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jacks4nik

Borders vs Aussies?

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Hi all. I live on acreage in south of WA. Have owned many breeds including working dogs. My last border was a bench, so I'm familiar with the huge problem with the grass seeds. I've never owned an Aussie yet I'd really love to hear your opinions on the differences between the true double coated borders and Aussies. Also is it true they have a higher energy level and better with the babies and toddlers? I'd really love all aspects of your opinions as here is my only truly reliable source. 

Thanks guys.

 

 

 

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On 2/8/2018 at 6:52 PM, Airedaler said:

Are you talking about terriers or collies?

 

It was a serious question

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ness   

My friends have Aussies and I have BCs. Like anything there are individual differences in dogs in both breeds. I know as far as BCs are concerned there is a huge variation in energy level and temperament just as there are Aussies with huge variation in temperament. For instance one of my BCs would be considered super high drive but she is nervy around strangers and really doesn't cope with kids whereas my other girl is high drive (but with an off-switch) and has been bred to have a super stable temperament and is excellent with young children. I would think as far as coat goes they are pretty comparable. There are certainly lines of more moderate energy Aussies around but its definitely worth finding a breeder who knows there breeding lines and can properly assess what puppy might be most appropriate for your particular circumstance.

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Have been running a Training school for 25 years in a semi rural area and hence have worked with many breeds, especially the working breeds of border collies, kelpies, etc... Have also bred 20 litters of Aust Shepherd so will give you some ideas of how they differ.

 

One standard answer to the difference between Borders and Aussies... is that Aussies have an off switch... ready to get up and run around when. needed but then lay down and just hang out in the house quietly. A Border Collie (as with a Kelpie) is primarily bred as a Sheep Dog - requiring stealth and focus which boarders on fixation. Great for a sheepdog but not so adaptable for a family lifestyle.

 

However the Aussie is a Ranch Dog, therefore the Aussie needed to be more versatile - it needed to work sheep AND cattle both in the fields and in yards. Also to let the rancher know when someone was coming to the farm, to chase the coyote/fox away from the poultry, not to mention they also hung around the house looking after the kids and keeping the family company. This required an Aussie to have a stronger mental ability to allow them to adapt to these different roles.

 

In our classes we generally find the Border to be more reserved with strangers or in new situations. They can be unsure when meeting new dogs and tend to give off the vibe of being a little nervous, thus often other dogs don't feel to comfortable around them. Many Borders are unhappy to have strange dogs approach and will give nervous snaps...

Generally most Aussies are very positive with meeting new dogs or people, they might wait quietly to see how things go but are willing to make new friends. Other dogs also seem to be comfortable and interested in Aussies, probably due to the more relaxed attitudes. 
With coats this can vary in both breeds -  Often Show Borders are heavy coated whereas the working lines are more close and low maintenance. Again with the Aussies, many in the show scene seem to favour the big heavy coated dogs which look more glamorous but then there are also many (in and out of the Ring) that have a shorter wavy coat or lighter undercoats - some lines seem to throw the easier coats but it is really a bit hit or miss. I have one girl who has a straight lighter coat with less undercoat but has still produced offspring with some heavier coats

 

Of course there are variations within any breed and you may find some breeders work very differently to others in the way the pups are raised. The first 12 weeks of a pups life can definitely set the pup up for success. It is not enough to just say that puppies are raised in a family environment (easy for people to talk the talk / but much harder to walk the walk.

 

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