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Greylvr

New Rescue

354 posts in this topic

Maddy   

I have never had a dog kill another persons pets but I am very aware of the dogs we put out there. In the case of Sm staffs we placed they couldnt have other small pets nor have neighbors that had cats or dogs on either side of them. The risk of another animal being hurt because I wasnt diligent just isnt worth it IMO

what happened if they moved?

Look at GAP and GSN closely. Might not be any need to reinvent the wheel. GAP are the only ones who can issue a green collar in Victoria.

And what if neighbours changed, bought a new pet, had someone to stay with a small pet and so on? I would consider such aggressive dogs - no matter what breed - to be unrehomable. They would be euthanased in my rescue - that would be the responsible thing to do because no matter how hard you may have tried, you are putting a very aggressive dog back into the community which is placing everyone else and their pets at risk.

I didn't see where Greylvr stated the dogs were actually aggressive though. If the dogs pass all testing but that requirement is still there just to be extra careful, I can see no issues with that. When we ("we" being greyhound rescuers in general) rehome non-cat safe greyhounds, we're taking a risk with cats that might belong to neighbours of the new owner and that is generally considered acceptable. Personally, it worries me and I advise aopters in that situation to supervise and muzzle for the first few days to give the cat a chance to learn of the new arrival in a way that is less likely to result in a dead cat.

Getting back to something Greytmate said..

Taking from a single trainer is not something I'd consider doing. I have a trainer whose dogs I really like (because they're always cat-safe and in beautiful condition) but I'd never turn down a dog from somewhere else. In fact, if we got two applications to surrender at the same time, I'd probably take the other dog first because the responsible trainer is more likely to be willing to hold a dog. I'd prefer to reward the better trainer by taking his dogs first but the sad reality is, that would result in more dogs ending up dead (and I think he understands this).

I can definitely understand prefering to source intakes from a trusted individual but as greytmate points out, there are definitely implications there so it's something to think about very carefully as essentially, you're turning yourself into a private rehoming service for one trainer (rather than a rescue).

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Greylvr   

I have never had a dog kill another persons pets but I am very aware of the dogs we put out there. In the case of Sm staffs we placed they couldnt have other small pets nor have neighbors that had cats or dogs on either side of them. The risk of another animal being hurt because I wasnt diligent just isnt worth it IMO

what happened if they moved?

Look at GAP and GSN closely. Might not be any need to reinvent the wheel. GAP are the only ones who can issue a green collar in Victoria.

And what if neighbours changed, bought a new pet, had someone to stay with a small pet and so on? I would consider such aggressive dogs - no matter what breed - to be unrehomable. They would be euthanased in my rescue - that would be the responsible thing to do because no matter how hard you may have tried, you are putting a very aggressive dog back into the community which is placing everyone else and their pets at risk.

I didn't see where Greylvr stated the dogs were actually aggressive though. If the dogs pass all testing but that requirement is still there just to be extra careful, I can see no issues with that. When we ("we" being greyhound rescuers in general) rehome non-cat safe greyhounds, we're taking a risk with cats that might belong to neighbours of the new owner and that is generally considered acceptable. Personally, it worries me and I advise aopters in that situation to supervise and muzzle for the first few days to give the cat a chance to learn of the new arrival in a way that is less likely to result in a dead cat.

Getting back to something Greytmate said..

Taking from a single trainer is not something I'd consider doing. I have a trainer whose dogs I really like (because they're always cat-safe and in beautiful condition) but I'd never turn down a dog from somewhere else. In fact, if we got two applications to surrender at the same time, I'd probably take the other dog first because the responsible trainer is more likely to be willing to hold a dog. I'd prefer to reward the better trainer by taking his dogs first but the sad reality is, that would result in more dogs ending up dead (and I think he understands this).

I can definitely understand prefering to source intakes from a trusted individual but as greytmate points out, there are definitely implications there so it's something to think about very carefully as essentially, you're turning yourself into a private rehoming service for one trainer (rather than a rescue).

Ah yep very good point I dont plan to just take from this one trainer for ever, I was just planning on not taking owner surrenders, shelters etc just sticking to retired or injured track dogs. I just know how easy rescues can get over run by taking in any dog from anywhere and I think that if I can narrow it down to just track dogs it will help us to stay focused on what we want to accomplish. Very good point on the responsible trainer thought. I plan to get to know other trainers and through this 1 trainer like they said they have friends who will need help.

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Greylvr   
And what if neighbours changed, bought a new pet, had someone to stay with a small pet and so on? I would consider such aggressive dogs - no matter what breed - to be unrehomable. They would be euthanased in my rescue - that would be the responsible thing to do because no matter how hard you may have tried, you are putting a very aggressive dog back into the community which is placing everyone else and their pets at risk.

Oh wow somehow I missed this part. I have never placed an aggressive dog ever in my life I had them put down. This was a precaution we took above and beyond all the testing we did. I am not sure where you got that we were re homing aggro dogs.

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And what if neighbours changed, bought a new pet, had someone to stay with a small pet and so on? I would consider such aggressive dogs - no matter what breed - to be unrehomable. They would be euthanased in my rescue - that would be the responsible thing to do because no matter how hard you may have tried, you are putting a very aggressive dog back into the community which is placing everyone else and their pets at risk.

Oh wow somehow I missed this part. I have never placed an aggressive dog ever in my life I had them put down. This was a precaution we took above and beyond all the testing we did. I am not sure where you got that we were re homing aggro dogs.

That level of restriction on new owners raises the question of how aggressive the dog would be to require such total separation.

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Alkhe   

lack of foster carers is what hold up the works - for all rescues.

So true. These two established groups have good systems and the more foster carers they have the more dogs they can place. The most efficient way for more greyhounds to be saved is to work with the groups who are doing it well and pool resources for promotion and administration.

:thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

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Greylvr   
And what if neighbours changed, bought a new pet, had someone to stay with a small pet and so on? I would consider such aggressive dogs - no matter what breed - to be unrehomable. They would be euthanased in my rescue - that would be the responsible thing to do because no matter how hard you may have tried, you are putting a very aggressive dog back into the community which is placing everyone else and their pets at risk.

Oh wow somehow I missed this part. I have never placed an aggressive dog ever in my life I had them put down. This was a precaution we took above and beyond all the testing we did. I am not sure where you got that we were re homing aggro dogs.

That level of restriction on new owners raises the question of how aggressive the dog would be to require such total separation.

This is a breed that has been bred for many years to kill other animals, this is a breed that is very close to becoming extinct because people get them to look tough, society sees animal aggression and think that means they will be human aggressive. It was not a risk I wanted to take to negatively effect a whole breed and add fuel to the BSL fire because I wasnt careful in my placing of this breed.

we had rescues that were taking in this breed and telling people its how you raise them and if you dont abuse them they are fine, recommending they take their new dogs to the dog parks all these were very detrimental to the breed I know these rescues were trying to help but it was adding fuel to the fire when these people took these suggestions and their dogs hurt or killed another animal.

It wasnt a risk I was going to take there was nothing wrong with he dogs but the risk was there that it could get out of hand and the blame would be on the dog not the irresponsible owner. It worked for me and my rescue we never had an issue and I am happy with that. Maybe it wasnt needed the extra precaution but hey I never had a police officer on my door asking why I had placed a dog that has now hurt another animal or human. I am happy with my choices.

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Maddy   
And what if neighbours changed, bought a new pet, had someone to stay with a small pet and so on? I would consider such aggressive dogs - no matter what breed - to be unrehomable. They would be euthanased in my rescue - that would be the responsible thing to do because no matter how hard you may have tried, you are putting a very aggressive dog back into the community which is placing everyone else and their pets at risk.

Oh wow somehow I missed this part. I have never placed an aggressive dog ever in my life I had them put down. This was a precaution we took above and beyond all the testing we did. I am not sure where you got that we were re homing aggro dogs.

That level of restriction on new owners raises the question of how aggressive the dog would be to require such total separation.

I think you're being a little unfair here.

The OP has already stated the dogs were safe to rehome. The reasoning for such separation being reducing the risk of an accident that might negatively impact on the breed's reputation.

As I've pointed out, most greyhound rescues wouldn't consider such a rehoming policy despite the fact that we're placing cats at risk.

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I think you're being a little unfair here.

The OP has already stated the dogs were safe to rehome. The reasoning for such separation being reducing the risk of an accident that might negatively impact on the breed's reputation.

As I've pointed out, most greyhound rescues wouldn't consider such a rehoming policy despite the fact that we're placing cats at risk.

I'm looking at how these tough restrictions will be perceived by the public. I made no comment about the actual nature of the dog.

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Greylvr   

I think you're being a little unfair here.

The OP has already stated the dogs were safe to rehome. The reasoning for such separation being reducing the risk of an accident that might negatively impact on the breed's reputation.

As I've pointed out, most greyhound rescues wouldn't consider such a rehoming policy despite the fact that we're placing cats at risk.

I'm looking at how these tough restrictions will be perceived by the public. I made no comment about the actual nature of the dog.

Well when you educate people they tend to understand a lot more. I wasnt just saying this is how it is now go away I was explaining why, answering any questions they had. Am staffs, bit bulls and other bully breeds are not as easy to place responsibly as other breeds. Some people didnt like it but I am here for the dogs not to make people happy at the expense of the breed or dogs. There were plenty of other rescues that they could get a dog from.

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Maddy   

I think you're being a little unfair here.

The OP has already stated the dogs were safe to rehome. The reasoning for such separation being reducing the risk of an accident that might negatively impact on the breed's reputation.

As I've pointed out, most greyhound rescues wouldn't consider such a rehoming policy despite the fact that we're placing cats at risk.

I'm looking at how these tough restrictions will be perceived by the public. I made no comment about the actual nature of the dog.

I'm of the opinion that sugar-coating the potential risks a dog poses is not good for anyone. I'd also be very wary of adopting a dog out to someone who didn't fully understand what the breed was capable of.

Public perception is important but then, allowing the public to believe the breed is generally safe with cats is not going to do the breed any favours when people take risks that they wouldn't take if they been made fully aware of possible outcomes.

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tdierikx   
And what if neighbours changed, bought a new pet, had someone to stay with a small pet and so on? I would consider such aggressive dogs - no matter what breed - to be unrehomable. They would be euthanased in my rescue - that would be the responsible thing to do because no matter how hard you may have tried, you are putting a very aggressive dog back into the community which is placing everyone else and their pets at risk.

Oh wow somehow I missed this part. I have never placed an aggressive dog ever in my life I had them put down. This was a precaution we took above and beyond all the testing we did. I am not sure where you got that we were re homing aggro dogs.

In all fairness here, dogmad does have a little bit of bias against bull breeds that may chase/attack small animals. Some experiences she's had along the way haven't painted certain types of dogs in a great light. (Note to self: need to introduce her to my Rottie/Pittie cross girl for some positive experiences with a bull breed dog)

Seriously though, if you have to place so many restrictions on potential adopters of a dog, then maybe that dog shouldn't be rehomed at all? Especially in Victoria... err!

T.

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Greylvr   
And what if neighbours changed, bought a new pet, had someone to stay with a small pet and so on? I would consider such aggressive dogs - no matter what breed - to be unrehomable. They would be euthanased in my rescue - that would be the responsible thing to do because no matter how hard you may have tried, you are putting a very aggressive dog back into the community which is placing everyone else and their pets at risk.

Oh wow somehow I missed this part. I have never placed an aggressive dog ever in my life I had them put down. This was a precaution we took above and beyond all the testing we did. I am not sure where you got that we were re homing aggro dogs.

In all fairness here, dogmad does have a little bit of bias against bull breeds that may chase/attack small animals. Some experiences she's had along the way haven't painted certain types of dogs in a great light. (Note to self: need to introduce her to my Rottie/Pittie cross girl for some positive experiences with a bull breed dog)

Seriously though, if you have to place so many restrictions on potential adopters of a dog, then maybe that dog shouldn't be rehomed at all? Especially in Victoria... err!

T.

Sorry this wasnt in Victoria, and I am not rescuing bully breeds here in victoria.

Dogmad should not have had any bad experiences see this is where education is the key. 1 bad experience is enough to turn people off a breed this is why I was very diligent to educate and be super picky of where my dogs went.

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Rebanne   

lack of foster carers is what hold up the works - for all rescues.

will you have the same restrictions on the greyhounds as you did the amstaff's - owned home, no neighbours with other pets? What will you do with your rescue dog if it turns out not suitable with your kids or cat? Sometimes their true personality takes a while to shine through. What's your back up plan?

And I'm not a rescue, no competition to me, but I am very aware of how hard groups like GAP and GSN have had to fight for the greyhound and I am very cautious when someone new comes on the scene promising all sorts of stuff. Greyhounds have a lot to lose.

No I wont have the same restrictions on the greyhounds as we did on the Am Staffs. Many greyhounds can and do get along with cats and small animals. If they dont test well with my cat they simply will be re homed with a family with no cats or plan to get cats. With the children there are to many variables to put a blanket decision on all the dogs. My kids were raised around rescue so they know the ins and outs, they love it and do understand that sometimes we can get a dog that is too far gone to be helped.

As someone who has had greyhounds and cats living together for a few years now, fosters and owned, racebred and showbred, I am aware how quickly a dog can turn on a cat when it is seemingly ok. So I am curious on what your back up plan is if your foster greyhound proved non cat safe after a couple of weeks time; what will you do with it? You can't adopt it out to a non cat home if you don't already have one lined up, sometimes it takes months for the right home to turn up. So what of your poor cat?

I had a non cat safe dog here once for 3 days, was horrible for the dog, the cats, the people, but as I was a foster carer the dog was able to be moved on and made a wonderful pet for someone cat free.

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I think you're being a little unfair here.

The OP has already stated the dogs were safe to rehome. The reasoning for such separation being reducing the risk of an accident that might negatively impact on the breed's reputation.

As I've pointed out, most greyhound rescues wouldn't consider such a rehoming policy despite the fact that we're placing cats at risk.

I'm looking at how these tough restrictions will be perceived by the public. I made no comment about the actual nature of the dog.

I'm of the opinion that sugar-coating the potential risks a dog poses is not good for anyone. I'd also be very wary of adopting a dog out to someone who didn't fully understand what the breed was capable of.

Public perception is important but then, allowing the public to believe the breed is generally safe with cats is not going to do the breed any favours when people take risks that they wouldn't take if they been made fully aware of possible outcomes.

I have never heard of that level of restriction on adopters before and understand why it might be interpreted as the dog being unsafe. You are going way off topic now accusing others of sugar coating the truth because we find it unusual that so many harsh restrictions would be put on adopters.

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Greylvr   

lack of foster carers is what hold up the works - for all rescues.

will you have the same restrictions on the greyhounds as you did the amstaff's - owned home, no neighbours with other pets? What will you do with your rescue dog if it turns out not suitable with your kids or cat? Sometimes their true personality takes a while to shine through. What's your back up plan?

And I'm not a rescue, no competition to me, but I am very aware of how hard groups like GAP and GSN have had to fight for the greyhound and I am very cautious when someone new comes on the scene promising all sorts of stuff. Greyhounds have a lot to lose.

No I wont have the same restrictions on the greyhounds as we did on the Am Staffs. Many greyhounds can and do get along with cats and small animals. If they dont test well with my cat they simply will be re homed with a family with no cats or plan to get cats. With the children there are to many variables to put a blanket decision on all the dogs. My kids were raised around rescue so they know the ins and outs, they love it and do understand that sometimes we can get a dog that is too far gone to be helped.

As someone who has had greyhounds and cats living together for a few years now, fosters and owned, racebred and showbred, I am aware how quickly a dog can turn on a cat when it is seemingly ok. So I am curious on what your back up plan is if your foster greyhound proved non cat safe after a couple of weeks time; what will you do with it? You can't adopt it out to a non cat home if you don't already have one lined up, sometimes it takes months for the right home to turn up. So what of your poor cat?

I had a non cat safe dog here once for 3 days, was horrible for the dog, the cats, the people, but as I was a foster carer the dog was able to be moved on and made a wonderful pet for someone cat free.

The dog would come back if the adopter couldnt handle it. I have had dogs that would love to kill a cat in my rescue when I had a cat its doable not easy but doable and am prepared to deal with this. I had a cattle dog once that was feral for 5 years, put into a kennel and then got shipped to us.

He didnt like children or cats we assessed him and found that he was willing to learn he just didnt know anything from being wild. He did take a year in our care but turned out to be a beautiful well behaved dog. He was adopted out to a family and did very well never a problem but the owners who took him knew everything about him we held nothing back we never do we tell the adopters everything. We keep records of everything pertaining to health and behavior all this is passed on in a file with the dogs.

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Greylvr   

What kind of trainer have you got at your disposal and do you have an experience sighthound temp tester?

Actually I am a dog trainer did it as a business for some time. I am also trained by the HSUS in temp testing, and humane training took it when I worked for Animal Control. I have a lot of experience with dogs. I have worked as a vet tech for many years, have gone to college for vet tech so I am not just some run of the mill person who has no experience with dogs, dog behavior etc. I spend many years training dogs, working with aggressive dogs and their owners to make them safer and more under control. Not to say I will ever adopt out an aggressive dog but when you have people who need help with their dogs and you can help them that was my job.

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Maddy   

I think you're being a little unfair here.

The OP has already stated the dogs were safe to rehome. The reasoning for such separation being reducing the risk of an accident that might negatively impact on the breed's reputation.

As I've pointed out, most greyhound rescues wouldn't consider such a rehoming policy despite the fact that we're placing cats at risk.

I'm looking at how these tough restrictions will be perceived by the public. I made no comment about the actual nature of the dog.

I'm of the opinion that sugar-coating the potential risks a dog poses is not good for anyone. I'd also be very wary of adopting a dog out to someone who didn't fully understand what the breed was capable of.

Public perception is important but then, allowing the public to believe the breed is generally safe with cats is not going to do the breed any favours when people take risks that they wouldn't take if they been made fully aware of possible outcomes.

I have never heard of that level of restriction on adopters before and understand why it might be interpreted as the dog being unsafe. You are going way off topic now accusing others of sugar coating the truth because we find it unusual that so many harsh restrictions would be put on adopters.

If a greyhound isn't cat safe, placing it in a home where there are cats living next door is placing those cats are considerable risk, it's as simple as that. The fact is, those dogs are probably potentially very unsafe for neighbouring small animals but despite this risk, such placement it is considered acceptable. Public perception should never trump actual safety of animals.

As for the restriction being unusual.. it probably shouldn't be, given the risks we are taking with other peoples' animals.

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We are talking about a policy of no small pets at all and no small pets next door and being required to notify if moving. Aside from being unenforceable it hints at possible problems if a dog cannot even be kept safely next door to another dog ever.

There are many dangers for cats that stray, and there isn't a breed of dog that is guaranteed to accpt strange cats in their yard. All the responsible greyhound groups I know of will explain the risks to adopters and what can be done to minimise.

I'm not sure why you are still going off on this tangent. It would be safer if no big dogs were ever adopted out if you want to keep going down that path.

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Maddy   

We are talking about a policy of no small pets at all and no small pets next door and being required to notify if moving. Aside from being unenforceable it hints at possible problems if a dog cannot even be kept safely next door to another dog ever.

There are many dangers for cats that stray, and there isn't a breed of dog that is guaranteed to accpt strange cats in their yard. All the responsible greyhound groups I know of will explain the risks to adopters and what can be done to minimise.

I'm not sure why you are still going off on this tangent. It would be safer if no big dogs were ever adopted out if you want to keep going down that path.

You went off on this tangent to start with :shrug:

To be blunt here, this thread is beginning to feel like a typical Dol "welcome" thread. The sort of welcome that involves people jumping in to pick at the the OP once they see others doing it (I'm looking at you, MUP) and the usual "guilty until proven innocent" attitude.

This woman is looking to help and she's being treated like a pedophile applying for a job as a babysitter. Christ..

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