.

On the other subject I may look into becoming an assessor it would be great to be able to offer this service free to rescues, I think it would go a long way to helping more greyhounds than just those that find themselves at my house.

You might find it helpful to see what other greyhound adoption groups are doing in Victoria and learn more about the industry before you set something up.

If you are exclusively taking dogs from only one or two trainers you can't really expect charity donations. You might like to look at the bigger picture to get an idea about how your organisation should be run and how to manage intake in an effective way.

You also need to know more about the standards required for a dog to pass the green collar test if you are going to be selling greyhound as pets.

I will be looking into the green collar program too. I dont like the word selling sounds like a dog broker, I will be adopting out dogs as pets.

Not sure what you mean about managing the intake.

The trainer we will be getting the dogs from is very strict on what dogs leave her kennel so between her and then getting the dogs into our home and assessing their temperaments ( I volunteered at a shelter doing temp testing on dogs) we should be ok if a problem arises we will have to deal with it properly.

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I will be looking into the green collar program too. I dont like the word selling sounds like a dog broker, I will be adopting out dogs as pets.

You can call it adoption but in the eyes of the law you will be selling dogs as pets. Same as a dog breeder does.

Not sure what you mean about managing the intake.

All Australian greyhound adoption groups are under immense pressure to take more dogs all the time. You need to be aware of the types of problems groups face so you can determine how you will manage that and what you do with dogs that are returned to you.

The trainer we will be getting the dogs from is very strict on what dogs leave her kennel so between her and then getting the dogs into our home and assessing their temperaments ( I volunteered at a shelter doing temp testing on dogs) we should be ok if a problem arises we will have to deal with it properly.

Nothing wrong with a trainer being strict but you are the one taking on the risk and responsibility.

Do you know if the dogs you will be taking are owned by the trainer? Do you know how to find out? How many dogs does the trainer turn over a year? What happens to the dogs the trainer says will not make a good pet? How does the trainer test the dogs?

If you are helping a trainer place their dogs why shouldn't the trainer pay you for your work?

I admire trainers who make sure their dogs are all rehomed but not if they expect everyone to help them for free while they keep bringing in more dogs. If you want to run as a charity and fundraise you can't be seen as working for a commercial greyhound trainer. That wouldnt go down well at all. If you want to pay your own costs then you can take dogs from whoever you like. If the trainer is paying you to take their dogs even better. I can't imagine that you will attract too many volunteers if you just work for the one trainer either.

There are two big groups in Victoria , so don't write them off before you know what they do and how they do it. The people running the groups have been doing so for many years. There are laws in Victoria about animal businesses and you also need to familiarise yourself with all that might apply to you if you start an organisation.

If the only dogs you rehome are the ones you foster yourself, you are probably better off just doing it privately and not starting a new organisation.

Like others have mentioned, I would always advise carers to work with an established group so that the full support is there if needed.

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Greylvr   
All Australian greyhound adoption groups are under immense pressure to take more dogs all the time. You need to be aware of the types of problems groups face so you can determine how you will manage that and what you do with dogs that are returned to you.

I see what you are saying, we will be writing up what we will take and wont take etc getting this all on paper will help us stick to the guidelines we set up.

Do you know if the dogs you will be taking are owned by the trainer? Do you know how to find out? How many dogs does the trainer turn over a year? What happens to the dogs the trainer says will not make a good pet? How does the trainer test the dogs?

Yes they are owned by her The dogs the trainer does not feel would not make good pets she has put down at her vet. She has other dogs, has them handled by other people, has a child and spends a ton of time with the dogs but like I said once they get to me we will also do temp tests, cat testing, and child testing.

If you are helping a trainer place their dogs why shouldn't the trainer pay you for your work?

I wouldnt require nor ask someone to do this but thats just me and my choice.

I admire trainers who make sure their dogs are all rehomed but not if they expect everyone to help them for free while they keep bringing in more dogs. If you want to run as a charity and fundraise you can't be seen as working for a commercial greyhound trainer. That wouldnt go down well at all. If you want to pay your own costs then you can take dogs from whoever you like. If the trainer is paying you to take their dogs even better. I can't imagine that you will attract too many volunteers if you just work for the one trainer either.

People will get more dogs, and produce more puppies each year regardless if dogs are taken or put down. My concern is for the dogs once their racing career is over if I can save them from being put down I will be happy with that. You might be surprised who is interested in helping smaller groups.

There are two big groups in Victoria , so don't write them off before you know what they do and how they do it. The people running the groups have been doing so for many years. There are laws in Victoria about animal businesses and you also need to familiarise yourself with all that might apply to you if you start an organisation.

Yup we are working on gathering all the info this week. We will be talking with the right agencies this week and make sure we are within the laws at all times. I have no doubt that these groups are great and do wonderful work. I am not trying to compete with them or anything like that I prefer rescues work to help each other not compete with each other.

Like others have mentioned, I would always advise carers to work with an established group so that the full support is there if needed.

I respect that opinion and other have mentioned it but I have explained my issues in an earlier post. If we all had this out look there would be none of these wonderful groups there are today we would all be fostering for the RSPCA but sometimes there is a need that a smaller group can fill.

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All Australian greyhound adoption groups are under immense pressure to take more dogs all the time. You need to be aware of the types of problems groups face so you can determine how you will manage that and what you do with dogs that are returned to you.

I see what you are saying, we will be writing up what we will take and wont take etc getting this all on paper will help us stick to the guidelines we set up.

Do you know if the dogs you will be taking are owned by the trainer? Do you know how to find out? How many dogs does the trainer turn over a year? What happens to the dogs the trainer says will not make a good pet? How does the trainer test the dogs?

Yes they are owned by her The dogs the trainer does not feel would not make good pets she has put down at her vet. She has other dogs, has them handled by other people, has a child and spends a ton of time with the dogs but like I said once they get to me we will also do temp tests, cat testing, and child testing.

If you are helping a trainer place their dogs why shouldn't the trainer pay you for your work?

I wouldnt require nor ask someone to do this but thats just me and my choice.

I admire trainers who make sure their dogs are all rehomed but not if they expect everyone to help them for free while they keep bringing in more dogs. If you want to run as a charity and fundraise you can't be seen as working for a commercial greyhound trainer. That wouldnt go down well at all. If you want to pay your own costs then you can take dogs from whoever you like. If the trainer is paying you to take their dogs even better. I can't imagine that you will attract too many volunteers if you just work for the one trainer either.

People will get more dogs, and produce more puppies each year regardless if dogs are taken or put down. My concern is for the dogs once their racing career is over if I can save them from being put down I will be happy with that. You might be surprised who is interested in helping smaller groups.

There are two big groups in Victoria , so don't write them off before you know what they do and how they do it. The people running the groups have been doing so for many years. There are laws in Victoria about animal businesses and you also need to familiarise yourself with all that might apply to you if you start an organisation.

Yup we are working on gathering all the info this week. We will be talking with the right agencies this week and make sure we are within the laws at all times. I have no doubt that these groups are great and do wonderful work. I am not trying to compete with them or anything like that I prefer rescues work to help each other not compete with each other.

Like others have mentioned, I would always advise carers to work with an established group so that the full support is there if needed.

I respect that opinion and other have mentioned it but I have explained my issues in an earlier post. If we all had this out look there would be none of these wonderful groups there are today we would all be fostering for the RSPCA but sometimes there is a need that a smaller group can fill.

The various greyhound groups in Victoria were started to fill different specific needs. But you haven't really identified why there is a need for a new group to start. Except that you don't trust them?

I have spoken to thousands of people about greyhounds at promotions, rehomed many hundreds of greyhounds and so I know what sort of questions people ask. Its not the size of the group that people generally care about, it's the dogs and where they all come from. If you set up a charity that assists one trainer in this way you are basically telling the public that this trainer is a charity case.

Most trainers have to wait a long time to get their dogs into the programs, and the responsible trainers do this even though it costs them money and means they have less space for paying dogs. Why would you give one trainer special assistance and charity over all other trainers? How do you think this alliance will be perceived by the public?

Starting a new group is competing with other groups, same as any other type of business. Before you rush in, why not spend some time volunteering with other groups to find out all you can about the big picture in Victoria and how greyhound racing and adoption is perceived? Then you will have a much better idea of whether another group is needed, where it is needed, and whether you will have the resources to provide the level of support that adopters and volunteers require.

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Rebanne   

I have never had a dog kill another persons pets but I am very aware of the dogs we put out there. In the case of Sm staffs we placed they couldnt have other small pets nor have neighbors that had cats or dogs on either side of them. The risk of another animal being hurt because I wasnt diligent just isnt worth it IMO

what happened if they moved?

Look at GAP and GSN closely. Might not be any need to reinvent the wheel. GAP are the only ones who can issue a green collar in Victoria.

Edited by Rebanne

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I have never had a dog kill another persons pets but I am very aware of the dogs we put out there. In the case of Sm staffs we placed they couldnt have other small pets nor have neighbors that had cats or dogs on either side of them. The risk of another animal being hurt because I wasnt diligent just isnt worth it IMO

what happened if they moved?

Look at GAP and GSN closely. Might not be any need to reinvent the wheel. GAP are the only ones who can issue a green collar in Victoria.

And what if neighbours changed, bought a new pet, had someone to stay with a small pet and so on? I would consider such aggressive dogs - no matter what breed - to be unrehomable. They would be euthanased in my rescue - that would be the responsible thing to do because no matter how hard you may have tried, you are putting a very aggressive dog back into the community which is placing everyone else and their pets at risk.

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Greylvr   

I have never had a dog kill another persons pets but I am very aware of the dogs we put out there. In the case of Sm staffs we placed they couldnt have other small pets nor have neighbors that had cats or dogs on either side of them. The risk of another animal being hurt because I wasnt diligent just isnt worth it IMO

what happened if they moved?

Look at GAP and GSN closely. Might not be any need to reinvent the wheel. GAP are the only ones who can issue a green collar in Victoria.

And what if neighbours changed, bought a new pet, had someone to stay with a small pet and so on? I would consider such aggressive dogs - no matter what breed - to be unrehomable. They would be euthanased in my rescue - that would be the responsible thing to do because no matter how hard you may have tried, you are putting a very aggressive dog back into the community which is placing everyone else and their pets at risk.

Most of the Am Staffs were ok with smaller animals but it was a risk that I wasnt willing to take because the breed is in trouble and even one chasing another dog was bad. We never had an issue, and the people who adopted from us were well educated and understood responsible bull breed ownership.

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Rebanne   

I have never had a dog kill another persons pets but I am very aware of the dogs we put out there. In the case of Sm staffs we placed they couldnt have other small pets nor have neighbors that had cats or dogs on either side of them. The risk of another animal being hurt because I wasnt diligent just isnt worth it IMO

what happened if they moved?

Look at GAP and GSN closely. Might not be any need to reinvent the wheel. GAP are the only ones who can issue a green collar in Victoria.

And what if neighbours changed, bought a new pet, had someone to stay with a small pet and so on? I would consider such aggressive dogs - no matter what breed - to be unrehomable. They would be euthanased in my rescue - that would be the responsible thing to do because no matter how hard you may have tried, you are putting a very aggressive dog back into the community which is placing everyone else and their pets at risk.

Most of the Am Staffs were ok with smaller animals but it was a risk that I wasnt willing to take because the breed is in trouble and even one chasing another dog was bad. We never had an issue, and the people who adopted from us were well educated and understood responsible bull breed ownership.

So no one moved and the neighbours didn't either, nor did the neighbours themselves get a small pet? I'm trying to understand your original statement and your answer to the questions that have been raised by that statement.

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Greylvr   
The various greyhound groups in Victoria were started to fill different specific needs. But you haven't really identified why there is a need for a new group to start. Except that you don't trust them?

Dog are still being put down because the wait to get them into GAP can be up to 6 months. There are trainers that would love to get their dogs in bit for one reason or another cant wait the 6 months. I would say there is still a need for a group who can take in these dogs that are being put down.

I have spoken to thousands of people about greyhounds at promotions, rehomed many hundreds of greyhounds and so I know what sort of questions people ask. Its not the size of the group that people generally care about, it's the dogs and where they all come from. If you set up a charity that assists one trainer in this way you are basically telling the public that this trainer is a charity case.

Most trainers have to wait a long time to get their dogs into the programs, and the responsible trainers do this even though it costs them money and means they have less space for paying dogs. Why would you give one trainer special assistance and charity over all other trainers? How do you think this alliance will be perceived by the public?

It will grow to be more than just this one trainer, its a starting point. We are not helping just this one trainer we want to help others if they need it. If they dont no problem, if they get the dogs into GAP or this other rescue thats great too as long as they are saved.

Starting a new group is competing with other groups, same as any other type of business. Before you rush in, why not spend some time volunteering with other groups to find out all you can about the big picture in Victoria and how greyhound racing and adoption is perceived? Then you will have a much better idea of whether another group is needed, where it is needed, and whether you will have the resources to provide the level of support that adopters and volunteers require.

I plan to go to some of GAPs events and having a good time getting to know people from all over. I dont understand the problem with a couple saving a few dogs here and there. We arent going to rush out and try to raise all this money and gobble up the resources, its most likely that these other rescues wont even know who we are and certainly wont feel a crunch on their groups because a few people save some dogs. I understand you dont like the idea of a new group I can feel it in your posts but really its not like we are trying to take over anything here in victoria we simply want to help some dogs.

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Greylvr   

So no one moved and the neighbours didn't either, nor did the neighbours themselves get a small pet? I'm trying to understand your original statement and your answer to the questions that have been raised by that statement.

If they moved they had to report to us that they had moved. You have to understand that we took the placement of Am staffs very serious and the people were educated on what it meant to own this breed by the time we were done educating them they understood they couldn't get new pets and they had to be very diligent. They also had to be home owners (landlords didnt allow the breed) and have home insurance that even allowed the breed so it wasn't a impulse decision on their part. This was some years ago and luckily we didnt have problems.

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I'm not against people starting groups if there is a need for a group. But you havent identified a need to start a separate group except to describe your personal problems with other groups.

It's a bit unfair of you to do this and think that you can do better on your own when you seem to know very little about the groups you will be competing against. If you tell that story to the public it reflects badly on other rescues.

There have been others that rushed in to do what you are doing, and any mistakes they make reflects badly on all greyhound rescue and raises welfare concerns. So that is why alarm bells ring when you talk in a way that shows you are very unfamiliar with how adoption works in Victoria and the reasonable expectations of adopters.

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Greylvr   

I'm not against people starting groups if there is a need for a group. But you havent identified a need to start a separate group except to describe your personal problems with other groups.

It's a bit unfair of you to do this and think that you can do better on your own when you seem to know very little about the groups you will be competing against. If you tell that story to the public it reflects badly on other rescues.

There have been others that rushed in to do what you are doing, and any mistakes they make reflects badly on all greyhound rescue and raises welfare concerns. So that is why alarm bells ring when you talk in a way that shows you are very unfamiliar with how adoption works in Victoria and the reasonable expectations of adopters.

I would never say anything to reflect badly on any rescue group. So the dogs that are dying while waiting for a spot in the larger groups arent a good reason to help them? I know that there are dog being PTS simply because they are out of time at the kennel and other rescues have no room for them and the wait can be 6 months or more. We will be getting all the laws and regulations we need to stick by this week. We have no intention of breaking any laws or placing dogs in homes that would be a danger to them or the breed.

Here I thought victoria was different but I guess its not, I guess some still see rescues as a competition which is sad because its not rescues should never feel they need to compete doesnt do much for the big picture. :mad How do you see us as competing against other groups? These are dogs that they couldnt take any way so wouldnt that be helping in stead of competing.

If there are dogs dying because they cant get into a rescue isnt that a need? What if there was a group that could just save 2 or 3 dogs a month thats more dogs saved and not put to death just because there was no room at the rescues.

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tdierikx   

It's not a case of hown MANY we can save/rehome... but of how WELL we can do it...

It only takes one wrong placement of a dog from rescue for the public perception to be tarnished against ALL rescues.

Is there a specific reason that you can't affiliate with one of the established and well respected groups already doing what you want to do?

T.

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Rebanne   

I'm not against people starting groups if there is a need for a group. But you havent identified a need to start a separate group except to describe your personal problems with other groups.

It's a bit unfair of you to do this and think that you can do better on your own when you seem to know very little about the groups you will be competing against. If you tell that story to the public it reflects badly on other rescues.

There have been others that rushed in to do what you are doing, and any mistakes they make reflects badly on all greyhound rescue and raises welfare concerns. So that is why alarm bells ring when you talk in a way that shows you are very unfamiliar with how adoption works in Victoria and the reasonable expectations of adopters.

I would never say anything to reflect badly on any rescue group. So the dogs that are dying while waiting for a spot in the larger groups arent a good reason to help them? I know that there are dog being PTS simply because they are out of time at the kennel and other rescues have no room for them and the wait can be 6 months or more. We will be getting all the laws and regulations we need to stick by this week. We have no intention of breaking any laws or placing dogs in homes that would be a danger to them or the breed.

Here I thought victoria was different but I guess its not, I guess some still see rescues as a competition which is sad because its not rescues should never feel they need to compete doesnt do much for the big picture. :mad How do you see us as competing against other groups? These are dogs that they couldnt take any way so wouldnt that be helping in stead of competing.

If there are dogs dying because they cant get into a rescue isnt that a need? What if there was a group that could just save 2 or 3 dogs a month thats more dogs saved and not put to death just because there was no room at the rescues.

lack of foster carers is what hold up the works - for all rescues.

will you have the same restrictions on the greyhounds as you did the amstaff's - owned home, no neighbours with other pets? What will you do with your rescue dog if it turns out not suitable with your kids or cat? Sometimes their true personality takes a while to shine through. What's your back up plan?

And I'm not a rescue, no competition to me, but I am very aware of how hard groups like GAP and GSN have had to fight for the greyhound and I am very cautious when someone new comes on the scene promising all sorts of stuff. Greyhounds have a lot to lose.

Edited by Rebanne

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Greylvr   

It's not a case of hown MANY we can save/rehome... but of how WELL we can do it...

It only takes one wrong placement of a dog from rescue for the public perception to be tarnished against ALL rescues.

Is there a specific reason that you can't affiliate with one of the established and well respected groups already doing what you want to do?

T.

I agree with the bolded statements. I have already answered the question a bit back.

I'm not against people starting groups if there is a need for a group. But you havent identified a need to start a separate group except to describe your personal problems with other groups.

It's a bit unfair of you to do this and think that you can do better on your own when you seem to know very little about the groups you will be competing against. If you tell that story to the public it reflects badly on other rescues.

There have been others that rushed in to do what you are doing, and any mistakes they make reflects badly on all greyhound rescue and raises welfare concerns. So that is why alarm bells ring when you talk in a way that shows you are very unfamiliar with how adoption works in Victoria and the reasonable expectations of adopters.

I would never say anything to reflect badly on any rescue group. So the dogs that are dying while waiting for a spot in the larger groups arent a good reason to help them? I know that there are dog being PTS simply because they are out of time at the kennel and other rescues have no room for them and the wait can be 6 months or more. We will be getting all the laws and regulations we need to stick by this week. We have no intention of breaking any laws or placing dogs in homes that would be a danger to them or the breed.

Here I thought victoria was different but I guess its not, I guess some still see rescues as a competition which is sad because its not rescues should never feel they need to compete doesnt do much for the big picture. :mad How do you see us as competing against other groups? These are dogs that they couldnt take any way so wouldnt that be helping in stead of competing.

If there are dogs dying because they cant get into a rescue isnt that a need? What if there was a group that could just save 2 or 3 dogs a month thats more dogs saved and not put to death just because there was no room at the rescues.

lack of foster carers is what hold up the works - for all rescues.

will you have the same restrictions on the greyhounds as you did the amstaff's - owned home, no neighbours with other pets? What will you do with your rescue dog if it turns out not suitable with your kids or cat? Sometimes their true personality takes a while to shine through. What's your back up plan?

And I'm not a rescue, no competition to me, but I am very aware of how hard groups like GAP and GSN have had to fight for the greyhound and I am very cautious when someone new comes on the scene promising all sorts of stuff. Greyhounds have a lot to lose.

No I wont have the same restrictions on the greyhounds as we did on the Am Staffs. Many greyhounds can and do get along with cats and small animals. If they dont test well with my cat they simply will be re homed with a family with no cats or plan to get cats. With the children there are to many variables to put a blanket decision on all the dogs. My kids were raised around rescue so they know the ins and outs, they love it and do understand that sometimes we can get a dog that is too far gone to be helped.

I am not promising all sorts of stuff I am not trying to sell someone a bridge, I am dedicated to helping a wonderful breed through education and adoption.

I am sorry that some of you guys dont feel we will do a good job but you dont know myself or my dedication to rescue and rescue dogs. You are free to knock me back but I just hope that you understand not everyone is a cowboy type rescue and really do want to do the right thing and know how to go about it.

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lack of foster carers is what hold up the works - for all rescues.

So true. These two established groups have good systems and the more foster carers they have the more dogs they can place. The most efficient way for more greyhounds to be saved is to work with the groups who are doing it well and pool resources for promotion and administration.

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