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Leah82

Oodles On The Project

45 posts in this topic

Rosetta   

None of those presenters are funny..

And I met a lady at my work once who had a $7000 lab/poodle that was supposed to be her therapy/guide dog. The poor thing was a nervous wreck cowering in the corner at the vet's office and snapped at anyone who walked by! Think someone got ripped off, but that's your average oodle owner :laugh:

Not sure what that means :confused: Anyway, was the dog there to see the vet? Could have been a health issue that was causing the dog to act like that.

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None of those presenters are funny..

And I met a lady at my work once who had a $7000 lab/poodle that was supposed to be her therapy/guide dog. The poor thing was a nervous wreck cowering in the corner at the vet's office and snapped at anyone who walked by! Think someone got ripped off, but that's your average oodle owner :laugh:

Not sure what that means :confused: Anyway, was the dog there to see the vet? Could have been a health issue that was causing the dog to act like that.

That they buy into the rubbish claims oodle breeders go on about? The majority of them are neurotic and hyperactive, such unpleasant dogs. I've yet to meet one that I like other than one cav/poodle I housesat a couple years back.

And it was in for a general checkup, but it was obviously not a dog with good nerve.

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Sheridan   

None of those presenters are funny..

And I met a lady at my work once who had a $7000 lab/poodle that was supposed to be her therapy/guide dog. The poor thing was a nervous wreck cowering in the corner at the vet's office and snapped at anyone who walked by! Think someone got ripped off, but that's your average oodle owner :laugh:

Not sure what that means :confused: Anyway, was the dog there to see the vet? Could have been a health issue that was causing the dog to act like that.

That they buy into the rubbish claims oodle breeders go on about? The majority of them are neurotic and hyperactive, such unpleasant dogs. I've yet to meet one that I like other than one cav/poodle I housesat a couple years back.

And it was in for a general checkup, but it was obviously not a dog with good nerve.

That's as much a generalisation as the one used by the oodle brigade that all purebred dogs are inbred and going to die of heritable diseases.

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Kavik   

Beagles have to approach people and baggage- they need to be socially acceptable and friendly in appearance- many people are already scared of dogs and they definitely don't want them to seem imposing.

Yes, true, but I have heard that they are switching over to Labs for the airport.

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None of those presenters are funny..

And I met a lady at my work once who had a $7000 lab/poodle that was supposed to be her therapy/guide dog. The poor thing was a nervous wreck cowering in the corner at the vet's office and snapped at anyone who walked by! Think someone got ripped off, but that's your average oodle owner :laugh:

Not sure what that means :confused: Anyway, was the dog there to see the vet? Could have been a health issue that was causing the dog to act like that.

That they buy into the rubbish claims oodle breeders go on about? The majority of them are neurotic and hyperactive, such unpleasant dogs. I've yet to meet one that I like other than one cav/poodle I housesat a couple years back.

And it was in for a general checkup, but it was obviously not a dog with good nerve.

That's as much a generalisation as the one used by the oodle brigade that all purebred dogs are inbred and going to die of heritable diseases.

I work in pet retail; I see these dogs come in and out the door ALL DAY and that's what my experience has been. I've met a handful that were sociable. I'm not a fan of DDs and I'm not going to apologise for it. :confused:

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Rosetta   

None of those presenters are funny..

And I met a lady at my work once who had a $7000 lab/poodle that was supposed to be her therapy/guide dog. The poor thing was a nervous wreck cowering in the corner at the vet's office and snapped at anyone who walked by! Think someone got ripped off, but that's your average oodle owner :laugh:

Not sure what that means :confused: Anyway, was the dog there to see the vet? Could have been a health issue that was causing the dog to act like that.

That they buy into the rubbish claims oodle breeders go on about? The majority of them are neurotic and hyperactive, such unpleasant dogs. I've yet to meet one that I like other than one cav/poodle I housesat a couple years back.

And it was in for a general checkup, but it was obviously not a dog with good nerve.

That's as much a generalisation as the one used by the oodle brigade that all purebred dogs are inbred and going to die of heritable diseases.

I agree. There are some breeds that I have never met a nice one of - won't name them :) - but I certainly don't think you can make a blanket statement that xyz breeds are "unpleasant" because you haven't met a "nice" one.

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Call me crazy but the nose and the ears on that dog look too long for either a saint or a cav? Maybe it's just because I live with one but whatever that is looks like it could have some basset in it with those long ears...

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Steph M   

I saw that too. Disgusting! I hope not, but if it is I so hope the st Bernard is mum....

Let's hope its fake and doesn't catch on.

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I met a lot of oodles when running a boarding kennel in WA. I wouldn't say they are any better or any worse than any other dog in terms of health or behavior. Sure, some are obnoxious. But their owners tend to be affluent and not experienced dog people; many were bought from pet shops. So the odds were good that they would be spoiled and poorly trained.

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tlc   

Gee this thread makes me feel like such an exception to the rule!

I have 4 oodles, well trained, well socialised, well groomed, not obnoxious and not bought from pet shops!

I also consider myself an experienced dog person and my dogs are all therapy dogs who visit facilities regularly.

It's rare that I blow my own trumpet but where my dogs are concerned I do on occasion have a small brag.

So they are oodles but if they were any other breed or cross I'd still be saying the same thing.

Not all oodle owners are bogans with no clue!

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Steph M   

What baffles me is why would you pick an -oodle over any other breed?

They're just not for me, but so many other breeds they're composed of are.

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Leah82   

wow, I didn't realise this thread was still going.

I too am an oodle owner although she cost $350 from a rescue org.

She is however the sweetest and gentlest (is that even a word) little dog I've even had the pleasure of knowing and I can't believe that that's entirely because of her up bringing in a puppy farm

20 years ago there were lots of hereditary illnesses in purebred dogs so the generalisation isn't entirely unwarranted, a lot of people don't realise the changes in technology and the DNA testing that registered breeders now do which means you are guaranteed a dog free from genetic diseases. There needs to be more media coverage about that.

Probably off topic, I know a lot of registered breeders continue to breed carriers of certain diseases, just not with another carrier. Why wouldn't you want to eliminate these diseases all together by only breeding clear dogs? There's always the chance that one of your puppy owners may decide to breed their carrier puppy with another carrier unknowingly and the disease continues

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Probably off topic, I know a lot of registered breeders continue to breed carriers of certain diseases, just not with another carrier. Why wouldn't you want to eliminate these diseases all together by only breeding clear dogs? There's always the chance that one of your puppy owners may decide to breed their carrier puppy with another carrier unknowingly and the disease continues

Because you're unnecessarily limiting an already pretty limited gene pool. Limit it that much more and you're bound to see more problems crop up.

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Lhok   

wow, I didn't realise this thread was still going.

I too am an oodle owner although she cost $350 from a rescue org.

She is however the sweetest and gentlest (is that even a word) little dog I've even had the pleasure of knowing and I can't believe that that's entirely because of her up bringing in a puppy farm

20 years ago there were lots of hereditary illnesses in purebred dogs so the generalisation isn't entirely unwarranted, a lot of people don't realise the changes in technology and the DNA testing that registered breeders now do which means you are guaranteed a dog free from genetic diseases. There needs to be more media coverage about that.

Probably off topic, I know a lot of registered breeders continue to breed carriers of certain diseases, just not with another carrier. Why wouldn't you want to eliminate these diseases all together by only breeding clear dogs? There's always the chance that one of your puppy owners may decide to breed their carrier puppy with another carrier unknowingly and the disease continues

Breeding carriers as long as it is documented isn't the end of the world. Yes the goal is to eliminate the disease but you also don't want to severely limit the breeding lines by only breeding clear dogs. The point of puppy owners breeding their carrier dogs together unknowingly is always a concern which is why people should be absolutely clear as to why the pup in question is to be desexed. Then if they do breed it down the track they can't say they didn't know. As far as I am concerned ignorance isn't a defence.

--Lhok

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wow, I didn't realise this thread was still going.

I too am an oodle owner although she cost $350 from a rescue org.

She is however the sweetest and gentlest (is that even a word) little dog I've even had the pleasure of knowing and I can't believe that that's entirely because of her up bringing in a puppy farm

20 years ago there were lots of hereditary illnesses in purebred dogs so the generalisation isn't entirely unwarranted, a lot of people don't realise the changes in technology and the DNA testing that registered breeders now do which means you are guaranteed a dog free from genetic diseases. There needs to be more media coverage about that.

Probably off topic, I know a lot of registered breeders continue to breed carriers of certain diseases, just not with another carrier. Why wouldn't you want to eliminate these diseases all together by only breeding clear dogs? There's always the chance that one of your puppy owners may decide to breed their carrier puppy with another carrier unknowingly and the disease continues

It's already been said but its because the fact that a dog is a clear by DNA for a particular disease is only one genetic factor in a whole raft of factors that are taken into consideration before a mating takes place.

If there is an outstanding dog that is a carrier, and he is bred to a clear bitch then the odds of producing affected dogs is ZERO. DNA testing stops breeding dogs that will be affected by the disease. Why throw the baby out with the bath water and wipe out a significant proportion of a breed who are not affected and can be responsibly bred to produce pups that won't be affected either?

What people who don't DNA test do doesn't matter. They have no idea what they're breeding in DNA terms so why should carefull breeding of carriers be stopped by responsible breeders because of what some shonky pet buyer might or might not do?

Breeders can health test pups prior to sale and advise buyers of their DNA status - and some breeders I know do. :)

Edited by Haredown Whippets

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denali   

Gee this thread makes me feel like such an exception to the rule!

I have 4 oodles, well trained, well socialised, well groomed, not obnoxious and not bought from pet shops!

I also consider myself an experienced dog person and my dogs are all therapy dogs who visit facilities regularly.

It's rare that I blow my own trumpet but where my dogs are concerned I do on occasion have a small brag.

So they are oodles but if they were any other breed or cross I'd still be saying the same thing.

Not all oodle owners are bogans with no clue!

I think you are an exception to the rule!

I am a dog groomer, and get many many oodles.

Most are psychotic, unsocialised and spoilt.

I have a total of 3 that are not. A groodle, a cavoodle, and a spoodle.

I have so far never met a sane labradoodle.

I am not sure how much of it is the breed, and how much of it is the people- i would say a combination of both.

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JulesP   

I actually found the oodles ok as a dog groomer and trainer. Grooming they were all fine. Training was a bit of a mixed bunch as they are pretty smart so it depended on the owner. The little white fluffies on the other hand were not pleasant to deal with.

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OSoSwift   

I haven't met a huge amount of the larger megabuck mongrels, but those I have are not for the faint hearted!! They are some decidedly insane very large dogs.

We have many small megabuck mongrels and there have been three in my 15 years of grooming I could take home. If the don't have terrible conformation, they have terrible temperaments - or both!!

I have one who comes into the kennels that is apparently a f3 or 4 labradoodle he is chocolate, border collie sized and has a coat like a flat coat but with shorter furnishings. He is lovely, I could keep him :)

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