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Hi

we have a 13 week old Labrador puppy who has had two needles. One at 6 weeks and one at 10 weeks. I rang the vet the other day to book him in to get his third vaccination and the VET said he didn't need a third as he is fully vaccinated. Now we are currently in transit between states so I rang my vet at home and they said NO he isn't and needs the third. I'm going to get the third done but is he or isn't he fully vaccinated. Every Vet is telling me a different story. According to my vet if he had his first at 8 weeks then 12 weeks he is done but because its 6 and 10 he's not. What is everyone else doing?  Both his needles were done with Protech vaccine 

 

Cheers 

 

 

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The reason puppies have a course of 3 vaccinations is to cover all in the litter who may not be covered by maternal immunities from the colostrum/milk.

 

The general rule is that maternal immunity will have dissipated fully by 16 weeks, and that should be when puppy has their final vaccination, so that they should be covered for the worst killer diseases out there (Parvo, Distemper, and Canine Infectious Hepatitis - C3 as a minimum).

 

If puppy is not adversely reactive to the vaccinations, I'd be giving him his 3rd shot at 16 weeks, if only for peace of mind that he will be covered against those killer diseases... and don't forget that he'll need his adult booster at 15 months also... after that, it's up to you whether he gets regular shots (annual or 3-yearly regimes), or whether you titre test to check his immunity levels and vaccinate if/when they drop below proper coverage levels.

 

T.

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Thanks T. 

We are getting his third done but it's so confusing when all the vets I have rung all have different answers. His original vet, the one the breeder first had him vaccinated, said he's done at 10 weeks.  The second vet said no needs one at 14 weeks, the vet I rang yesterday said no he's done and my vet back home said 14 weeks then he is done.  What my argument is they all have such a different answer to the question. How can this be. I told them all what vaccine he had so that still came up with a different time line. 

 

Cheers 

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I'd get him done at 16 weeks, and his adult booster at 15 months, then titre test at regular intervals (2 to 3 yearly) to check his immunity levels as he gets older... the vaccine can cover for up to 7 years, believe it or not... longer if he has small exposures over time to those diseases and the antigens are being updated by reacting to said diseases...

 

Vets aren't gods... and they DON'T always know everything...

 

T.

Edited by tdierikx
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It's a matter of probably.  After second jab at 12 weeks, you can be, say 90% sure the pup won't get parvo if exposed.  After jab#3 at 16 weeks, 99% sure.  Don't take those numbers seriously.  It's a hard thing for them to test, and they don't get consistent results when they do test. Can vary between breeds, may be different if weaned early vs late, could vary depending on how strong the dam's immunity level is.  Could also depend on what vaccine is used.  Hope this helps explain why different vets give different advice.

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4 hours ago, Rebanne said:

and just to confuse you further I've never done a puppy vax at 16 weeks. I do a C3 at 7/8 weeks and one more at 12/13 weeks, then the 15 month one.

I have in the past done the 3rd one at 16 weeks .. but the last couple of puppies .. same vet .. he's now happy with just the 2 (although I think that would be different if we were in a high parvo area or season.)     The advice our dog club has been given is that it's probably safe to allow puppies to enrol in our puppy class after their second vacc at 12 weeks (again, assuming no parvo epidemic) .

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We Never do the third but it depends what was used ,we only suggest the 3 If a high risk area but in the end you have to be happy but ask questions what is being used and why ,some vets are truly doing it over the top 

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It will depend partly on the the particular vaccines used, the local area and incidence of parvovirus and which protocols the vet is following - it doesn't mean any of the vets are 'wrong'.

 

Protech vaccines have an early (10 weeks of age if first vaccine given at 6 week and using a 4 week interval). The World Small Animal Veterinary Association recommends a late finish (16-18 weeks) regardless of the type of vaccination used. If you start early at 6 weeks and use the 4 week interval then 14 weeks would be the finish time. If you start at 8 weeks (preferred by many) then that becomes at 16 week finish time. In higher risk areas, then an early start might be preferable and perhaps even requiring an extra vaccination to extend to the full 16-18 weeks if there is an endemic problem. Perhaps ask a trusted vet why they use a particular protocol over another - it may help clear things up (or muddy the waters even more!). 

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Thank you everyone for the info.  5 vets 5 same question 5 different answers lol. He will get his third next week as advised by my vet back home. I guess it all comes down to who you know and trust  I'm just grateful  I have a vet I can trust because for those that don't it will be a very confusing time.  

 

Cheers 

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9 hours ago, Rappie said:

It will depend partly on the the particular vaccines used, the local area and incidence of parvovirus and which protocols the vet is following - it doesn't mean any of the vets are 'wrong'.

 

Protech vaccines have an early (10 weeks of age if first vaccine given at 6 week and using a 4 week interval). The World Small Animal Veterinary Association recommends a late finish (16-18 weeks) regardless of the type of vaccination used. If you start early at 6 weeks and use the 4 week interval then 14 weeks would be the finish time. If you start at 8 weeks (preferred by many) then that becomes at 16 week finish time. In higher risk areas, then an early start might be preferable and perhaps even requiring an extra vaccination to extend to the full 16-18 weeks if there is an endemic problem. Perhaps ask a trusted vet why they use a particular protocol over another - it may help clear things up (or muddy the waters even more!). 

Thank you so much Rappie. Explains it a bit  lol

 

cheers 

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