Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Zereuloh

Dog Shot At Wendouree Home

276 posts in this topic

Zereuloh   

http://www.thecourier.com.au/story/1749179/police-shoot-and-kill-dog-at-wendouree-home/?cs=61

WENDOUREE residents are outraged today after the shooting of a pet Bullmastiff dog by police at a house in Willow Grove.

Police said two members attended a Wendouree West property at 8.55am this morning to make inquiries in regards to an investigation.

WARNING: This story contains photos readers may find distressing

Ballarat North Sergeant Nathan Gardiner said the members went through the front gate and were half way up the Willow Grove driveway when the dog allegedly ran out the front door in a "threatening manner".

"A police member was forced to take protective action and fire one shot," Sergeant Gardiner said.

"The member was fearful of being attacked.

"Police are conducting an investigation into the circumstances in accordance with Victoria police policy and reasonable force provisions."

Sergeant Gardiner said that offers were made to move the dog's body out of sight, but were declined.

A blood stain indicates the dog was halfway down the driveway when it was shot.

The dog's body has been viewed by The Courier and the bullet entered the back of its neck.

Jessica Williams, who lives across the road, was walking out of her front door to take her young children to school about 8.58am when the shooting occurred.

"I saw the coppers walk up and the dog hadn't even left the yard," Ms Williams said.

"They didn't say 'put the dog away' or anything. We just heard a bang and then we saw the dog just lying on the ground."

Owner Caroline Elliott has mental health issues and said she was dependent on six-year-old Bruiser's company.

"I got nothing now, he was everything to me," a teary Ms Elliott said.

"I can't understand, in the whole time he has been here he has never bitten anyone. They shot him in my own driveway."

Renee Fraser, who is the partner of Mrs Elliott's son Craig, said Bruiser was registered and had never been aggressive in the past.

"It's wrong. They just shot him," Ms Fraser said.

Mrs Elliot's daughter Nyleakah said she and her father, who has recently had a heart attack, were left to move Bruiser from the driveway to the front garden and cover him with a blanket to avoid further upset to her mother and children in the house.

"Everyone in this street knows our dog. That's got to say something," Ms Elliot said, pointing to the crowd who had gathered outside their house to mourn Bruiser.

"He was so docile. There was no reason to kill him."

Ms Elliot held grave concerns for her mother's welfare.

"When my mum feels like killing herself, Bruiser isn't going to be there for her."

When police returned to the house, both Ms Fraser and Ms Elliott demanded answers as to why Bruiser had been shot.

When police said Bruiser had attacked a member, Ms Fraser said: "You can protect them but we've got a dead dog."

Ms Elliott said her father had asked police why Bruiser had been shot and was told: "It scared me."

"Bruiser had to have been turned away to be shot like that and when I felt his body, he wasn't tense at all," Ms Elliott.

"He's never attacked anyone. He'd lick you to death first.

"He growls and barks and that but that's all he would do."

Ballarat City Council said there was no record of complaints or incidents filed against Bruiser.

Edited by Zereuloh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Poor dog ... sounds like he was a real lifeline for his owner as well :( . Bit scary they can do that when he was in his own yard.

On a side not, when did police officers start to be called "members" ... weird.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"He growls and barks and that but that's all he would do."

Sorry but for most people a bullmastiff running towards them barking and growling is enough of a threat, no matter how harmless the dog....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RuralPug   

The Police Association has always called them members, and some service police have that habit also. "Officer" seems sort of American to me, I guess it depends on the usage in your state. The article says that there is an investigation happening into this incident.

What it doesn't say it what the investigation was that the police were at that address in relation to - I wonder if it was something to do with hard crime and if that is why the police were so nervous that a gun was drawn and the poor hapless dog shot? Not that that is any excuse.

No doubt there are a lot of decent people living in Wendouree but it does have more than its fair share of criminals and bogans. I really wonder that if it was a more affluent suburb and a large dog had rushed barking out the front door whether the same thing would have happened? I suppose we will never know.

RIP poor dog. frown.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sue   

Sorry but for most people a bullmastiff running towards them barking and growling is enough of a threat, no matter how harmless the dog....

Have to agree. A barking, rushing bullmastiff is enough to scare anyone. I'm sure the police weren't there to hand out lollies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zereuloh   

yes a barking bullmastiff can be perceived as a threat. However, your a stranger, coming onto his property ALOT of dogs, regardless of size are going to do this. Secondly the article said the dog was shot in the back of the neck which would make me question wether or not the dog was actually moving TOWARD the officer like they claimed. Def hope there is an investigation into this. So awful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BlackJaq   

yes a barking bullmastiff can be perceived as a threat. However, your a stranger, coming onto his property ALOT of dogs, regardless of size are going to do this. Secondly the article said the dog was shot in the back of the neck which would make me question wether or not the dog was actually moving TOWARD the officer like they claimed. Def hope there is an investigation into this. So awful.

I noticed this also and if true, then I do not believe there was any justification for shooting the dog. What, was it rushing at them backwards?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yes a barking bullmastiff can be perceived as a threat. However, your a stranger, coming onto his property ALOT of dogs, regardless of size are going to do this. Secondly the article said the dog was shot in the back of the neck which would make me question wether or not the dog was actually moving TOWARD the officer like they claimed. Def hope there is an investigation into this. So awful.

I noticed this also and if true, then I do not believe there was any justification for shooting the dog. What, was it rushing at them backwards?

Bullet trajectory is a tricky thing. If the officer was taller than the dog and aimed down that could explain back of the neck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yes a barking bullmastiff can be perceived as a threat. However, your a stranger, coming onto his property ALOT of dogs, regardless of size are going to do this. Secondly the article said the dog was shot in the back of the neck which would make me question wether or not the dog was actually moving TOWARD the officer like they claimed. Def hope there is an investigation into this. So awful.

And so totally preventable. A closed door, side fences....

People should be able to reach your front door without being rushed by your dog/s.

The only good that can come from this is that people start to contain their dogs better. People aren't mind readers - they aren't to know that your rushing barking 50 kilo plus dog is going to pull up at the last second.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends on who those 'people' are. There are some 'people' who I'm just not comfortable with having easy access to my front door!

S

Edited by Sheilaheel02

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
frufru   

A police officer (or anyone else) should be able to reach your front door without running the gauntlet of a dog that may or may not be friendly.

Well, S, you can choose not to answer the door if it is someone you don't wish to interact with but access to your property is part of living in a community and is often for your own benefit

Edited by frufru

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends on who those 'people' are. There are some 'people' who I'm just not comfortable with having easy access to my front door!

S

For ordinary members of the public, that means you need to formally revoke permission to enter and, I would argue put up a "Beware of the Dog" sign to warn people that a dog is on the property.

A locked gate isn't a bad idea either. But if there are no warning signs and/or people with a right to enter exercise it, then a charging dog may end up in trouble.

And there are quite a few people who will have a right to enter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HW, I do formally revoke the right for the general public to enter my property uninvited. The front gate is indeed chained and locked and the top gate has a sign stating there are dogs on the property (not beware of the dog which I believe is an admission that you have a dog that may be a threat). I am getting a new sign made up that says something along the lines of one I saw at a friends place: Multi-dog household, please wait outside gate, sound horn and wait for owner.

FruFru, I take your point that I am making it harder for emergency services etc to enter my property, however, that is a risk I've decided to live with. Whether others consider me part of the community or not doesn't bother me quite frankly, anyone I want here knows exactly how to get in. If someone is already at my front door they are well inside the perimeter of my property.

It's an informed decision based on personal experience, location and trusted advice.

S

Edited by Sheilaheel02

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alyosha   

The story is sad but raises lots of questions.

The back of the dog's neck is visible in the photo and there is no obvious wound there...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe I need a Private Property, Keep Out sign too for the terminally stupid people that think it's OK to drive up my neighbours driveway and jump the side fence instead of ringing or texting me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very sad frown.gif, these things get to me, just because someone in a blue uniform feels scared or intimidated they whip out a gun and kill frown.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The story is sad but raises lots of questions.

The back of the dog's neck is visible in the photo and there is no obvious wound there...

entry wounds can be very small and easily covered by a skin fold/hair ruff....they are only the size of the projectile , usually .

The exit wound would be a bit larger, and probably messier .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×