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sjl81

Viewing potential puppy, Alarm signal or not?

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sjl81   

Hello all,

 

I have expressed interest in a local Staffordshire bull terrier puppy and the breeders have said they are happy to meet with us in a park in town. To me this seems rather strange and I said so in reply to them. Their response to this was that they have had dogs stolen from them in the past and now don't allow potential owners to their house to view dogs. I kind of understand this but from my point of view I would like to see the environment they are brought up in, make sure its not a puppy farm or conditions are feral.

 

What are peoples thoughts on this? Is this unusual?

 

Thanks Sarah

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Selkie   

I had a similar situation. The breeders did not want people on their property for quarantine and privacy reasons. I felt these reasons were solid, but I was not willing to commit to 10+ years with a dog without seeing the parents, so I went with another breeder.

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As a breeder I am also very careful. However I get to know potential puppy buyers very well before we even meet - emails back and forth plus phone calls. No-one just rings and comes over to visit. I might invite them to meet me and my dogs at a central location or visit us at a competition, follow me on social media etc. By the time I have pups we already have established a trusting relationship. Then I take plenty of precautions so as to protect the health of the pups as much as possible. Some of the nicest people I know own pups of my breeding. 

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Dogsfevr   

We have people out to view but a lot of talking happens prior to weed out the serious people to the I want to play with puppies kind .

 

If you feel uncertainty then trust your head 

Edited by Dogsfevr
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Rebanne   

I think more and more breeders are doing 1st meetings away from home. But once a relationship has been built then you should be able to visit the home IMO. My last litter I had a buyer from interstate. She was on board long before the litter was born, I stalked her FB page,  requested a copy of her drivers license, googled her property etc all before saying yes to a pup. Pup was flown over and is now an adult.

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juice   

Plus you don't always get to meet the parents anyway as the breeder may not own both.

Mine doesn't let you see all his dogs for security either, depends on the breed and the chance of them being stolen and what sort they attract.

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asal   

Thieves dream the pressure put on a breeder to let people onto their property to case it.

As for the right to judge a breeder by every Tom Dick and Harriet who haven't a clue other than what animal rights have said constitutes "ethical".

Latest press release from that quarter is on about the champion racehorse who has decided won't leave the barrier anymore is he will be relentlessly bred to 900 mares a year! Impossible even for any stallion, let alone a gelding???

 

As those who worked in newspapers used to say "any resemblance to the truth is purely coincidental and the management will not be held responsible"

Edited by asal
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I think you should meet them and the puppy and see what your gut says about them then. The fact they are letting you meet the puppy in advance is a plus and given the breed there could be a very legitimate concern about theft. Juice is also correct - few breeders own both mum and dad and in some cases they may not even own mum (she could be on loan). Ask them simple questions like do they have mum and dad, how many litters do they have at the moment, how many do they have coming, how do they keep them all separated, how do they keep up with all the work, do they have a good vet, like you are just interested in their successes and in being a responsible future pet owner. Pay attention to the questions they ask you too about your ability to care for their pet for the next 10 plus years. If their first questions to you are about money that would be a red flag for me. All this interaction might give you an idea if they are a back yard breeder pumping out puppies to make money. If they know nothing about the puppies and have just been sent with it to meet you then that could mean puppy farm. No breeder would miss an opportunity to meet a potential new owner.

 

My only other advice is to not fall for the trap that if these people are dodgy you need to buy the puppy to save it from them. That fixes nothing for all the puppies and breeding animals in their care now, or in the future. Money is what drives them. Also have you looked here on DOL at what stafford pups are going for so you can consider that against what this breeder is asking? And you do know that a 'rare blue staffy' is shite don't you?

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1 hour ago, Little Gifts said:

My only other advice is to not fall for the trap that if these people are dodgy you need to buy the puppy to save it from them. That fixes nothing for all the puppies and breeding animals in their care now, or in the future. Money is what drives them. Also have you looked here on DOL at what stafford pups are going for so you can consider that against what this breeder is asking? And you do know that a 'rare blue staffy' is shite don't you?

yes, and yes!
Do you know their breeder's prefix, their kennel name ? eg  Dokus's dawgs , or Princess pea's precious pups ....  whatever 

maybe have a read of this too ..just to give you some idea :) hope it all goes well 

CLICK HERE  please :)

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Big D   

People get justifiably concerned about giving out their home address to every random on the internet, and letting then come and case their home. 
I would ask them to bring also the mother, and if possible father to the park.

If they are a registered breeder, you can check their bonafides with the relevant association, and maybe also get a guide on how many litters there are producing, etc.

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Very the same with poultry.  Yesterday I bought a pair of ducks, seller would only meet at a park for handover.  I don't have randoms come to my house either to buy chickens - for-sale ads price includes delivery within x kilometres of y.  And for balance, two poultry hobbyist breeders were targeted this month, thousands of dollars worth of birds stolen as well as equipment etc.  Dog breeders have every reason to be cautious (just as the stolen sheep business is alive and well).  

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They have good reasons, and you have good reasons. Just one of those conflicting interests in life. I'd say go ahead and meet in person in a park, get a feel of the person and the dogs and they can also get a feel for you.

 

Then see where it goes from there.

 

Personally I wouldn't get a dog who's home environment I couldn't see ( i would compromise by having a trusted mutual friend visit if possible), so if the breeder is one who's really not comfortable with someone visiting their home then we'd have to part ways with our two opposing non-negotiable. Hopefully no hurt feelings.

 

As others say, if you're feeling hesitant about this breeder for whatever reason...trust your gut and find somewhere else :) 

Edited by Thistle the Best Dog

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Safety is a consideration for the purchaser as well. Many years ago, I went to an isolated property to look at a pony for my daughter, and was unnerved by the seller’s reaction when I said I wouldn’t buy the pony. I drove away, and the seller followed me at speed to the property’s front gate.

 

Now, I’d be wary about meeting a seller anywhere, unless I had good reason to believe they were genuine.

Edited by DogsAndTheMob
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