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mixeduppup

Need Statistics On Dog Dumped During And Post-christmas

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Can anyone help me find reliable Australian statistics of dogs dumped during and post-christmas? Or point me to someone who may be able to help? Thanks

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Guest Ams   
Guest Ams

RSPCA publishes statistics every year but it is annual statistics State by State. If you gave them a call and explained what you wanted and why they may be inclined to give you a breakdown of their figures into pre and post Xmas. It is information they have released anyway so there should be no need for a Freedom of Information application.

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RSPCA publishes statistics every year but it is annual statistics State by State. If you gave them a call and explained what you wanted and why they may be inclined to give you a breakdown of their figures into pre and post Xmas. It is information they have released anyway so there should be no need for a Freedom of Information application.

Thanks I just called and she said there wasn't any way she could give me a break down without contacting someone that was currently on holidays, but she said some things that she says are OK for me to use and site the RSPCA as the source so it should be OK. Thanks

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efowler   

DLG can provide a comprehensive spreadsheet on all NSW council impound facilities data. It is broken down by council facility, month, number arrives, number leaves, adopted, euthanised, etc etc.

I obtained a copy whilst doing my honours and would have looked at seasonal differences but ran out if time. They do publish a summary of this yearly. Otherwise you may have to email and request it.

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Steve   

Funny you should ask.

http://blackhobyah.n...istmas-dumping/

The DLG stats are images, if you click on them you'll see large versions and there's a link to the originals in the references.

How do I find out who wrote this - looks to me that its worth a nomination

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the rise isn't always at christmas, around easter when the puppies and kittens are no longer cute that when the dumping starts

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gwp4me   

Can't find stats for South Coast NSW pounds ( Moruya area). Canberra stats would be interesting, too, as each year - the big exodus down the coast starts around Christmas time. :(

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Nic.B   

the rise isn't always at christmas, around easter when the puppies and kittens are no longer cute that when the dumping starts

I agree, the easter holidays dont help either :(

In all the years I was involved there was an insane amount of surrenders at christmas. One day 17 dogs were surrendered before luchtime. There were times we had dogs in overnight pens, and in the excercise runs while other dogs were transported out. You would get five out and 12 would come in.

I do think other factors at christmas impact.

Rescues are often full to overflowing, staff have leave, volunteers have leave and the opening hours at shelters are often only an hour or so in the morning for cleaning and feeding.

Hard to adopt when the shelter is not open and even when open the hours are 7am - 9am

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I've been reading about this recently too and thought this post was also worth mentioning as I so often feel disheartened about all the negative stuff, but good will overcome evil and there really is more of us good guys.

http://blackhobyah.net/multiplied-me/

So let’s pick up on Shel’s last comment that the good people in the community make up 100 times over for any bad people. It turns out that she’s pretty much exactly right, and to prove it, I’ve done some calculations.

As at 11.14 am on the 13/11/2011 Australia’s population was 22,789,387. If we assume that the figure of 250,000 companion animals killed in pounds every year is basically accurate (we don’t know for sure, there are no really good statistics nation-wide) then let’s do some calculations based on another assumption, that there is a one-to-one relationship between each of those 250,000 animals and a human being. If we run the figures, it turns out that 250,000 is about one percent of the total population of Australia, so the reality is that only 1 in every 92 people in Australia is the “irresponsible public”.

The other 91 people are amongst the animal loving population of Australia who “spend almost $1500 a year on their pets, outstripping many other average annual household costs, including electricity ($1440), eating out ($1460), alcohol ($1040) and public transport ($260). In 2010-11 Australians spent almost $796 million on buying pets, $2.8 billion dollars on pet food, $2.1 billion on vet bills and around 1.1 billion on professional services including grooming, boarding and training. http://www.news.com.au/money/money-matters/australians-spending-up-on-pets/story-e6frfmd9-1226151433811#ixzz1gNJZ73ei

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minimax   

I've been reading about this recently too and thought this post was also worth mentioning as I so often feel disheartened about all the negative stuff, but good will overcome evil and there really is more of us good guys.

http://blackhobyah.net/multiplied-me/

So let’s pick up on Shel’s last comment that the good people in the community make up 100 times over for any bad people. It turns out that she’s pretty much exactly right, and to prove it, I’ve done some calculations.

As at 11.14 am on the 13/11/2011 Australia’s population was 22,789,387. If we assume that the figure of 250,000 companion animals killed in pounds every year is basically accurate (we don’t know for sure, there are no really good statistics nation-wide) then let’s do some calculations based on another assumption, that there is a one-to-one relationship between each of those 250,000 animals and a human being. If we run the figures, it turns out that 250,000 is about one percent of the total population of Australia, so the reality is that only 1 in every 92 people in Australia is the “irresponsible public”.

The other 91 people are amongst the animal loving population of Australia who “spend almost $1500 a year on their pets, outstripping many other average annual household costs, including electricity ($1440), eating out ($1460), alcohol ($1040) and public transport ($260). In 2010-11 Australians spent almost $796 million on buying pets, $2.8 billion dollars on pet food, $2.1 billion on vet bills and around 1.1 billion on professional services including grooming, boarding and training. http://www.news.com.au/money/money-matters/australians-spending-up-on-pets/story-e6frfmd9-1226151433811#ixzz1gNJZ73ei

Unfortunately those pretty statistics don't stop dogs being dumped, nor do they help those dogs. It just glosses over the "bad stuff" and says "but look, good stuff happens which means the bad stuff doesn't really matter".

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Leema   

Dogs end up in shelters for a variety of reasons. This is only a small percentage of pets compared to the rest of the dogs that stay in homes.

The media in the past tend to spin dogs in shelters in a very negative way. Promoting the idea that most people are good is a good idea. Good people adopt animals from shelters, or foster, or donate. We don't want to get good people off side because of a few.

There's enough homes for dogs in Australia. We need to get beyond the overpopulation myth and start being proactive. And being positive is part of being proactive.

http://leemakennels.com/blog/rescue/are-you-willing-to-be-wrong-about-that/

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