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Whiskeys Mum

So worried about snakes!!

67 posts in this topic

With all the snakes that have been seen around  in Brisbane, and on the news/facebook etc I am more worried than ever about my Whiskey getting bitten! 

 

My biggest concern is that he is over 50kg and there is no way I can carry him anywhere. 

 

So, if we are out walking in the forest (we only stay on track and I do keep him leashed during spring/summer to be extra sure) and he is bitten, I will not be able to get him back to the car without him walking himself. 

 

He loves his weekly forest walks so much though and we would both be really sad if we had to stop them completely for many months. 

 

So basically what I want opinions on is, if a large healthy young dog gets bitten, would he be ok to walk back to the car with me, or would that most likely not be possible or cause more damage? Also, I have been reading about carrying vitamin c injections to give if this happens, what do people think about this? Worth having on hand maybe? Are there any other treatment tips i should know? (aside from rushing straight to the vet of course) 

 

Is about the only time i kind of wish I didn't have such a huge pup!! 

 

Photo just for aww factor :)

Whiskey photo.jpg

Edited by Whiskeys Mum
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Dogsfevr   

I guess the question is if he is bitten and collapses what is your plan.

If you can walk out calmly then it's a bonus .

I know many of the Retreiving people carry Vit C to hopefully give extra time but in the end it comes down to what type of snake and how your dog reacts .

 

I would more worried about finding out which vets can treat a snake bite if in that area 

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Rebanne   

simple answer is to not walk him there. He won't be sad if he doesn't go, you could find other things for him to do. My dogs love going to the slipping track for a run but they don't go in the height of summer.  So for around 4 months they don't get to have a run. Doesn't seem to worry them one iota.

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karen15   

Instead of forest you could go to the beach eg Sandgate etc My experience with snakes is they hear you coming and move. That said city people really don't keep their eyes out for snakes and IME are quite likely to step directly on one. Have way too many stories of walking with city people in forest and needing to say watch out for the snake for it to be a coincidence. Also evidence snakes don't necessarily move off path. The ones encountered have been python types which may be why, but watching where you walk is important.

 

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karen15   

this lovely fellow was across a single lane road (read huge) where my horse lived. I had to poke him with a stick to get him to move off the road and into the tree. Note for next time, close car door before stick poking incase snakey thinks car is safe refuge.....

plex_wp_edited_image(2).jpg

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karen15   

can I also say please don't go around killing "baby" snakes. One day I came home to a small 45-60cm snake in my bathroom. I thought the pets had killed it, but a couple of pokes with the broom made it move, me squeal and run for the door... It had a triangular head, so likely python, so I called a snake catcher to remove it. Expensive, but I like animals. Turns out it was a burtons legless lizard. Looked like a baby brown. The snake dude pointed out its ears - told him next time I'll use the 200x zoom on the video camera to check LOL broke my heart to realise when my neighbour told me he found and killed a nest of browns it was probably a family of these beautiful snake killers....... Also had a midnight python encounter with a python trying to get in the dog door. Westie had gone to the toilet but refused to come back in. Multiple open doors before I put glasses on and saw snakey, about 1m long.... Again, need to remember to close doors before poking snakes with brooms! Bedroom door wide open as I shooed him into the yard.

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tdierikx   

Baby browns do NOT look like their adult counterparts... eastern brown young can have a black head, orange neck ring, and stripes on the body... pretty but deadly, and feisty as all getout!

 

As for the OP's question about walking a dog after a snake bite... not a good idea, as it will increase blood flow around the body, and the venom will take action much faster. Better to carry a pressure bandage to use on the affected area, and a mobile phone with plenty of charge to call for immediate help to get your dog and self to a vet ASAP.

 

T.

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@Whiskeys Mum

:) 

A few ideas :
Carry a hiking pole or similar to thump on the ground to let snakes know you're coming ..(they feel the vibratiion)
Only ever walk in a clear area, with great ground visibility .
Only ever walk in the coolest part of the day .
never walk in the dark
Always make sure there is some mobile coverage , so maybe you can remain with a bitten animal, and have help come to you ..someone to help carry , perhaps .
Make sure you have one or two proper snakebite bandages ..it's not only dogs who get bitten after all ! 

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Rozzie   

From snake catcher Victoria.

"If your dog or cat receives a snake bite, the best treatment is similar to that of a human:
Compression Bandage: The use of a compression bandage is paramount; beginning at the bite site and continuing down the limb and then back to the top. 
Lock out the joints and bandage as firmly as that for a sprain. 
Splint the limb: A Splint is recommended to prevent peristaltic return; venom is transported around the body through the lymphatic system not the blood stream. This is controlled by muscle movement, the use of a compression bandage and a splint reduces muscle movement and slows the progression of the venom. 
Remain calm and keep the patient still. 
Carry patient to the car and get to the vet as soon as possible. 
Application of ice packs can be an advantage to slow muscle movement and subsequent transportation of venom through the lymphatic system. 
There have been cases of the administering of Vitamin C in dogs; according to a leading Venom Researcher of Melbourne University Vitamin C has no effect on Snake envenomation. It is recommended by CSL limited (the company which manufactures and supplies anti-venom and Snake Venom Detection Kits) that patients are placed on an IV hydration drip as soon as possible to assist in flushing out the kidneys; particularly in cases of Brown Snake Bite. " 

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Gretel   

I was surprised to read a post on fb this morning posted by Vineyard Vet about snakebites. They didn't say anything about bandaging and did say not to apply pressure.

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On 22/09/2017 at 8:24 PM, karen15 said:

can I also say please don't go around killing "baby" snakes. One day I came home to a small 45-60cm snake in my bathroom. I thought the pets had killed it, but a couple of pokes with the broom made it move, me squeal and run for the door... It had a triangular head, so likely python, so I called a snake catcher to remove it. Expensive, but I like animals. Turns out it was a burtons legless lizard. Looked like a baby brown. The snake dude pointed out its ears - told him next time I'll use the 200x zoom on the video camera to check LOL broke my heart to realise when my neighbour told me he found and killed a nest of browns it was probably a family of these beautiful snake killers....... Also had a midnight python encounter with a python trying to get in the dog door. Westie had gone to the toilet but refused to come back in. Multiple open doors before I put glasses on and saw snakey, about 1m long.... Again, need to remember to close doors before poking snakes with brooms! Bedroom door wide open as I shooed him into the yard.

I don't mind snakes but get frightened if they are too close to me (or my animals). I am saddened to say that many years ago I was on my hands and knees digging in my garden and came across what I thought was a baby snake. I panicked, went into a frenzy and hacked it to death with the trowel I had in my hand. It was an instant reaction because I'd touched it and expected it to attack me. When I calmed down I realised it was a legless lizard. I still feel a great deal of remorse over it.

 

As a kid we always had deadly snakes in the bush or by the creek and a fear was instilled in us that has stayed with me. I know I have them in my yard now. I just prefer we don't see each other!

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baby  venomous snakes around the house are sent to their ancestors - as they are more dangerous than adults who have learned how to control envenomations . 
We have numerous , gorgeous  yellow-faced whip snakes  who are left alone ... they are small mouthed, dainty little beasties - very fast , and they are acceptable garden dwellers . 
While venomous, not dangerous ..and lovely to watch .
 

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gillybob   

A suggestion is to get a reptile ident book, they are really interesting and you get to know and understand reptiles.

Up here (northern tableland nsw) snakes are out early in the morning and in the warmer evenings.

I have a bush garden with lots of places for reptiles and have seen two snakes in 8 years. They arnt interested in wasting their venom on us, or dogs, most are bitten when trying to kill a snake.

As Pers says they learn to dry bite, all you need to do is stand still and a snake will go on its way.

 

I miss the pythons we don't get them up here, I had one called Trevor when I lived near Kenilworth, he was a good guard snake, my Bluey and Lab both ignored him.

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Scratch   

Bloody snakes. I don’t even want to talk about the loss and heartbreak they’ve caused me & my dogs.

 

Tonight walking our regular walk across the road we spotted a 4 ft brown on the grass slither into the reeds when it felt us coming. What can I do. Nowhere is truly safe around here. I’ve seen at least 3 in & around my yard in the last couple of years.  A few months ago a snake catcher removed a snake from the footpath in the Main Street! 

 

Tits turns 7 today. He was microchipped so I know he was born 10/10/10. 

 

 

75211954-DA92-4C0B-9663-745E047F16A5.jpeg

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I'm avoiding areas where snakes might congregate eg on bike paths, around watering holes where the birds nest. 

 

But it will be impossible to avoid all together. Our local snake catcher recently went viral with his "weekly spot the snake" picture which highlights how hard they can be to spot. Some of his cases are in areas I live - suburban houses not too far from a reserve. 

 

I keep my lawn mowed short to hopefully discourage them and thistle I think I am going to purchase the snake deterrent training.

 

But all that just minimises our chances, it doesn't guarantee :(

 

I should check the vets near my hiking areas to see if they keep antivenin stock. 

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This was on a chook page, an Australian snake catcher has said it is good, (not sure if that's Snake Catcher on dol) but it seems to be in early stages and doing a crowd funding exercise.  If it does work it would be great around an outdoor kennels area, bit expensive to do a whole house-block, but feasible I guess.  Made in USA but they will supply world-wide.

 

Has anyone here heard of it, seen it, know about it??

 

http://www.atroxsnakebarrier.com/

 

Edit to add: checked again and yes it is Barry, haven't seen him here for a while, the info is on his fb page not the website - Snake Catcher Victoria, google finds it.

Edited by PossumCorner
Fixt
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Kajirin   

Always have to check before even letting the dogs out - mainly on excessively hot days [36ºC and above days].  Browns and Red Bellies are quite often in/near the fenced off dog run [no water is kept out there, but they're seeking coolness especially on hot days as snakes too can die with excessive heat].
 

So used to seeing snakes here, they don't phase me...but I have a healthy respect for them.  The young ones are annoyingly feisty and are the ones to lunge at you [had one feisty one by the front door...didn't realise and it lunged and I jumped back three times and then had to go all the way around the house to get back in through the back door lol].  The older ones generally just slither off if disturbed [they love sunning themselves on the eastern side of the house in hot weather as I have shadecloth set up for my bonsai trees...just the right temp for them].

 

Over summer the dogs don't really get out much, they can't really play in their other yard - too hot during the day.  At night they can't go out as that is when snakes are hunting and they are most active - after recharging all day.  The dogs don't really care, as long as they have their humans about they're content.  They have their fully lit concrete run to piddle and poop in lol - which is part of the house, so they're close and safe.

 

Still wish snake avoidance training was available here in SA - but due to legislation it never can be :(  It has saved many a dog's life [especially when walking in forests etc.].

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