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jwt

Can I lock a dog in a small room?

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jwt   

Hi, I am thinking of getting a dog and I don't have experience. I have a young child and I understand that I always should supervise their interaction. Sometimes I am not able to do it. I wonder is it ok if I lock a dog in a room about 6-7 square metres? The total time would be 3-4 hours per day. If yes, I should look for a certain temperament. What would you suggest?

 

Approximate schedule: 1 hour in the morning and also between 3-6 pm. The dog will be allowed inside when child is at school, we work from home. When locked, I want the dog to stay quiet.

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Rebanne   

no, you would be better crate training it so it is still part of the family. And as the child is school aged they can be trained as well to leave the dog be. As for being quiet then that also needs training.

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Dogsfevr   

Why does it need to be locked in room.

What activities do you want to do with your dog each day .

Do you want an inside dog or mainly an outside dog .

Where will it sleep 

How much exercise is in your plans .

How old is child and are they ready for a dog .

 

As for being quiet that comes down to training and that training is also part of its daily training to be a good family pet .

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jwt   

My child will be 6 soon but has an intellectual delay and is a slow learner. It took nearly a year to teach not to squish guinea pigs... During the day I would like the dog to stay mainly inside. In the night it can be either. Not much activity, maybe walks 3 times per week and backyard for other days. And several short break plays per day.

 

A crate that you suggest, is it like a big cage that is placed in the room with people? I don’t know much about the dog training, I am afraid I may do it wrong.

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I don't see the harm in using a whole room versus a crate. It will give the dog somehow quiet to retreat and rest - provided you introduce it to the room much like you would with a crate. Lots of treats. A bed. Some toys for the dog. Don't keep them in there for too long, keep them involved in your life in other times of the day and frequent potty breaks if you get a young puppy.

 

With the crate, I'd worry about the child putting fingers in and inadvertently hassling the dog when trying to rest.

 

Would make sure nothing in the room for the dog to destroy or be injured by. No electrical cords, bags, sentimental value photos. All potential chew toys. But a couch and a bed, water, food.... really nice and quiet :)

 

Don't forget to enroll the dog in a puppy class, to get that extra help on helping the dog fit in to the family.

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If you choose to use a room instead of a crate, perhaps think about putting a high baby gate in the doorway, or even installing an internal screen door on that room. The dog is more likely to be happy and quiet if it isn’t just locked behind a solid door. 

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Ok .. Using a room as a kennel  may well encourage barking & scratching at doors . Being a first time dog owner, doing a LOT of homework  is essential . There are a hundred questions like this one ... good for you :)  

A new puppy/dog  needs a LOT of work . About the same as a young child  . Do you have the time/energy to do this? 

Does your child like dogs ? How do they react to dogs being in their space /taking their toys/ pushing at them /barking at them ? 

have a read here,  to give you more of an idea of what dogs need /do best with.  :) 

https://www.sitdropstay.com/do-you-really-want-a-dog/

Oh ... have you decided WHY you really want a dog at this time ? 

Edited by persephone
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5 hours ago, Thistle the dog said:

I don't see the harm in using a whole room versus a crate. ….

I do.  Solitary confinement is a high end punishment for human prisoners.  Because we are social animals.  As are dogs.

 

Sin bin for even two or three minutes is an aversive.  For hours on end there is no benefit.

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I don’t allow pups free run of the house but I have a large pen in the living room  to keep them safe. I can reinforce calm and quiet by tossing treats/dry food onto their bed. I can give them safe toys to shred, food puzzles and the like. I don’t like isolating dogs in a room either. It certainly encourages barking and scratching. 

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It’s a bedroom, not solitary confinement. It’s no different to a  crate, play pen or kennel or backyard. 

 

Introduce it slowly and in a positive manner. Literally the same as crate training except the crate is a whole room and they’re able to move about. Food. Water. Chew toys. Puzzle toys. Bed. 

 

Heres a quick guide: https://www.google.com.au/amp/dogtime.com/reference/dog-training/16567-teaching-your-dog-to-be-alone/amp

 

If if it doesn’t suit that particular dog you change your approach but no harm giving it a go if you plan and prepare. 

 

Unfortunately dogs can not be with most family members 24/7 so better to plan and build their skills for coping with alone times asap rather than just dropping it on them one day. The earlier you build it as routine the less upset the dog will be when you actually  *have* to leave it alone.

 

Obviously start out small and don’t just pop then in it for 4 hours up front short of an emergency. 

Edited by Thistle the dog
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jwt   

I am searching for a dog that is described as “suitable for full time worker, not overly needy and can entertain itself”. I’ve read through a lot of profiles and I understand that maybe just 1-5% of all offered dogs suit my needs. I am looking for an adult dog, not a puppy.

 

We recently took a staffy on a trial and my child just loved it (except liking face). Unfortunately we returned it because it was too active and seeking attention, we couldn’t concentrate on work.

 

I have experience with many other types of animals including cats. But I can’t take a cat because it’s easy to go to the backyard and then roam all around, there is a road near house.

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Dogsfevr   

I think & no offense intended you need to access your work aspect & whether right now is the right time for a dog because you can't just return each one until the right one appears & most adult dogs depending on what lifestyle they have been exposed to won't be use to being locked away in the way you want  so it will require more work in some cases than a puppy
Finding the right dog that will have the right nature to get on with your son is the most important factor & that dog may also be the one that is more energetic .The dog needs will be as much a factor as your son gets older & will want more from the dog .

So i would look at what your long term plans are ,
I could suggest some breeds but it truly is based on how rough or gentle your son is,what he reacts too with dogs & how he reacts as to what could be the best fit

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Tassie   

I can understand your concerns about a cat, but to be honest, in your situation, I think a cat would be a better fit.   You might need to spend a bit of money up front setting up an enclosure so the cat can have safe outside time, ideally with secure access from the house.    And if you and your child enjoy going for walks, it's quite possible to train a cat to walk nicely on a harness ... but they'll survive perfectly well without being taken for walks ... so less pressure.   And since many/most cats are happy to sleep most of the day away, there's much less pressure to train, entertain etc.  

Just something to consider.   A dog really is a major commitment of time, energy and patience, and maybe now is not the right time in your life for a dog.

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juice   

I’m not really sure why you want a dog ?

you want to lock it away from sight , don’t want it expecting attention while you work , hardly walk it , and to deal with a child that might not behave appropriately to it . A cat seems a better option . 

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Dogs are very much companion animals, my interpretation of your posts suggest it may not be the right time for a dog.

 

A cat, or even a large rabbit might fit your family better.

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31 minutes ago, juice said:

I’m not really sure why you want a dog ?

you want to lock it away from sight , don’t want it expecting attention while you work , hardly walk it , and to deal with a child that might not behave appropriately to it . A cat seems a better option . 

I’ve been biting my tongue, @juice, but you have said exactly what I have been thinking.  Except I wouldn’t even suggest a cat as: "It took nearly a year to teach not to squish guinea pigs.”  Cats can be gorgeously squishy, but they can scratch.   

 

Getting a dog should be like getting another family member.  Unlike a new family member, a dog isn’t shut away to have a couple of hours afternoon snooze.  

 

@jwt, it is good that you have asked these questions and told us about your family situation, but I, too, am having difficulty understanding why you want a dog. You have to consider the dog’s needs as well and if you have doubts that you can meet those, put “having a dog” back on the list for a time when you feel more up to it.  

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jwt   

But I think many full time workers have dogs that stay alone 8-9 hours per day, right? What I am offering to a dog is better... And it's better than a pound. I hope my child will learn how to behave nicely. It may take time, but once achieved, a dog will not be locked.

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I don’t think the situation sounds ideal for many dogs, if you are so worried about the interaction with your son I wouldn’t bring one into the home at all.

Maybe was until he is older and more able to understand what is ok and not ok.

 

A large robust cat could be a better option as long as you understand if he’s too rough and gets scratched it’s not the cats fault.

 

Not sure why the confused symbol????

Edited by Rascalmyshadow
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jwt   

No, really... what is better: to stay in the pound (with a chance of being executed) or to live with a family just being locked 3-4 hours per day in the beginning? Or if I take not directly from a pound but from a rescue group, then they will be able to save next dog from the pound.

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