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Tornado

Which breed is best?

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Tornado   

Yes, we'd ruled out basenjis because I know they can be difficult. :-)

 

I had thought a Cav but I wasn't sure about the brushing. I'm not sure they'd have another Lab because they were so heartbroken at the loss of their last one but it might work out well. I had considered a Staffy. Any dog we get would probably be at least two years old and I've been keeping an eye on the DOL breed pages for available older dogs because I want to make sure they get a good quality animal. I'll keep looking there. :-)

 

Thanks everyone for your help. :-)

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Bias declared up front, but if they can get past the on-leash in public requirement, then I really don't think you can go past a greyhound for elderly folk.  Bart has been an incredible success for my elderly friends - and its all gone far better then my wildest dreams. And the GAP people have been fantastic. And cheap as chips for such a wonderful, well supported dog.  So remembering there's no such thing as the perfect dog, I'd seriously consider a grey. :)

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My first thought was a cocker spaniel, but then the coat maintenance would be an issue. Other breeds that came to mind were Boston terrier, collie smooth, or Border terrier. I have no personal experience of these breeds though!

Edited by grizabella

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Maddy   
1 hour ago, westiemum said:

Bias declared up front, but if they can get past the on-leash in public requirement, then I really don't think you can go past a greyhound for elderly folk.  Bart has been an incredible success for my elderly friends - and its all gone far better then my wildest dreams. And the GAP people have been fantastic. And cheap as chips for such a wonderful, well supported dog.  So remembering there's no such thing as the perfect dog, I'd seriously consider a grey. :)

Not if they want to run it off-leash. Prey drive (and their considerable acceleration ability) aside, a greyhound running loose with other dogs is a recipe for someone to get hurt: little dogs getting mowed down, other dogs chasing the greyhound (which can easily escalate into biting the greyhound) or fall/collision injuries.

And all this is assuming it's a fenced off-leash park. If not, your greyhound is as good as gone.
Dog parks can be dangerous places at the best of times, without all the associated risks of running sighthounds off-leash.

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21 minutes ago, Maddy said:

Not if they want to run it off-leash. Prey drive (and their considerable acceleration ability) aside, a greyhound running loose with other dogs is a recipe for someone to get hurt: little dogs getting mowed down, other dogs chasing the greyhound (which can easily escalate into biting the greyhound) or fall/collision injuries.

And all this is assuming it's a fenced off-leash park. If not, your greyhound is as good as gone.
Dog parks can be dangerous places at the best of times, without all the associated risks of running sighthounds off-leash.

Agreed Maddy.  That's why I said if  they can get past the on-leash in public requirement.  And if they can't then a grey won't be suitable. :) 

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If the plan is to sit and watch the dog run off lead then I wouldn't recommend any breed personally.  No owner should be sitting in an off lead park and this is one of my biggest peeves.

 

I would suggest something medium in size -- maybe up to about 22kg. A breed I've fallen in love with for both size and temperament is the German Pinscher and I've met a few through showing and agility. They are an active breed so will require mental and physical stimulation though.

 

i also like the Schipperke but probably too much coat for what your parents are after.

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Maddy   
21 hours ago, westiemum said:

Agreed Maddy.  That's why I said if  they can get past the on-leash in public requirement.  And if they can't then a grey won't be suitable. :) 

The other issue is that unless you get a grey with very low drive, there is the possibility that they may lunge after something interesting and pull an elderly owner over.

I'm not at all against elderly people owning greys, I just think it's something people need to be aware of. Greys can accelerate with incredible force, with little to no warning and if the person on the other end of the leash isn't strong enough to pull the dog up without a chance to brace themselves, the risk of falls is very high. For a similar reason, it is against the law for people under the age of 16 to control a greyhound in a public place.
This isn't to say that all greys will do that sort of thing but matching dogs to elderly owners can be more difficult and not all groups bother to actually place dogs according to suitability. 

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On 20/02/2017 at 6:55 PM, grizabella said:

My first thought was a cocker spaniel, but then the coat maintenance would be an issue. Other breeds that came to mind were Boston terrier, collie smooth, or Border terrier. I have no personal experience of these breeds though!

Collie smooth could work! Collie rough too temperament wise and I believe they are generally a bit lower energy than the smooths but more grooming involved, although it is suprisingly easy for how much fur they have. But I'd definitely agree with looking into a calm natured Collie smooth. Collies are herding dogs but waaaaayyyy more chilled than most of the other working breeds.

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I would suggest going either through a reputable rescue who has their dogs in foster care (past just the initial settling in period) or an shelter dog that has some known history (ie surrender info). You can get some absolutely fantastic dogs "2nd hand" so to speak and I don't think it's worth limiting yourself to certain breeds based on breed traits. Of course some traits are going to lend themselves more than others to their situation, but it's just as important to look at the individual dog's personality. A nice corgi, jack Russell, foxy or beagle type could fit the bill :)

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denali   
On 2/20/2017 at 4:46 PM, Tornado said:

Yes, we'd ruled out basenjis because I know they can be difficult. :-)

 

I had thought a Cav but I wasn't sure about the brushing. I'm not sure they'd have another Lab because they were so heartbroken at the loss of their last one but it might work out well. I had considered a Staffy. Any dog we get would probably be at least two years old and I've been keeping an eye on the DOL breed pages for available older dogs because I want to make sure they get a good quality animal. I'll keep looking there. :-)

 

Thanks everyone for your help. :-)


Honestly i rarely brush my dogs :laugh:
Just need combing if they run through prickles, and maybe a tiny bit behind the ears to stop those matts. Otherwise, very easy care coats. 

Cavs do have a tendency to chase shadows, birds etc. and want to greet people, which does mean they can be absolutely terrible off lead and have zero road sense. In saying that, mine are off leash everyday- but have all had extensive recall training that i still practice with them today. 

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I agree with getting recommendations for a reputable Rescue ..and going from there !!

 

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What about a Poodle - Toy or Miniature - I have met some great little Poodles - lovely personalities and intelligent little dogs. A couple are owned by older people who go to off lead parks and sit while the Poodle just happily plays nearby.

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On ‎20‎/‎02‎/‎2017 at 6:05 PM, westiemum said:

....  Bart has been an incredible success for my elderly friends - .... I'd seriously consider a grey. :)

I think we are all stoked that he has worked out and fitted in so well.  My hesitation re Greys is that one swallow does not a summer make.  They are talked up so much as being quiet and suitable for quiet ownership that people have unrealistic expectations.  I have seen it not work out, something between disappointing and devastating, much as Maddy has mentioned.

 

Glad a couple of people mentioned Collie Smooth - most longer term Dolers would remember ChezzyR's lovely Rosie (still going strong I think) - these shots show her out and about and fitting in everywhere with everyone.  Lovely coats, but still very easy care.  http://www.pbase.com/chezzyr/smooth_collie_rosie

 

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Ashka   

Cavaliers are lovely dogs but only some lines have easy care coats, mine have needed combing at least a couple of time a week...

My late boy had a lovely coat.. his 2.5 year old grandson is similar.. 

Ashka July'12.JPG

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3 hours ago, PossumCorner said:

I think we are all stoked that he has worked out and fitted in so well.  My hesitation re Greys is that one swallow does not a summer make.  They are talked up so much as being quiet and suitable for quiet ownership that people have unrealistic expectations.  I have seen it not work out, something between disappointing and devastating, much as Maddy has mentioned.

 

Glad a couple of people mentioned Collie Smooth - most longer term Dolers would remember ChezzyR's lovely Rosie (still going strong I think) - these shots show her out and about and fitting in everywhere with everyone.  Lovely coats, but still very easy care.  http://www.pbase.com/chezzyr/smooth_collie_rosie

 

While I absolutely agree PC, two quick things before I go back to work - firstly, many breeds pull and pull hard - so greys are not the only ones.  Small dogs are tripping hazards for the elderly, and bigger dogs are heavy to lift and pull (and thats a problem for me at age 55 as well so not confined to the elderly) - so again I think its a case of carefully matching the dog to the person/people/circumstances.   Given that falls are the biggest cause of disability (and eventual death :( ) in our elderly folk bar none, (look up the stats), I think size needs to be a prime consideration.   

 

Secondly the reason I always say GAP greys is because of their very thorough matching process which should almost always ensure a dog well temperament matched to the new owner and their circumstances, regardless.  

 

Having said that, sure, greys are not the only dogs for elderly folk.  But if well matched I still think overall they are a good option.  

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Maddy   
7 hours ago, PossumCorner said:

I think we are all stoked that he has worked out and fitted in so well.  My hesitation re Greys is that one swallow does not a summer make.  They are talked up so much as being quiet and suitable for quiet ownership that people have unrealistic expectations.  I have seen it not work out, something between disappointing and devastating, much as Maddy has mentioned.

 

Glad a couple of people mentioned Collie Smooth - most longer term Dolers would remember ChezzyR's lovely Rosie (still going strong I think) - these shots show her out and about and fitting in everywhere with everyone.  Lovely coats, but still very easy care.  http://www.pbase.com/chezzyr/smooth_collie_rosie

 

This. I've had my fair share of complete nutters. They were nice nutters, for the most part, but a 35kg dog that is made of muscles and excitement can be a difficult dog to manage. A lot of people seem to expect a gentle giant who will cuddle all day on the couch, surrounded by kittens and baby bunnies (a dog sold to them by groups like Animals Australia), and they're often disappointed to discover that greys (not unlike other breeds) come in a spectrum of activity and prey drive levels. I've rehomed a handful of kitten-cuddlers but the vast majority are somewhere in the middle- they love a good nap but they're not above wrenching your arm from its socket if they happen to spot a cat while out walking.

 

Also, I think it's worth pointing out that not all GAPs are created equal. Some, like GAP Victoria, have a very good reputation for doings things right. Others.. not so much. It's no different to any other rescue/rehoming group in that you have to do your research. 

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juice   

What about a beagle ? 

Meduim size , robust , sturdy . Will happily spend ages with its nose to ground in offlead park .  

 

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3 hours ago, Maddy said:

This. I've had my fair share of complete nutters. They were nice nutters, for the most part, but a 35kg dog that is made of muscles and excitement can be a difficult dog to manage. A lot of people seem to expect a gentle giant who will cuddle all day on the couch, surrounded by kittens and baby bunnies (a dog sold to them by groups like Animals Australia), and they're often disappointed to discover that greys (not unlike other breeds) come in a spectrum of activity and prey drive levels. I've rehomed a handful of kitten-cuddlers but the vast majority are somewhere in the middle- they love a good nap but they're not above wrenching your arm from its socket if they happen to spot a cat while out walking.

 

Also, I think it's worth pointing out that not all GAPs are created equal. Some, like GAP Victoria, have a very good reputation for doings things right. Others.. not so much. It's no different to any other rescue/rehoming group in that you have to do your research. 

And how is that variability any different to any other breed  or any rescue service? They all have their advantages and disadvantages given there is no such thing as the perfect dog and greys are no exception.  It would be really helpful if the 'breed experts' provided a balanced view of the pros and cons of the breed which helped rather than hindered people looking for a dog.  

 

Genuine further question not in relation to Maddy's posts:  Why is it beginning to look like there is an exclusive club here that you need to belong to before you can suggest a greyhound which doesn't seem to apply to any other breed? Every time someone other than a selected few here suggest a grey they get jumped on and the discussion proceeds to damage the breed further. Its beginning to look like the worst of purebreed snobbery.  

 

I actually am beginning to feel very sorry for this breed - there's little hope for it with all this absolutely damning advocacy going on here, not to mention current publicity.  

 

I'm not going to discuss greys any further here as I don't want to be party to damaging the breed further.  i'll continue to support the breed outside DOL and refer people to GAP.  

 

Well done people. Another breed advocate gives up on here. 

 

Play on...

 

ETA: And BTW this sort of public discussion is damaging. And I for one am tired of trying to defend it and explain it to people who are simply trying to choose a dog.

Edited by westiemum
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