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DogsAndTheMob

Wild dogs and dingos

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Has anyone seen anything about what breeds/types go farel?  My sense is that some breed contribute nothing to the farel gene pool, and other, quite a lot.

Edited by sandgrubber
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On 09/03/2018 at 8:27 PM, Thistle the dog said:

Hey all, that person I watch posted some updates on their local feral dogs. They found one of the current litter of puppies wandering in a storm and have taken it in. Will be interesting to see how it behaves, being a few generations removed from human handling:

 

tumblr_p558lnkq6n1w5ej4ho1_1280.jpg

 

I

Thanks for posting this. They’re amazingly healthy-looking, although the rescued puppy looks like the runt of the litter (or possibly a different litter or different sire). He looks as if he might have prick ears as an adult dog. I wonder if the puppies all have the same sire and if the sire(s) are dogs from the feral group or domestic dogs. 

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3 hours ago, sandgrubber said:

Has anyone seen anything about what breeds/types go farel?  My sense is that some breed contribute nothing to the farel gene pool, and other, quite a lot.

I’ve read some old newspaper articles about particularly troublesome wild dogs. One appeared to be mostly husky, and another one looked like a border-collie cross. However, that’s just a couple of examples, and most wild dogs don’t look like any particular breed. Herding and hunting breeds that are more likely to be worked in the bush, and high energy breeds that are frequently exercised near the bush would be at greater risk of getting lost in the bush. I suspect many of those die a lonely, miserable death, poor things. Chance may be a big factor determining which ones survive long enough to add to the feral gene pool.

Edited by DogsAndTheMob
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These particular dogs “base stock” were beagles, bloodhounds, Fox hounds etc. interestingly this area also has a couple of roaming domestic stray dogs (a terrier type, a beagle cross) and the ferals don’t seem to interact with them but the other domestic dogs will. 

 

 

The relatives of the watcher are keeping the little runt one and they are trying to catch the other puppies to hand to shelters or home to ppl

 

Note: These dogs are in america

 

Edited by Thistle the dog

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Tits   

I’ve seen red/sandy coloured, what I’d call yellow, and Black and Tan wild dogs together on the Nullarbor miles from anywhere. All appeared Dingo size & type 

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tdierikx   

Dingoes come in a variety of colours... depending where they are from mainly... I recently had 3 pure pups here (DNA checked) that were black and tan... very pretty!

 

T.

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This is a wild dog I mounted for Vic gov last year. From Eastern vic /Alps area. I've had quite a few this color and also white with black or tan with shaggy coats.

5ab70e8e75106_wilddogEasternvic..thumb.jpg.e4f973346058443d435ceba76d383a95.jpg

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This is tangently related to the topic of wild dogs and how genes change. 

 

Someone had their suspected coydog (an actual genuine coydog) DNA tested. 

 

https://my.embarkvet.com/dog/frenzi

 

i wonder how the coydog population compares to dingo hybrids. Do they then merge in with the wild population and become (visually) indistinguishable from “true” dingo/coyote after awhile? A bit of a boost to transitioning visually at least compared to the red feral pack that don’t have the “help” of true feral relatives to share genes with (but have started keeping self separate from roaming domestics)?

 

some pictures of the mix:

 

http://pupcontent.tumblr.com/post/172662997682/frenzis-embark-dog-dna-results

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Update on "Midge", the feral runt pup that was caught. She is developing upright ears!  I think this makes her the first of the feral pack they've seen to have uprights:

tumblr_p7koosOzmq1w5ej4ho1_540.jpg

she is described as taming up wonderfully and fond of cuddles

 

in comparison, one feral pup and an adult feral ("Little"):
tumblr_p6y0otvRs41w5ej4ho3_1280.jpg

 

that one white feral:
tumblr_p6y0otvRs41w5ej4ho1_1280.jpg

 

the tricolour wasn't in their recent photos, wonder where it is at? I believe someone was coming in to catch some of them, maybe they caught it:

tumblr_p5jqaiKnh11w5ej4ho5_540.jpg

 

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tdierikx   

They are so pretty... and so healthy looking... sad that they are feral and cause issues...

 

"Little" looks like there may be some Beagle in the mix somewhere...

 

Midge is gorgeous!

 

T.

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Midge is s confirmed first upright ears! Look at their size!

 

i wonder if her healthier pet diet contributes to stronger ears? The remaining two feral puppies are flop eared. 

 

The red mum appears pregnant again. Hoping they succeed in catching her

1119535E-27E3-4B9D-AEC5-F4EF72A0D2C5.jpeg

Edited by Thistle the dog

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tdierikx   

OMG! Those ears are to die for... lol!

 

All the better to hear when the treats are coming out, yes?

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Midge!!  :love:  there's upright , and there's magnificent !!  She is just gorgeous ......    What an absolute little star  :)

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10 hours ago, Thistle the dog said:

i wonder if her healthier pet diet contributes to stronger ears?

I would presume a different father , rather than a better quality diet ....

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The feral dog poster has been sharing lots of photos lately!

 

First is the startling contrast between the runt who has “tamed up” nicely and the pup they were unable to catch

 

midge so far appears the only up ears. But with her drastic size difference and shape I do wonder if a domestic roaming dog didn’t contribute to her DNA to have her so varied to the rest versus feral ears transitioning to up?

 

 

7B9C0598-E6A4-4494-B5BD-295A422AB588.jpeg

03F97DA3-339C-4AED-A71A-9FA9FB1D815E.jpeg

Edited by Thistle the dog
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The red mum had pups and the family managed to catch them! 

 

The big white girl is going to a family member and the red with a “ridge” on her nose went to a coworker so hopefully we will get to see how they mature up. 

3E9753AF-43F8-47ED-B4F0-1BD58F0A73FC.jpeg

8132410F-1A1C-466C-9523-E2A6F89DECFC.jpeg

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tdierikx   

Loving how healthy the wild older pup is looking... and Midge is SOOOO pretty!

 

Pity the family can't catch some of the mums and get them desexed... but then again, those girls would be pretty smart about getting caught by now... *sigh*

 

T.

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Big D   

Dingos ARE "Wild Dogs"
They can and do breed with other dogs that have gone feral, but technically there is no distinction.  So when the APB refers to "Wild Dogs" that includes Dingos so you may well find that your local "Wild Dogs" are comprised mostly of the Dingo breed.

Dingos are supposedly descended from similar dogs that arrived around 5,000 years ago, so its not surprising that over those thousands of years a fairly narrow phenotype developed.  Furthermore, like a resistant bacteria, its not surprising that after 200 years of being hunted, shot, and baited, they are not only fully adapted to the Australian bush, but have become very difficult to capture and kill.  A domestic dog that goes feral has none of those "advantages" so I would imagine their survival rate is much lower, and hence why the dingo characteristics continue to dominate the Wild Dog population.

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