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Spaying - blood test & IV fluids?


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Hi all, I am looking for advice on the need for pre-anaesthetic blood test & IV fluids (pre and post surgery). One local vet has recommended both, while another advised my almost 6mth old Miniature Schnauzer doesn't require IV fluids and that I could discuss the blood test with the vet prior, though they don't routinely recommend it.

 

I obviously want my pup to be well looked after, but also don't want to be paying for unnecessary services. The cost difference between spaying alone and with both options is about $275 ($490 v $215).

 

Any thoughts would be appreciated.  

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Not sure whether Mini Schnauzers have any particular issues with anaesthetics .. if so (as older dogs do, and some Border Collies e.g.  do with some kinds of anaesthetics) then IV fluids can be a good precaution.

Even if blood tests are not necessary for younger animals, it can be useful, at a relatively low cost, to have a baseline for comparison later on.

I probably wouldn't be particularly happy with a clinic which pushed them hard for a younger, fit animal ,... but would also not be happy with a clinic that did not strongly recommend for older (as in 8+) animal.

 

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Nope never get it done & its just a money spinner for most chain clinics these days ,good old fashioned clinics rarely push it & treat each dog on an case by case scenario .We will get it done on our dogs that may have health issues which it may benefit .

I would expect any decent vet to use fluids if required at time of procedure  & any decent vet should be offay with anaesthetics .

WE breed Minis & do not tell our puppy owners its a requirement of the breed ,up to owners if they decide too .

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Dogsfevr said:

I would expect any decent vet to use fluids if required at time of procedure  & any decent vet should be offay with anaesthetics .

Per my vet (not a chain. .. old school .)  they like to have prior authorisation for fluids on older dogs, or dogs with health issues which may compromise them, so that they have a canula in already, and can get fluids in more quickly if needed to support BP.  Makes sense to me.

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When I had my 3 year old girl done I gave permission at the beginning to use fluids if needed as I trusted the vet . She had complications , allergic reaction to anastetic  and insides were a mess after 2 c sections so I'm glad I had given the go ahead.

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I will always authorise these for emergency surgery, or for surgery on elderly or debilitated animals but never for routine surgery on a young fit animal.

It's a bit like crossing the road - even if you take all due precautions you still might get hit by a bus, but it really has a very, very slim chance of happening, so I'm not going to catch a taxi to cross the road to avoid the chance of getting hit as a pedestrian, if that makes sense.

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Sometimes you don't know that fluids and pre-op bloods were required until your dog has a hard time waking up. That happened to Malcolm. He was 5 at the time, so in his prime and well before the age (8?) that vets start insisting on bloods and fluids.

 

Turned out he had undiagnosed Addison's disease. Dogs die from untreated Addison's, especially when operated on, and should always have fluids. We got lucky.

Edited by Papillon Kisses
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It is a personal decision for you but it should be based on you being given appropriate information. 

 

If pre-anaesthetic blood testing is in house then it is available to every patient. It generally tests basic organ function by measuring liver and kidney parameter, protein level, blood glucose and in some cases will include haematology as well. The majority of young patients will not have any abnormalities but without checking, it's not possible to say there is nothing wrong. There can be other complications that arise that cannot be predicted with the blood test. If there are changes, it may mean the procedure is postponed, or that the anaesthesia protocol is modified. I do recommend them for animal from around 7 years onwards, sometimes I will strongly recommend a full blood screen before a procedure. For young animals, a baseline level is nice to have but it is ultimately your decision. 

 

Ideally, I would have all animals on IV fluids if they are undergoing anaesthesia. They will help to maintain blood pressure during anaesthesia (which can be reduced by premedication drugs and anaesthesia itself) which in turn maintains organ perfusion with blood. If there is an urgent need for them (bleeding, anaesthetic emergency) they can be adjusted quickly. While young animals have a better ability to compensate for the changes through multiple physiologic pathways, it does not negate the fact that they do still occur.

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