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mixeduppup

Breeding And Rescuing

95 posts in this topic

mita   

I also have issues with breeders that don't do good rehomings - ie an expensive purebred puppy going into a loft apartment with 2 owners who work fulltime and then have things on after work ... or a long lived breed puppy going to owners in their mid 70s, or a puppy being flown to a home with no fencing whose previous 3 dogs died on the road. Those are just a few examples, wouldn't want to bore anyone.

Working at the pointy end of rescue, you would come across the casualties from the pointy end of breeders' rehoming of dogs that didn't work out for all sorts of reasons.

Again, it's a matter of risk reduction. And, even tho' breeders (or anyone else) can't predict the future with accuracy, they can make a call based on estimating degree of risk in a particular situation. In fact, they have a welfare responsibility to do so.

Just the same as anyone doing rehoming. .... rescue person, private pet owner.

These are individual behaviours and can't be said to represent an entire group.

At the other end are breeders like the one of whom a pet adopter said (tongue in cheek), 'I had to go thro' more hoops than when I adopted a child.' But the adopter saw it as positive, reflecting how the breeder valued her dogs.

Similar attitude comes from the 'good' rescuers.

So your point about the importance of making a risk assessment call before rehoming, is a fair one. But care needs to be taken not to over-generalise to an entire group from worst case examples ( not that I'm saying you're doing this).

Edited by mita

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tdierikx   

I'm more of the opinion that each rehoming needs to be looked at on an individual basis - how the actual rescue dog will fit with the prospective owner, their other dogs, other pets, or children, if any, and the lifestyle led by the prospective adopter - using blanket "bans" on any one of those things seems to me that we may be cutting off our noses to spite our faces, and the dog may be missing out on a very good home indeed.

Personally, I work fulltime and have 4 permanent dogs of my own (all bitches) - some rescues would deny me adopting from them due to the fact that they may think I'm not up for the time and energy required to give "their" dog the love and attention it needs... yet the rescue I'm with happily allows me to foster groups of pups, and I don't seem to have any issues giving both them AND my own dogs exactly what they need... go figure?

T.

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mita   

I'm more of the opinion that each rehoming needs to be looked at on an individual basis - how the actual rescue dog will fit with the prospective owner, their other dogs, other pets, or children, if any, and the lifestyle led by the prospective adopter - using blanket "bans" on any one of those things seems to me that we may be cutting off our noses to spite our faces, and the dog may be missing out on a very good home indeed.

Which is what risk assessment is. It's assessment of risk in particular circumstances.

But even with the best judgment call possible, based on that, we still can't predict the future with certainty. And something can still go pear-shaped in a rehoming. But 'good risk' assessment should at least decrease that possibility. And, conversely, increase the chances of homes working out.

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I am not making out that entire dogs are monsters - not sure how anyone would read that into my simple statement that it is about the behaviours of BOTH dogs - the desexed and undesexed.

I've worked in rescue (including pounds and shelters) for over 15 years.

I've seen an undesexed male dog come into a shelter and be placed with other dogs. I've seen them brought to the dog park and be placed amongst other dogs. For the most part they were nice natured dogs - it was the other dogs (the desexed ones) that had a go at them.

I've had a lot of undesexed dogs amongst my own dogs - waiting to get to the vet for all their work to be done.

Some of my dogs have been fine with it, some of them haven't.

When a bitch has come on heat, it has caused fights amongst SOME of my male dogs.

I personally do look at individual cases but I certainly don't blame any rescue group who makes a policy because I know why it is.

Just because someone has a show dog, it doesn't make them an expert either, they have got one dog that they show not necessarily years of experience with multiple dogs and multiple kinds of dog under all sorts of circumstances.

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D'smum   

I've met "show" breeders and "rescuers" that i wouldnt entrust with the care of my houseplants. You simply cant judge the suitability of an owner by one aspect of their lives.

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exkiwi   

When our local SPCA rescued a lot of in whelp bitchs from a local puppy mill I offered to foster a couple for them but was refused on the basis that I was a breeder and had other entire dogs. I can't see how that decision was for the benefit of those poor dogs which were left to whelp unattended in kennels surrounded by other dogs instead of tucked away safely in my purpose built facilities

Similar to me when I offered a home to a surrendered Sheltie. Despite having had this breed for 40+ years I was deemed not a suitable person to own one.

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Steph M   

You do see a lot of the 'Don't breed or buy while shelter pets die' etc and it's so guilt inducing, we're in conversation with a lovely breeder and have our fingers/various other appendages crossed time and time again that we are granted a puppy, but the propoganda makes me feel awful and it's like I'm doing something shameful!

Personally we have our reasons and I know we're more than responsible, but the propaganda makes me feel horrible. I've hidden one friend on Facebook because she posts so much of it, and is very holier than thou with her DA pound rescued Staffy x, which sounds really nasty of me but it's a few a day of the 'your new puppy just killed this puppy' graphic photos.

There needs to be a swing to the positive of the fabulous breeders who home puppies appropriately and responsibly and work their bums off in rescue on the side, rather than this shaming that goes on while BYB's get off scot free, take their few hundred dollars per puppy and don't pay much mind to where it may end up.

Infuriating, must be worse from an inside POV.

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mita   

There needs to be a swing to the positive of the fabulous breeders who home puppies appropriately and responsibly and work their bums off in rescue on the side, rather than this shaming that goes on while BYB's get off scot free, take their few hundred dollars per puppy and don't pay much mind to where it may end up.

Agree.

The people with their shallow slogans about how adopting a p/b dog 'kills' a shelter dog, have no idea that good ethical breeders are up the prevention end of dogs being dumped. Just as good rescues are at the saving end of dumped dogs.

I like how the Australian Consumers Association (CHOICE) website guidelines for getting a puppy/dog, point people towards both registered breeders & rescue sources. Both work for the welfare of dogs.

Trouble is that slick, emotive slogans that no one thinks thro', spread like wildfire.

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Steph M   

They really do, a clever marketing campaign indeed, albeit a very shortsighted one.

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D'smum   

Hmmm. Several years ago, i had a DA pound rescue staffy x. I now (through hard work and training) have a sweet tolerant (previously DA) staffy x that enables me to foster dog after dog (yep, even purebreeds) with his lovely tolerant nature.

Dont knock the pound adoptees and i wont knock your pedigrees. Sounds fair to me. Extremists at either end are not useful. A dog is a dog to me.

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Steph M   

I have nothing against her or her dog, I think rescuing is a lovely thing to do, but I resent being made to feel like I am a horrible person for my choices, and that somehow the only right way is way X.

Sorry to be so offensive, it was certainly not meant that way, just out of frustration more than anything. I have no doubt your dog is a gem, and a lucky guy at that :)

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Rebanne   

Hmmm. Several years ago, i had a DA pound rescue staffy x. I now (through hard work and training) have a sweet tolerant (previously DA) staffy x that enables me to foster dog after dog (yep, even purebreeds) with his lovely tolerant nature.

Dont knock the pound adoptees and i wont knock your pedigrees. Sounds fair to me. Extremists at either end are not useful. A dog is a dog to me.

No one was knocking pound dogs, just the incrediblely inaccurate marketing campaign used by some. Plus this is a purebred forum first and foremost so I certainly hope you don't knock our pedigrees.

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Sheridan   

Hmmm. Several years ago, i had a DA pound rescue staffy x. I now (through hard work and training) have a sweet tolerant (previously DA) staffy x that enables me to foster dog after dog (yep, even purebreeds) with his lovely tolerant nature.

Dont knock the pound adoptees and i wont knock your pedigrees. Sounds fair to me. Extremists at either end are not useful. A dog is a dog to me.

Who knocked pound dogs?

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Steph M   

I think that was me, inadvertently. I genuinely didn't mean to at all, most of the dogs we've ever had have been sweet as pie and dearly loved ex-poundies. I was conveying frustration with a friend who pushed the PETA propaganda had a reactive staffy x from the pound and liked to lord that above anyone who dares have a purebreed.

Using that to state the availability of such propaganda, nothing against her or the dog, just that with such rife and easily accessible information, anyone could get swept up and carried away.

Again, genuine apologies for any offence :)

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D'smum   

No offence taken whatsoever, Steph. What i said was more a statement that it shouldnt matter and no-one really has the right to knock anyone else's choice of purebreed or rescue. But wow...some people do take forum life very seriously dont they? Never had any intention of knocking purebreed dogs, nor have i or will i ever. But point taken...i'll take my common pound dog and try to be seen and not heard. Cheers.

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