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DaneLover233

Calling All Great Dane Folks!

60 posts in this topic

Our Dane is 7 months old now and pretty much everything that has been said above is as it is.

Our lounge has been taken over by a Dane. The kitchen bench(which has been untouched by the Bulldogs) is no longer safe with a Dane. I have lost count as to how many times my feet have been stood on. They are an extremely intelligent breed and definitely require extensive training.

We feed Canidae (Bulldogs and Mr Princess the Dane)

He was taught from the age of 3 months old that he MUST wait until he is given the OK to have his dinner. His food bowl is always raised(as he grows) and he is being taught manners and learns very quickly. He loves the speak up command also! We also do hand signals with training as well as voice commands which he has quickly learnt.

post-27080-0-48319600-1390994070_thumb.jpg

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dididog   

Our Dane is 7 months old now and pretty much everything that has been said above is as it is.

Our lounge has been taken over by a Dane. The kitchen bench(which has been untouched by the Bulldogs) is no longer safe with a Dane. I have lost count as to how many times my feet have been stood on. They are an extremely intelligent breed and definitely require extensive training.

We feed Canidae (Bulldogs and Mr Princess the Dane)

He was taught from the age of 3 months old that he MUST wait until he is given the OK to have his dinner. His food bowl is always raised(as he grows) and he is being taught manners and learns very quickly. He loves the speak up command also! We also do hand signals with training as well as voice commands which he has quickly learnt.

He has such a pretty face!

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Probably hard to do with a doggy with such long legs but can I put in a request that you do your best to train him not to stand with his paws on the TOP of the fence and bark at people walking past, it really freaks my dogs out when our neighbourhood dane does that! :laugh:

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Pheebs   

Probably hard to do with a doggy with such long legs but can I put in a request that you do your best to train him not to stand with his paws on the TOP of the fence and bark at people walking past, it really freaks my dogs out when our neighbourhood dane does that! :laugh:

You mean like this? :o

post-1327-0-65487900-1390996307_thumb.jpg

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Yes but this girls whole head comes right over the fence so she can bark really well at anyone going past. It's actually pretty frustrating if I'll be honest, if she just poked her head up for a look it'd be OK but she barks quite aggressively at anyone that walks past. I'm told she's a lovely dog and I'm sure she is but she's certainly a good guard dog too! She's a stunner as well. :)

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Danois   

Danes are great for protecting the ones they love - not what I would call a guard dog in the usual sense.

Come to my house and you will get a barrelling bark and it made known you are being watched. If we are here then all is good. If we are not then well good luck...

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Danes are great for protecting the ones they love - not what I would call a guard dog in the usual sense.

Come to my house and you will get a barrelling bark and it made known you are being watched. If we are here then all is good. If we are not then well good luck...

Yep my boy will bark and carry on, until you call his name and he knows whom you are if someone comes over. I feel safe knowing this as hubby will be going away shortly and i know I'm safe with obi here

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Hi there & Welcome

Apart from doubling up on what Danios has told you already, my 2 cents worth are…….

Apart from researching breeders, once you have picked one your happy with arrange to go and visit, meet their current danes and get a feel for what their's are like.. Forming a relationship now with a breeder is greåt.

Drool towels are a must to have everywhere..

everything is more expensive as they need so much more, so be prepared

Lol at the drool towel comment!

We plan on getting insurance for the dog too - does anyone have any preferred insurers?

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I will speak only from personal experience (dons flame suit).

We have a Blue Female who will be 5 in June. We've had her since 8wks of age and bought her from a registered breeder.

I adore this dog with my everything, but she is incredibly hard work. Yes, there are "gentle giants" out there, but there are also those that defy logic and many who have met my girl describe her as "broken" :laugh:

I have had consultations with a few behaviourists who have described her as having a "f*** you" mentality.

In fairness, I would also comment that she is the way she is as a result of both nature and nurture (I fell ill about 9 months after we adopted her so she definitely sees me as a bit of a weak target but would walk all over anyone really given the chance).

I would (as has previously been advised in this thread) again strongly recommend meeting with your breeder of choice and meeting their dogs to see what they are like both in conformation and temperament. I know I'm biased but I feel she is an incredibly beautiful dog but very much bred for beauty, not brains or temperament. Please don't get me wrong - she can be incredibly smoochy, sweet and loving but at best she is highly strung, weak nerved, reactive (and please take this in the way in which its intended as I mean no offence to anyone) she has been described as being "autistic" and you never really feel like she connects with you (or anyone for that matter).

I would also strongly urge that you ask the hard questions of any prospective breeder re: the incidence of bloat in their lines.

In sum? They are a truly remarkable and special breed but I'm comforted that you're doing your research now as purchasing from a Registered Breeder only gets you so far :laugh:

Thanks so much for such an honest opinion, I guess with any breed you can get a "broken" one, it just requires more work!

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You just pick the wrong colour dogs GDG - black dog here and no slobber lol!

You make a really good point Pheebs - making sure that you get the right temperament for you. Boo is an incredibly easy dog to live with now but by golly we had our moments when he was younger - harassing the cat when he was ill, shut down behaviour etc etc - there were tears, an impassioned plea (which got ignored) for a friend to come and take him, a consult with K9 Pro and heaps of advice from experienced Dane people.

I had a puppy that had a soft temperament and some anxiety. I had to over socialise and I pay the price for that today as he does have a high value for other dogs but will recall away.

I have also learnt that he is the perfect obedience/ rally o dog at home but training has way too many distractions for him and I can't get him to focus for love nor money nor roast chicken!

My other piece of advice - never ever ever let them learn was ice cream is...there is no coming back from that one!

Hahahahaha you're killing me!

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You just pick the wrong colour dogs GDG - black dog here and no slobber lol!

:rofl: :rofl: :rofl: dead right there

Danelover233… I've attached a pic of my current boy. he's 2 weeks shy of 9mths.

he's lovely, nawty, and cheeky, but my god i love him. Previous to him i owned his 2 great grandfathers…. I'm a sucker for Harlequins & Mantles ( Spots & Tuxedos ) :laugh:

IMG_5510_zps7b7de857.jpg

Oh my god he's freaking gorgeous!!!! Im a harle/merle girl myself...my hubby wanted a blue originally but then I showed him the harlequins and he's obsessed...can I just borrow this guy for a cuddle pretty please!!! Feel free to spam with photos haha

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Our Dane is 7 months old now and pretty much everything that has been said above is as it is.

Our lounge has been taken over by a Dane. The kitchen bench(which has been untouched by the Bulldogs) is no longer safe with a Dane. I have lost count as to how many times my feet have been stood on. They are an extremely intelligent breed and definitely require extensive training.

We feed Canidae (Bulldogs and Mr Princess the Dane)

He was taught from the age of 3 months old that he MUST wait until he is given the OK to have his dinner. His food bowl is always raised(as he grows) and he is being taught manners and learns very quickly. He loves the speak up command also! We also do hand signals with training as well as voice commands which he has quickly learnt.

I've only just heard about Canidae, we currently feed our boxer and chi Blackhawk but I am interested to find a local supplier and check it out or get a sample or something

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Probably hard to do with a doggy with such long legs but can I put in a request that you do your best to train him not to stand with his paws on the TOP of the fence and bark at people walking past, it really freaks my dogs out when our neighbourhood dane does that! :laugh:

Hahaha ok, I can do that - we have a 6ft fence and a double gate so shouldn't be a problem :)

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sas   

Our Dane is 7 months old now and pretty much everything that has been said above is as it is.

Our lounge has been taken over by a Dane. The kitchen bench(which has been untouched by the Bulldogs) is no longer safe with a Dane. I have lost count as to how many times my feet have been stood on. They are an extremely intelligent breed and definitely require extensive training.

We feed Canidae (Bulldogs and Mr Princess the Dane)

He was taught from the age of 3 months old that he MUST wait until he is given the OK to have his dinner. His food bowl is always raised(as he grows) and he is being taught manners and learns very quickly. He loves the speak up command also! We also do hand signals with training as well as voice commands which he has quickly learnt.

And we have his brother te he he

We also feed Canidae All Life Stages.

My recommendations, check out this if you haven't already: http://www.greatdanerescue.com.au/Docs/Love%20is%20a%20Great%20Dane.pdf

Not all breeders are created the same regardless of if they are registered or not - it takes time and patience and open eyes to find a good breeder.

In Rescue and also just viewing the online Dane Groups we can see that the breed is suffering in temperament mostly from nervy dogs that become fear aggressive so avoid Backyard breeders and make no excuses for the temperaments of Mum/Dad/Siblings.

post-4036-0-49603500-1391043834_thumb.jpg

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sas   

Our Dane is 7 months old now and pretty much everything that has been said above is as it is.

Our lounge has been taken over by a Dane. The kitchen bench(which has been untouched by the Bulldogs) is no longer safe with a Dane. I have lost count as to how many times my feet have been stood on. They are an extremely intelligent breed and definitely require extensive training.

We feed Canidae (Bulldogs and Mr Princess the Dane)

He was taught from the age of 3 months old that he MUST wait until he is given the OK to have his dinner. His food bowl is always raised(as he grows) and he is being taught manners and learns very quickly. He loves the speak up command also! We also do hand signals with training as well as voice commands which he has quickly learnt.

I've only just heard about Canidae, we currently feed our boxer and chi Blackhawk but I am interested to find a local supplier and check it out or get a sample or something

Canidae have the highest quality ingredients for any Dane puppy kibble you will find (suitable phos:calc ratios).

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Steph M   

Check out how many litters each breeder is having HERE

ooh wow interesting.

I wish there were more info like this available in such a fab format!

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raineth   

Oh you've got some great advice so far Danelover123 :)

You can't research breeders enough I reckon. And I want to reiterate what everyone else has said regarding finding a good breeder. As GDG said, it is also good to go and visit the breeder and their dogs if at all possible. This allows you to see things for yourself, such as how the dogs respond to visitors, as well as their living conditions and all that important stuff.

I don't have a huge amount of experience, as I am only onto my second Dane. But from what I can see there is a fair amount of variation in the breed when it comes to prey drive, energy levels, and aloofness. So you may wish to ask breeders about these things also.

My first Dane had fairly low prey drive, very low energy and was very aloof. My second Dane is pretty much the opposite of that! Some are also a lot more destructo than others. My girl went through a brief destructo phase when she was about 16 months but has been good ever since really. But I've heard of Danes eating whole couches and that sort of thing! They also vary in how much guarding instinct they have. My girl never even barks when someone knocks on the door :) that suits me really well, I like that.

They love their stuffed toys soooo much!

They do love being on your bed and lounge. Although I am a meany and they are not allowed. Del is only allowed on the bed if she brings me presents, which she does at least once a day haha.

You will end up with a preoccupation with finding good quality dog beds that are durable, comfortable, affordable... And big enough!

They shed a lot unfortunately.

They are usually fairly retarded when it comes to swimming.

It's a good idea to teach them to lie down when greeting small dogs :)

They often love just hanging out with you, and joining in with what you're doing.

Because of their reach, a 'leave that alone command' will be one of the best things you teach them :)

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raineth   

Oh one more important thing... You will never wear nice clothes again :laugh:

Ok not really... But since Dane ownership all my clothes are divided into two very distinct categories: those to be covered in hair and slobber, and those that I put on five minutes before I need to be seen by the general public.

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Our Dane is 7 months old now and pretty much everything that has been said above is as it is.

Our lounge has been taken over by a Dane. The kitchen bench(which has been untouched by the Bulldogs) is no longer safe with a Dane. I have lost count as to how many times my feet have been stood on. They are an extremely intelligent breed and definitely require extensive training.

We feed Canidae (Bulldogs and Mr Princess the Dane)

He was taught from the age of 3 months old that he MUST wait until he is given the OK to have his dinner. His food bowl is always raised(as he grows) and he is being taught manners and learns very quickly. He loves the speak up command also! We also do hand signals with training as well as voice commands which he has quickly learnt.

And we have his brother te he he

We also feed Canidae All Life Stages.

My recommendations, check out this if you haven't already: http://www.greatdanerescue.com.au/Docs/Love%20is%20a%20Great%20Dane.pdf

Not all breeders are created the same regardless of if they are registered or not - it takes time and patience and open eyes to find a good breeder.

In Rescue and also just viewing the online Dane Groups we can see that the breed is suffering in temperament mostly from nervy dogs that become fear aggressive so avoid Backyard breeders and make no excuses for the temperaments of Mum/Dad/Siblings.

Adorable picture!!!

I'm obsessed with that rescue website, i'm on it several times a day and had the calendar last year!

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