Jump to content
dejapole

9th Storey Apartment

18 posts in this topic

dejapole   

Hi guys,

 

Long time reader first time poster. 

 

I currently live on the 9th floor and am looking to find a blue English staffy to give a good home to. 

 

My concern is that they are quite adventurous and may like to jump on the balustrade which is only 1m high. 

 

Has anyone had experience with staffys and living up high and can you train them to avoid doing so. 

 

Thanks. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dogsfevr   

I would not even trust a trained dog ,the risk is too much

Make it dog proof and with a good plan for entertaining a dog for apartment life then doable but it takes a lot of commitment from an owner in all weather to keep an apartment dog mentally amused and content . 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RuralPug   

I simply would not place a dog in such a home, the risk of accident is far too high. You need to increase the height of the balustrade first, with lattice or fencing, then look for a dog. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't risk it myself as there is too many risk factors. A staffy would not be a suitable choice for your living situation.  However if you are set on one, please research your preferred colour as I believe there are a lot of health issues with it. While it's great to have a preference I'd look at the right personality and health of the dog over the colour. 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
karen15   

Admittedly I've only owned one staffy, but they are very active dogs IME. I wouldn't think them suited to apartment living. I moved with my boy into a 2 bedroom unit when he was 10. I've got a 200 sq metre courtyard - that's approx 1/3 of a standard house block. That was just ok size wise for him in his golden years. I certainly couldn't have had him as a younger dog in this space, he would have been super destructive. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, RuralPug said:

I simply would not place a dog in such a home, the risk of accident is far too high. You need to increase the height of the balustrade first, with lattice or fencing, then look for a dog. 

Rural Pug.  Body corporate comes into this.  You cannot make exterior changes without permission such as what you suggest with raising the height of the balustrade incorporating the methods you suggested.  Unfortunately, with  body corporate, there are many rules and regulations that need to be adhered to by all residents.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
juice   

If this isn't a troll ( blue staff, apartment), then no, they jump high and bounce over stuff, it will have no idea its a killer drop the other side. Apartment with a highly active dog, you would be insane.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Boronia   
9 minutes ago, juice said:

If this isn't a troll ( blue staff, apartment), then no, they jump high and bounce over stuff, it will have no idea its a killer drop the other side. Apartment with a highly active dog, you would be insane.

School holidays?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
juice   

my first thought, lets drag out the blue staff and add apartment for more amo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dejapole   

Not a troll. 

 

Thanks for the feedback. 

 

The only reason i considered it is one of my best mates has a blue English staffy and she is just so lovely and placid while also being incredible and energetic when we are playing away from home.  

 

I thought I’d ask the opinion of other owners as I have read that they are quite adventurous dogs. 

 

I do have a fairly large apartment and balcony but based on comments above may wait until I move into a house one day. 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

55 minutes ago, dejapole said:

 

I do have a fairly large apartment and balcony but based on comments above may wait until I move into a house one day. 

I think that is the best idea.  Even the best trained and happiest of dogs can get over excited and go off cliffs, balconies and the like.  

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
juice   

Sorry for the troll mention , but happens a lot . 

Staffs bounce on thin air , I had one that could bounce over a 6 foot gate easily . 

There are plenty of dogs that can live in apartments, greyhounds for one . 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your owners corp may not approve a staffy anyway. Many have bylaws that only permit small dogs under 10kg, though some might give exception to an old dog or greyhound. And if they have a problem you then have to go to the tribunal and argue that they’re being unreasonable.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep agree with all the above - IMHO you need to consider temperament first - and find a dog who will happily live in an apartment, doesn't get upset if they can't get outside during the day and generally has low maintenance requirements - in other words a lounge lizard! Like a westie or a greyhound.  But a grey would be a great choice.  I love staffs, but not for apartment living. Good luck with it all. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hippo   

I think it's do-able but definitely wouldn't be giving staffy unsupervised access to the balcony with such low clearance. A friend of mine has lived with her GSD from puppyhood to present (5 years old) purely in apartments. I've lived in single room sharehouses with my cattle cross. It's do-able if you put the time and effort in.

 

I would rethink the blue colour though. It's irrelevant to the staffy personality.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CandB   

Not saying it couldn’t possibly ever be done, but an awful lot of factors would have to align perfectly, strata rules, dog’s own temperament and so on. Even then I don’t reckon I’d be comfortable, my Staffy X could spring 6 feet into the air from a sit (which never gave me a heart attack or anything, not at all lol). Any efforts to make your balcony as safe as possible could backfire and see the dog try to jump out of desire to get a view or escape from a loud noise...I’d be too worried to do it.

I’d be looking at another breed until you get a house. Bonus being that if they’re chilled enough for apartment life, they’ll likely take the move to your house in their stride.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just on another note.  My husband and I own a couple of apartments for investment and I am on the body corp. committee.  Last week we had an annual general meeting and one of the members whose neighbours above her says she can hear the dog most of the day barking and whining.  She has spoken to the the owners and of course, they didn't realise.  Generally, apartments do not cater for dogs as homes do with a garden for the dog.  Personally, I think it's unfair to have a dog in an apartment as there is not of outside places said dog can go whilst alone for the day.  The regulation the Victorian Govt has passed allowing tenants to have dogs in rented properties has not been thought out very well.  Having said that. we have just rented out a brand new town house to a family of 5 with a golden retriever, but the difference is there is garden space, unlike an apartment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RuralPug   

Overseas dogs in apartments with no garden space or balcony is very very common and it is just a matter of getting the dog into a routine where they are walked several times a day for peeing/pooping purposes as well as exercise walks for health and enrichment.

That is why dog walkers are in such demand overseas, they do lunch time walks for owners who work all day. A dog can be just as bored and lonely in a huge backyard as inside an apartment - and, as most of us are aware, there are sadly a lot of bored and lonely dogs barking all day in big yards! :cry:

But it is a matter for the body corporate to decide.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×