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Steve

Pet Rescue Pound Dog Campaign

42 posts in this topic

Steve   

So go back a while - the only thing I knew about rescue was that if people didn't take dogs they would be killed. For a while I couldn't understand why things I saw happening in private rescue were happening. Why were private rescue wanting to make it harder for people to take home one of their dogs, why were they so keen on testing temperament,ensuring they weren't incubating disease or have health issues etc? After all wasn't the goal to get as many out alive as possible? Ive watched how the different philosophies ,people and groups work ,Ive seen P Rounds in action and listened to the critics .Ive taken note of stats from a big rescue org who brag about numbers placed and see that about 43% of dogs they know of that they place bounce back either to them or other rescue groups. Ive had meetings with people and groups from both sides of the fence and I understand that there will always be some who simply want everything saved,get em a new home no support not much testing etc and others who want to be sure that only well temperaments ,healthy dogs which are well suited to the placement go out and who offer post placement support etc.

I understand that some people , some families can live with any dog even if it comes in as one thing and ends up another but that's not me. I don't want a dog that is what I consider high risk because it hasn't been tested and would need me and my family to change what we do and how we do it.

The idea a dog would come from rescue and hurt a child or another animal,worrying about it more than I can enjoy its company when that could be avoided scares me. I dont really quite understand how most people and certainly most families would take such things under consideration or how they can be more sure of what they are getting if they don't go through a private rescue which is operating with integrity.

There are several assumptions in this push for more placements to made straight from the pounds. The stats above are used to push this campaign but could just as easily be used to prop up other potential solutions such as changes to traditional methods of set up and running private rescue groups.

wages for administrators and foster carers etc.

As I said earlier there is probably room for both and those taking a dog directly from a pound is a different target market to someone who prefers less risk. Much depends on what comes next in how pounds are expected to manage this and move them out. Recently I had a call from a woman distressed because council had given her 14 days to get her dogs off her property - council laws in her state said 2 dogs and she had 15 .She felt this was very unfair as they were all small rescue dogs which she had saved - 10 of which she got from Blacktown pound. How will this sort of thing be

prevented are questions I would be interested in seeing.

There has been a lot of great work done to promote the idea that taking a rescue dog is a good viable alternative when looking for a family pet so Id hope that part of what pounds will do is lower the risks.

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megan_   

But then getting from a rescue is right for you? They aren't saying "don't go to a rescue, only go to the pound", they're just promoting the pound system as an option. After all, most of the dogs on PR are from rescues, so they are getting the most exposure there.

Some pounds temp test, and some rescues do a really bad job of temp testing (sometimes a nervy temp means a dog is classified as soft, rather than bite risks for example)

There are a number of good places to get a new dog depending on your situation and your level of flexibility: an ethical breeder, an ethical rescuer, or the pound. There are pros and cons for each option.

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Steve   

But then getting from a rescue is right for you? They aren't saying "don't go to a rescue, only go to the pound", they're just promoting the pound system as an option. After all, most of the dogs on PR are from rescues, so they are getting the most exposure there.

Some pounds temp test, and some rescues do a really bad job of temp testing (sometimes a nervy temp means a dog is classified as soft, rather than bite risks for example)

There are a number of good places to get a new dog depending on your situation and your level of flexibility: an ethical breeder, an ethical rescuer, or the pound. There are pros and cons for each option.

Im not interested in the adjective ethical but I would consider taking a pound dog at around the same level as taking one from a puppy farmer. Both are looking for homes for dogs already here and both could care less about the dogs they have or where they go and both carry higher risks for the new owner.

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But then getting from a rescue is right for you? They aren't saying "don't go to a rescue, only go to the pound", they're just promoting the pound system as an option. After all, most of the dogs on PR are from rescues, so they are getting the most exposure there.

Some pounds temp test, and some rescues do a really bad job of temp testing (sometimes a nervy temp means a dog is classified as soft, rather than bite risks for example)

There are a number of good places to get a new dog depending on your situation and your level of flexibility: an ethical breeder, an ethical rescuer, or the pound. There are pros and cons for each option.

Im not interested in the adjective ethical but I would consider taking a pound dog at around the same level as taking one from a puppy farmer. Both are looking for homes for dogs already here and both could care less about the dogs they have or where they go and both carry higher risks for the new owner.

This is not true of *many* pounds.

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tdierikx   

Let's get real here... a heck of a lot of dogs in rescue foster homes have come straight from a pound... and a heck of a lot of those are perfectly lovely dogs from the get go.

The notion that pound dogs are any more likely to be problems of one sort or another is actually a bit of a myth. Fair enough that some may be naughty teens that need a little bit of discipline/obedience training... or just a bit more attention than their previous owners may have been able to give them...

I can say from experience in selecting quite a number of dogs from a few Sydney pounds, that I probably saw about 1-2% of that number needing anything more than a stable home life and able to spend more time with their fave humans.

Yes - I fostered puppies, but that was not the only job I had with the rescue. I selected many adult pound dogs over the years to take into our rescue.

T.

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Steve   

Let's get real here... a heck of a lot of dogs in rescue foster homes have come straight from a pound... and a heck of a lot of those are perfectly lovely dogs from the get go.

The notion that pound dogs are any more likely to be problems of one sort or another is actually a bit of a myth. Fair enough that some may be naughty teens that need a little bit of discipline/obedience training... or just a bit more attention than their previous owners may have been able to give them...

I can say from experience in selecting quite a number of dogs from a few Sydney pounds, that I probably saw about 1-2% of that number needing anything more than a stable home life and able to spend more time with their fave humans.

Yes - I fostered puppies, but that was not the only job I had with the rescue. I selected many adult pound dogs over the years to take into our rescue.

T.

I get that a heck of a lot of dogs come straight from pounds to foster homes and that a heck of a lot of them are perfectly lovely well temperamented and healthy dogs from the get go but that dosent change the fact that these dogs leave foster care with a more intense assessment

How is it possible to be as sure that there is no issue or to have a better view of what type of family best suits it if you are assessing a dog in a pound setting?

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Steve   

But then getting from a rescue is right for you? They aren't saying "don't go to a rescue, only go to the pound", they're just promoting the pound system as an option. After all, most of the dogs on PR are from rescues, so they are getting the most exposure there.

Some pounds temp test, and some rescues do a really bad job of temp testing (sometimes a nervy temp means a dog is classified as soft, rather than bite risks for example)

There are a number of good places to get a new dog depending on your situation and your level of flexibility: an ethical breeder, an ethical rescuer, or the pound. There are pros and cons for each option.

Im not interested in the adjective ethical but I would consider taking a pound dog at around the same level as taking one from a puppy farmer. Both are looking for homes for dogs already here and both could care less about the dogs they have or where they go and both carry higher risks for the new owner.

This is not true of *many* pounds.

Thats not true of many puppy farmers either. I'm eager to learn about this and hear how pounds which are considered to be doing the right thing in assessing, homing and supporting the people who take their animals are doing this.Are there any examples?

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Steve   

Let's get real here... a heck of a lot of dogs in rescue foster homes have come straight from a pound... and a heck of a lot of those are perfectly lovely dogs from the get go.

The notion that pound dogs are any more likely to be problems of one sort or another is actually a bit of a myth. Fair enough that some may be naughty teens that need a little bit of discipline/obedience training... or just a bit more attention than their previous owners may have been able to give them...

I can say from experience in selecting quite a number of dogs from a few Sydney pounds, that I probably saw about 1-2% of that number needing anything more than a stable home life and able to spend more time with their fave humans.

Yes - I fostered puppies, but that was not the only job I had with the rescue. I selected many adult pound dogs over the years to take into our rescue.

T.

So it seems Im missing something here. Is it worse for a group like Pound Rounds to move dogs out with assumption that only a tiny minority will have problems than it is for a pound to do so?

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tdierikx   

Let's get real here... a heck of a lot of dogs in rescue foster homes have come straight from a pound... and a heck of a lot of those are perfectly lovely dogs from the get go.

The notion that pound dogs are any more likely to be problems of one sort or another is actually a bit of a myth. Fair enough that some may be naughty teens that need a little bit of discipline/obedience training... or just a bit more attention than their previous owners may have been able to give them...

I can say from experience in selecting quite a number of dogs from a few Sydney pounds, that I probably saw about 1-2% of that number needing anything more than a stable home life and able to spend more time with their fave humans.

Yes - I fostered puppies, but that was not the only job I had with the rescue. I selected many adult pound dogs over the years to take into our rescue.

T.

I get that a heck of a lot of dogs come straight from pounds to foster homes and that a heck of a lot of them are perfectly lovely well temperamented and healthy dogs from the get go but that dosent change the fact that these dogs leave foster care with a more intense assessment

How is it possible to be as sure that there is no issue or to have a better view of what type of family best suits it if you are assessing a dog in a pound setting?

Don't forget that many foster carers are no more qualified in assessing dog temperaments than the Average Joe either... *grin*

Highly experienced foster carers are few and far between...

T.

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Steve   

Let's get real here... a heck of a lot of dogs in rescue foster homes have come straight from a pound... and a heck of a lot of those are perfectly lovely dogs from the get go.

The notion that pound dogs are any more likely to be problems of one sort or another is actually a bit of a myth. Fair enough that some may be naughty teens that need a little bit of discipline/obedience training... or just a bit more attention than their previous owners may have been able to give them...

I can say from experience in selecting quite a number of dogs from a few Sydney pounds, that I probably saw about 1-2% of that number needing anything more than a stable home life and able to spend more time with their fave humans.

Yes - I fostered puppies, but that was not the only job I had with the rescue. I selected many adult pound dogs over the years to take into our rescue.

T.

I get that a heck of a lot of dogs come straight from pounds to foster homes and that a heck of a lot of them are perfectly lovely well temperamented and healthy dogs from the get go but that dosent change the fact that these dogs leave foster care with a more intense assessment

How is it possible to be as sure that there is no issue or to have a better view of what type of family best suits it if you are assessing a dog in a pound setting?

Don't forget that many foster carers are no more qualified in assessing dog temperaments than the Average Joe either... *grin*

Highly experienced foster carers are few and far between...

T.

So explain what you are saying - have I been conned by believing that its better to go through a rescue group? All of the foster carers I've met [hundreds of them] have been awesome and they have had training and support from their group admins ,they work with trainers and are highly skilled or being trained with support .

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Willem   

wrt dog from pounds vs breeders / backyard breeders:

when the decision was made for a dog for our family (with 2 little kids) I didn't want to take the risk to end up with a problem dog - instead I wanted a dog with known traits we could train / shape from young age. Plus I wanted an entire dog...and there is - dare that I say it - also the fee that exceeds (sometimes) or is similar to the price you have to pay for a pup from a backyard breeder.

Hence when we found a backyard breeder with a litter not far from us, who offered not only all the required paperwork for registration and first vaccination, but also asking for a price that was similar to the fee we had to pay for a dog from the pound the unanimous decision was made for one of the backyard breeder's pups.

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shel   

The pound system killing pets in lieu of offering them for adoption is a hugely damaging, dysfunctional and unethical process. Arguing the value of various rescue processes is semantics, in the face of enormous harm. I don't understand the thinking of anyone who would argue we should maintain rather than completely overhaul.

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Steve   

The pound system killing pets in lieu of offering them for adoption is a hugely damaging, dysfunctional and unethical process. Arguing the value of various rescue processes is semantics, in the face of enormous harm. I don't understand the thinking of anyone who would argue we should maintain rather than completely overhaul.

If you mean me Im not arguing we should maintain rather than overhaul.I just dont necessarily agree that this particular overhauling process is necessarily the best or all its cracked up to be.

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tdierikx   

Don't forget that many foster carers are no more qualified in assessing dog temperaments than the Average Joe either... *grin*

Highly experienced foster carers are few and far between...

T.

So explain what you are saying - have I been conned by believing that its better to go through a rescue group? All of the foster carers I've met [hundreds of them] have been awesome and they have had training and support from their group admins ,they work with trainers and are highly skilled or being trained with support .

To some extent, yes... with the rise in the number of pop-up "save them all at any cost" rescues in recent years, it can be pot luck picking a rescue group that does all the things necessary to have the best outcome for the dogs they "save" from the pound system.

There ARE some incredible and well established rescues out there that fully support their carers and other staff (SSR, Paws, for example), but they are fast being outnumbered by those whose processes leave something to be desired.

Then we have organisations like the RSPCA NSW (the original "rescue group" if you will)... who run pretty much exactly like most pounds (with the inclusion of their dodgy "temperament testing")... and Joe Public also see that model to be perfectly acceptable to source a pet from...

I've also met many foster carers in my travels, and quite frankly, there have been some that I wouldn't entrust with the care of a stuffed toy... sad but true... *sigh*

I stand by my observation and experience in actually being someone who has taken dogs straight from the pound for a rescue, that a good majority of dogs from said pounds would be perfectly fine adopted straight from the pound by a general member of the public.

Demonising the pound system and inferring that all of the animals in them are somehow "broken" and in need of all sorts of work is just wrong. We need to re-educate the public that there ARE perfectly adoptable animals in pounds across this country... rescue cannot save them all, so pounds DO need to step up and at least make a concerted effort to have adoptable animals advertised properly so that they have the same chances as those taken in by rescue.

I've been a foster carer (for more than one group), met plenty of other foster carers, and worked with the pound system to source animals for my rescue group... the reality is NOT what the PR (public relations) machine will have you believe.

T.

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Steve   

Don't forget that many foster carers are no more qualified in assessing dog temperaments than the Average Joe either... *grin*

Highly experienced foster carers are few and far between...

T.

So explain what you are saying - have I been conned by believing that its better to go through a rescue group? All of the foster carers I've met [hundreds of them] have been awesome and they have had training and support from their group admins ,they work with trainers and are highly skilled or being trained with support .

To some extent, yes... with the rise in the number of pop-up "save them all at any cost" rescues in recent years, it can be pot luck picking a rescue group that does all the things necessary to have the best outcome for the dogs they "save" from the pound system.

There ARE some incredible and well established rescues out there that fully support their carers and other staff (SSR, Paws, for example), but they are fast being outnumbered by those whose processes leave something to be desired.

Then we have organisations like the RSPCA NSW (the original "rescue group" if you will)... who run pretty much exactly like most pounds (with the inclusion of their dodgy "temperament testing")... and Joe Public also see that model to be perfectly acceptable to source a pet from...

I've also met many foster carers in my travels, and quite frankly, there have been some that I wouldn't entrust with the care of a stuffed toy... sad but true... *sigh*

I stand by my observation and experience in actually being someone who has taken dogs straight from the pound for a rescue, that a good majority of dogs from said pounds would be perfectly fine adopted straight from the pound by a general member of the public.

Demonising the pound system and inferring that all of the animals in them are somehow "broken" and in need of all sorts of work is just wrong. We need to re-educate the public that there ARE perfectly adoptable animals in pounds across this country... rescue cannot save them all, so pounds DO need to step up and at least make a concerted effort to have adoptable animals advertised properly so that they have the same chances as those taken in by rescue.

I've been a foster carer (for more than one group), met plenty of other foster carers, and worked with the pound system to source animals for my rescue group... the reality is NOT what the PR (public relations) machine will have you believe.

T.

Wow - Thats that then.

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Steve I'd recommend checking out Sydney Dogs and Cats Home in Sydney as far as pounds doing an excellent job.

They have very high live release rates, do not place time restrictions on adoptable animals, treat medical and behavioural issues, have a foster care program, run playgroups (despite not having play yards - no excuses!), trial periods on adoptions, well resourced volunteer program and an average length of stay of about 3 or 4 weeks last time I checked.

They don't rely on rescue for their stats - they contact rescue when needed for dogs that are truly not coping, but given they do such a great job of running the place and getting them out ASAP that isn't needed too often.

They also take pets at risk at other pounds (mostly Campbelltown I think) when they have the ability to do so.

They have an excellent open adoption program and work to find ways to say 'yes' to adoptions and make the process enjoyable and supportive for adopters.

Edited by melzawelza

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Steve   

Steve I'd recommend checking out Sydney Dogs and Cats Home in Sydney as far as pounds doing an excellent job.

They have very high live release rates, do not place time restrictions on adoptable animals, treat medical and behavioural issues, have a foster care program, run playgroups (despite not having play yards - no excuses!), trial periods on adoptions, well resourced volunteer program and an average length of stay of about 3 or 4 weeks last time I checked.

They don't rely on rescue for their stats - they contact rescue when needed for dogs that are truly not coping, but given they do such a great job of running the place and getting them out ASAP that isn't needed too often.

They also take pets at risk at other pounds (mostly Campbelltown I think) when they have the ability to do so.

They have an excellent open adoption program and work to find ways to say 'yes' to adoptions and make the process enjoyable and supportive for adopters.

Thank you

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A lot of pounds dont do any remedial works with their dogs or treat any health issue to try and stop it getting worse. I understand that financially they cant afford to do this and it is not part of their role,but they shouldnt hang onto dogs trying to sell them first. Then offloading them onto a rescue to sort out the problems when no sale eventuated.

sdch dont do much work with rescue,other pounds are more rescue friendly.

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They don't do much work with rescue because they don't need to - they do the job they are paid to do and don't palm it off to unpaid volunteers in order to keep pets alive. They do both health and behavioral rehab, their live release rate is very high, and their length of stay is short. Rescue is reserved for those few pets who truly need it.

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They are better than a lot with dogs,but they need to do much better with cats,as do every facility.There is always room for improvement in kill rates in every facility,sdch included.

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