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HunterDoggy

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9 posts in this topic

My employer recently attended a seminar held by her, she was very... adamant that ANKC breeders were to blame for inherited psychological issues in puppies. 

Her whole seminar was about dogs with, apparently, OCD and anxiety, and I'm told the session ended with a business plug, left a bit of a sour taste in my mouth is all. 

 

I'm still on the fence about how I feel about her work personally, but if it's given you a direction to work with for your dog and his/her, issues I think that is good :)

 

I apologise that I don't have any personal experience to offer with regards to OCD and anxiety in dogs - I have a dog currently that eats innapropriate objects but that's about it haha

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kamuzz   

Is Mita still on this forum?  Here is some information she gave me back in 2005. And I'm guessing it is still valid. I don't know exactly who the vet was.

 

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The 3 main things the uni vet told us to do were:

1. set up a place where the dog would spend time alone (or with the other dogs) even when we were home, with water, toys, kongs, whatever. And we had to put items that strongly had our scent on them there.

This was so the dog could learn to be confident & happy not having its owner in its presence.

2. ignore the dog, only give attention when it was quiet & not trying to make demands by screaming, whining, barking, being physically pushy.

This was so the dog could learn that the 'bad' behaviours did not bring what it wanted...good things from the owners. But 'good' behaviour would.

3. specially ignore the dog for 5-10 minutes before leaving home....& 5-10 minutes on arriving home.

This was to hose down the owner's coming & going being a big emotional thing.

4. teach the dog basic obedience of obeying 'Sit' to get all good things (food, treats, pats etc) & make it stay & wait when a person was going thro' a doorway or gate.

This was so the dog could learn who was the boss...which helps relieve anxiety. And also learn what the 'good' behaviours were, that would earn good things from its owner.

We were told to be consistent doing these things....& all people coming in contact with the dogs had to do the same.

A lot ....like the big doses of ignoring... were like an intensive program...& gradually could get more relaxed as the dogs' behaviour changed.

We were also told that the dog would notice the changes in interaction with its owner....& MIGHT try the demanding behaviours even harder at first. But to hang in there...because that showed the dog was noticing something different was happening.

With time & consistency & practice... new learning would kick in. And it did.

 

The tib will still sometimes give screaming, glass-shattering shrieks as we come home up the deck stairs. But we turn our backs, totally ignore & don't open the door....& immediately her learning kicks in....screaming doesn't get good things. Her voice trails off, there's quiet, we open the door & she gets her cuddle.

 

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RuralPug   

Yes. Mita is still around. And yes, that information is still applicable! Good memory there, kamuzz!

 

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That advice for SA is kind of outdated. The aim is to desensitise and counter condition the dog to departures and alone time, not lay on the -punishment for behaviour resulting from the caregiver pushing things too fast. Otherwise all you’ve achieved is learned helplessness rather than a legitimately happy dog.

http://www.allpetseducationandtraining.com.au/all-pets-ed-case-studies/january-10th-2018

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My dog has generalised anxiety disorder, noise phobia and canine compulsive disorder (ocd light/shadow chaser). We also see a vet behaviourist and he takes medication. Make sure you do behaviour training too; meds aren’t a silver bullet. You could ask your VB for a referral or look at the PPGA website. Another thing we’ve found helpful is K9 Nose Work. Instructors listed here.

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