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Zoeh

Would anyone recommend Hanrob training for life?

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Zoeh   

We have a 5 month old American staffy who has gone through puppy school but in our current living situation we need her to be quite obedient. 

We have had an in home trainer come to our house but she more so told us how to instead of actually training our pup. 

Was wondering if anyone had recently used hanrob for training or even boarding? We obviously want our pup to be well looked after and 18 days is a long time so curious as to see people's reviews. 

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In short - No. I would not recommend them for training or board. I have seen the impacts first hand. 

 

Sounds like you weren't happy with your trainer but in my own opinion you need to be shown how to train your dog.  No point in having someone else build the relationship - "sit" and "stay" is more than simply saying a word. 

 

I often say "find someone you click with" in this case, and sorry if this sounds harsh, sounds like you need to suck it up and do as the trainer is telling you. Bit of a generalisation here, but, put the time and effort into your dog and you'll be rewarded with a pet who'll bend over backwards for you. 

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Zoeh   
 

In short - No. I would not recommend them for training or board. I have seen the impacts first hand. 

 

Sounds like you weren't happy with your trainer but in my own opinion you need to be shown how to train your dog.  No point in having someone else build the relationship - "sit" and "stay" is more than simply saying a word. 

 

I often say "find someone you click with" in this case, and sorry if this sounds harsh, sounds like you need to suck it up and do as the trainer is telling you. Bit of a generalisation here, but, put the time and effort into your dog and you'll be rewarded with a pet who'll bend over backwards for you. 

Are you able to tell me why you wouldn't recommend them and what impacts you've seen/how recent this was?

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tdierikx   

Training and obedience are an ongoing thing... it has to do with you building a relationship with your dog, and the dog will want to please you and be around you.

 

It's never going to be as simple as sending your dog off to a stranger to be trained and expecting the dog to be obedient forever more... no quick fixes unfortunately... no matter what the advertising says for the many places that spruik it.

 

If you are in Sydney, you might want to look up Steve Courtney - K9 Pro  http://k9pro.com.au/

 

T.

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I don't recommend them and I have personal experience (training only). I have also sent you a PM.

 

Edited by Papillon Kisses

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Training/educating you pup/dog .
Hmmm

It is all about COMMUNICATION between YOU and your DOG :) It's a wonderful way of you each getting to understand each other - and it's this understanding/honest communication which makes for an 'obedient' and happy dog :)

YOU learn how/why dog is doing X&Y ..and YOU learn how to tell/show her what YOU want :) 

Your trainer was , IMO  doing the sensible thing :)
 

Most dog 'trainers'  show owners how  to do it :) 

have a read here - and I am so glad you've asked on here about boarding/training . 

http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/dog-training-whatever-works/

 

I would also agree with contacting K9 pro . 
here is  a link to a blog about  "LIFE SKILS"   CLICK HERE

a small excerpt -
 

Life Skill Lessons are a combination of many things, from learning how to be calm around other dogs and people, to strolling along without pulling on the leash, and everything in between.

The first things Steve will do is discuss with you what problems your having, what behaviours your dog is or refuses to display and from there he can begin to assess the dogs temperament.

No two people are the same and this goes the same for dogs, we don’t have a one size fits all training program, our solutions are tailored to your needs.

The session may include some behaviour modification, an adjustment to the dogs expectations, some remedial training and or teaching of new skills.

Rewarding a dog (positive reinforcement) increases the dogs desire to repeat the behaviour, most people know this but few can get the relationship working on this premise alone. Steve has developed loads of cool, fun programs and games that can help you reconnect with your dog and get training moving forwards.

Life Skills may be best described as “teaching your dog how to live in your world”.

 


 

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I will never understand how anyone thinks they can send their dog away for a couple of weeks and have returned an obedient compliant dog.  The first training that needs to be done in training a dog is for the human to be trained.   

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RuralPug   

It really is best for family members to be trained in how to educate the dog. This is because dogs aren't computer programs, they are more like kids and are as smart as kids. So they might learn a whole heap of lessons -  but what good is a dog that is only obedient to the trainer and ignores the family because they don't know how to reinforce? The dog will soon be ignoring them. Your in house trainer was correct, in my opinion.

Sending a dog away and receiving a robot back is a very common misconception that a few "training academies" exploit. But it doesn't happen, you might get back a machine that needs constant expensive maintenance by the "trainers". But you don't wan't a robot - you want a family member whose behaviour you can be proud of - and that will mean that you need to learn how to give instructions and rewards, and how to read your dog's body language.

Learning to train your dog is worth the minor effort it takes, and your dog will really bond with you as well.

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..and there's that 'magic' which happens when you & your pup get it right   :) it is one of those 'AHA!' moments which fills owners, and pups with such a good feeling ..endorphins rule!!

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corvus   

I think the training quality at Hanrob has increased considerably in recent times. I used to run Volatile Dog classes on their training oval, so saw a bit of what they are up to. I know some people in the States that do great board and train programs, and it can be really helpful for owners that need to get on top of multiple behaviours in young dogs in particular. Dog trainers are better at training dogs than owners are, obviously. I have done the odd day training job where I come in several times a week, do an hour of training with the dog and then show the owner how to maintain the behaviours we have been working on. At the end of the day, maintenance has to come from the home, because that's where the dog is living. But, that doesn't mean a trainer can't train the dog for someone and leave them with a dog that already has strong behaviours so it's only maintenance that is necessary. 

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I think the training quality at Hanrob has increased considerably in recent times. I used to run Volatile Dog classes on their training oval, so saw a bit of what they are up to. I know some people in the States that do great board and train programs, and it can be really helpful for owners that need to get on top of multiple behaviours in young dogs in particular. Dog trainers are better at training dogs than owners are, obviously. I have done the odd day training job where I come in several times a week, do an hour of training with the dog and then show the owner how to maintain the behaviours we have been working on. At the end of the day, maintenance has to come from the home, because that's where the dog is living. But, that doesn't mean a trainer can't train the dog for someone and leave them with a dog that already has strong behaviours so it's only maintenance that is necessary. 

I agree with this, corvus, but in the final analysis the owner has to be trained as well and that is obviously what you were doing.  People who send their dogs away and have nothing to do with their training are shirking their responsibilities and not doing the right thing by their dog.  So much of dog behaviour depends on the owners, their knowledge, confidence and determination to have a happy, fulfilled dog.  

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I think the training quality at Hanrob has increased considerably in recent times. I used to run Volatile Dog classes on their training oval, so saw a bit of what they are up to.

What people do in a public class can differ greatly from what they do in a private consult or alone with a dog.

Edited by Papillon Kisses
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Zoeh   
 

I agree with this, corvus, but in the final analysis the owner has to be trained as well and that is obviously what you were doing.  People who send their dogs away and have nothing to do with their training are shirking their responsibilities and not doing the right thing by their dog.  So much of dog behaviour depends on the owners, their knowledge, confidence and determination to have a happy, fulfilled dog.  

We're happy to put in the work but we also need some ground work done as this is our first dog. So for someone only telling us what to do leaves us a little confused. I have heard that hanrob train your dogs and when they're ready to be picked up they will show you with your dog what they've been taught and how to carry out commands. I get that training is an ongoing thing and by all means we knew what we were getting ourselves into and knew we had to put in work. We just need a little help from a professional I guess. Which is why I'm asking about hanrob

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Zoeh   
 

I will never understand how anyone thinks they can send their dog away for a couple of weeks and have returned an obedient compliant dog.  The first training that needs to be done in training a dog is for the human to be trained.   

As i replied to someone else, im not expecting the dog to come back a robot who knows everything. Getting our dog, i knew that we would have to put in some hard effort but as it is our first we are not sure how to go about training her. To have someone come into our home and only tell us what to do and how to train left us a bit confused with out showing or demonstrating. I get that there's going to be a lot of maintenance on our behalf but we do need some help with the ground work. Hence why i asked about hanrob.

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No sure about Hanrob, but we had a dog trained in a stay in situation when we first became dog owners.  

 

Would I ever do it again - no.  I'm now confident in my ability.

 

Did it save the dog's life at the time - absolutely.  We were totally out of our depth and needed someone to help us do the ground work.  We weren't in the right mental space to have someone come in and show us so it was a good solution - seems like it might have been the easy way out, but realistically it was the only way out at that point.

 

Having said that, I went to the 'free' lessons EVERY week for 6 months following the live in session and have trained the dog almost every day for the last 11 years.  If you are looking for an easy fix then live in probably isn't it, if you are looking for some support because you a little out of your depth and are prepared to make a commitment at the end of it then go for it.  (And it seems this is the case.)

 

All the best with your training journey!

 

Xena and Tony.jpg

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Zoeh   
 

No sure about Hanrob, but we had a dog trained in a stay in situation when we first became dog owners.  

 

Would I ever do it again - no.  I'm now confident in my ability.

 

Did it save the dog's life at the time - absolutely.  We were totally out of our depth and needed someone to help us do the ground work.  We weren't in the right mental space to have someone come in and show us so it was a good solution - seems like it might have been the easy way out, but realistically it was the only way out at that point.

 

Having said that, I went to the 'free' lessons EVERY week for 6 months following the live in session and have trained the dog almost every day for the last 11 years.  If you are looking for an easy fix then live in probably isn't it, if you are looking for some support because you a little out of your depth and are prepared to make a commitment at the end of it then go for it.  (And it seems this is the case.)

 

All the best with your training journey!

 

Xena and Tony.jpg

So would you recommend hanrob for someone like I who's kinda of just starting out?

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RuralPug   

Have you considered joining your local obedience club? These clubs are not just for people who trial their dogs competitively - there are a lot of first time dogs owners learning how to train their dogs to just a responsible level. There are once a week classes for as long as you need. :)

 

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corvus   

IME, local obedience clubs are pretty hit and miss. Sometimes there are good trainers and sometimes there aren't. I have seen a lot of dogs in training clubs that take forever to learn anything because the training is not good quality and the owners are therefore not learning effective training. Many dogs also learn to be obedient at the club, but nowhere else. It's the same for any place that uses trainers that may not be qualified. A good place to start is to ask for trainer qualifications and ask them for details about what quadrants of operant conditioning they use and whether they use respondent conditioning. ;) Might sort some of the wheat from the chaff. You may also benefit from classes for adolescent dogs run by qualified trainers. Are you in Sydney somewhere? I know a few more advanced training classes that are good. You learn to train by doing. It's just a matter of how much 'doing' you want to do and with how much one-on-one assistance. If you want the dog to be trained and then pick up where the hardest work has been done and continue on learning with a dog that already knows some things, board and train or day training are good options provided you can find someone you trust. Hanrob is about as trustworthy as most boarding kennels, which is to say, I wouldn't leave my dogs in their care if I could avoid it. I think day training is safer because you are still caring for your own dog.

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