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White_Shadow

Cavalier king charles or Poodle (Let's stick with CKCS!!)

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Looking into getting a puppy that both parents/ lines are best as can be health wise. I really love both the cavalier king charles spaniel and the poodle. The poodle especially due to the almost no shedding part. 

 

We have 4 kids(soon to be 19, 15, 13, 8). We also have 3 cats all rescued, ragdoll x, persian x and russian blue x. All desexed vaccinated m'chipped etc all about a year old, russian blue x could be older. 

 

Would be happy to adopt a 'younger' dog or get a puppy(which might make it easier for the cats to adapt to her(thinking that would be best).).

 

I'm the mum at home, I'll be the main carer of dog/or pup. 

 

Hubby is happy to consider a purebred, but as I said the health is of most importance ( he is really worried spending a good amount to see a pup die from ill health). 

 

We are thinking of buying in July 2019. If you know a very good breeder with health/ good lines being top priority it would be awesome. The puppy/dog would get desexed if not already done. Vet that we use can be provided and desexing proof provided to breeder if 'required' for their own peace of mind. 

 

More than happy to keepin touch with  the breeder, with photos etc even visits if they wish to come see how the pup/dog is going. 

 

As I said we are thinking around July 2019. We want to make sure we're ready and well equipped. 

 

Looking forward to hear which breeder is recommended in both breed.

PS. We are wanting to buy from SE QLD. I don't want the pup/dog having to travel a long way (flights etc).

Thankyou

 

Poodle or Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.(PS. I know hubby would prefer the lowest to non existent shedding, but for those that have a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, do you find the furmigator to be doing quite a good job so that is almost non existent too?)

 

Edited by White_Shadow
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RuralPug   

Please don't take this the wrong way, but I find it quite concerning that you are choosing between two breeds with completely different temperaments and activity levels which suit completely different lifestyles. I'm not sure what you have based your choices on, but it really should be based on your family lifestyle and how much time you can devote to your dog and how much and what type of responsiveness you require from them. 

If you are giving a high priority to low shedding, bear in mind that the lowest shedding breeds have the highest grooming needs which will take a LOT more time to keep the coat in shape than high shedding breeds which, generally speaking, you can minimise shedding by a 10 minute grooming session every other day for a small breed. The Furminator is designed to remove loose undercoat so is best used on double coated breeds. The other thing to remember about low shedding is that allergy to actual dog hair is rare, the common allergy is to dog dander (skin flakes) so amount of shedding won't affect the allergy.

Poodles - What size poodle are you looking at? In Australia, my experience has been that the three sizes of poodle have different temperaments. They are all very intelligent, however it seems to me that most of the Toy Poodles and some of the Miniature Poodles do tend toward neurotic behaviour, which I have never observed in Standard Poodles. If you want a Toy or Mini I would recommend finding a breeder who has had a great deal of success in gaining obedience and/or dog sport titles with their stock.

Poodles are a lot of dog, so unless you are willing to dedicate your life to dog sports, obedience work or similar activities to keep their brains busy, please don't get one. Just my opinion. Poodles do shed, but due to their coat structure the shed hair remains in the coat and does not drop onto your carpets or furniture, which is why they need an enormous amount of grooming compared with most other breeds. You need to cost in the time needed for at home grooming to keep them free of matted coat plus the expense of regular six weekly professional grooming. You can call around the grooming salons near you to get an idea of pricing.

It is recommended that you choose a poodle breeder who uses sires and dams that have (a) passed the x-rays for Hip Dysplasia (and Legg-Perthes Disease in Minis and Toys), (b) are clear of Patella Luxation, (c) have been passed clear of the myriad eye diseases (including PRA and cataracts) to which poodles are prone , (d) have been DNA tested as clear of Von Willebrand's Disease and (e) have tested clear of any thyroid malfunction.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel - this is ,generally speaking, a much more laid back dog than the poodle. However, they are a companion breed and can get anxious if left too much to themselves. They have a single coat and a Furminator is not needed. A simple comb or pin brush used thoroughly every second or third day will minimise shedding and is also required to keep the silky coat from tangling. They are perhaps not quite as intelligent as the poodle but more than make up for that with their devotion which makes them eager to please - which is why cavs are often prize winners in obedience.

It is recommended that you choose a Cavalier breeder who uses sires and dams that have (a) screened as clear of any heart murmur (b) have been screened clear of the several types of eye diseases that were once common in this breed, (c) are clear of Patella Luxation, and  (d) have been DNA tested clear (or are clear by parentage) of Curly Coat Syndrome.
 

Sorry, this has turned into War and Peace lengthwise! But I suppose the point I am trying to make is that before you ask for recommendations of breeders, you should more thoroughly research to establish the breed that will suit you best.
 

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Can you give more information about your day to day activities and what the dogs lifestyle would be.

 

I think with your kids ages either would be fine, poodles need a lot of mental stimulation even the tiny ones more so than a cavalier,  cavaliers tend to have a beautiful soft temperament, I have never met an aggressive/nasty one (I’ve handled a lot) poodles however can however range a lot in their temperaments from calm and friendly to extremely nervous and reactive, just something to keep in mind when searching for the right one.

 

Both have a few known health issues so make sure you do plenty of research and find a breeder that test for everything necessary, poodles obviously don’t she everywhere but need bathing and blow drying at least fortnightly with haircuts every 6-8weeks, cavaliers are quite heavy shedders but if bathed and properly blow dried with a force dryer each fortnight it will lessen it, their coats are easier to manage being straight.

 

Poodles often have a high prey drive (even the toys)so some are good with cats while others can be terrible even if they grow up together, this is less likely to be an issue with a cavalier.

 

Hope this helps a little.

 

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Chloe08   

Hello

i just happened to see this post and thought I might comment. I am not an expert but I have had three cavaliers and currently own a cavalier and a standard poodle. As mentioned above the cavalier has a soft nature and requires less stimulation than my poodle. He sheds a lot but it can be reduced by regular brushing. He is very loving to everyone.

 

I keep my poodle in a simple short cut and the grooming requirements are greatly reduced but I get her groomed every six weeks. My standard poodle is highly intelligent and needs regular exercise and likes to learn new tricks. We attend regular training. Despite coming from a great breeder and careful socialisation she is a reactive/anxious dog and I have invested a lot of time and money into her, however I think this is not usual of the standard poodle as I have met many and they have been more stable than mine. I would want to know the temperaments of both parents before purchasing another one. Despite this I would get another poodle as I love their personalities and the lack of dog hair on my clothes and furniture. Good luck with your search. 

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4 hours ago, RuralPug said:

Please don't take this the wrong way, but I find it quite concerning that you are choosing between two breeds with completely different temperaments and activity levels which suit completely different lifestyles. I'm not sure what you have based your choices on, but it really should be based on your family lifestyle and how much time you can devote to your dog and how much and what type of responsiveness you require from them. 

If you are giving a high priority to low shedding, bear in mind that the lowest shedding breeds have the highest grooming needs which will take a LOT more time to keep the coat in shape than high shedding breeds which, generally speaking, you can minimise shedding by a 10 minute grooming session every other day for a small breed. The Furminator is designed to remove loose undercoat so is best used on double coated breeds. The other thing to remember about low shedding is that allergy to actual dog hair is rare, the common allergy is to dog dander (skin flakes) so amount of shedding won't affect the allergy.

Poodles - What size poodle are you looking at? In Australia, my experience has been that the three sizes of poodle have different temperaments. They are all very intelligent, however it seems to me that most of the Toy Poodles and some of the Miniature Poodles do tend toward neurotic behaviour, which I have never observed in Standard Poodles. If you want a Toy or Mini I would recommend finding a breeder who has had a great deal of success in gaining obedience and/or dog sport titles with their stock.

Poodles are a lot of dog, so unless you are willing to dedicate your life to dog sports, obedience work or similar activities to keep their brains busy, please don't get one. Just my opinion. Poodles do shed, but due to their coat structure the shed hair remains in the coat and does not drop onto your carpets or furniture, which is why they need an enormous amount of grooming compared with most other breeds. You need to cost in the time needed for at home grooming to keep them free of matted coat plus the expense of regular six weekly professional grooming. You can call around the grooming salons near you to get an idea of pricing.

It is recommended that you choose a poodle breeder who uses sires and dams that have (a) passed the x-rays for Hip Dysplasia (and Legg-Perthes Disease in Minis and Toys), (b) are clear of Patella Luxation, (c) have been passed clear of the myriad eye diseases (including PRA and cataracts) to which poodles are prone , (d) have been DNA tested as clear of Von Willebrand's Disease and (e) have tested clear of any thyroid malfunction.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel - this is ,generally speaking, a much more laid back dog than the poodle. However, they are a companion breed and can get anxious if left too much to themselves. They have a single coat and a Furminator is not needed. A simple comb or pin brush used thoroughly every second or third day will minimise shedding and is also required to keep the silky coat from tangling. They are perhaps not quite as intelligent as the poodle but more than make up for that with their devotion which makes them eager to please - which is why cavs are often prize winners in obedience.

It is recommended that you choose a Cavalier breeder who uses sires and dams that have (a) screened as clear of any heart murmur (b) have been screened clear of the several types of eye diseases that were once common in this breed, (c) are clear of Patella Luxation, and  (d) have been DNA tested clear (or are clear by parentage) of Curly Coat Syndrome.
 

Sorry, this has turned into War and Peace lengthwise! But I suppose the point I am trying to make is that before you ask for recommendations of breeders, you should more thoroughly research to establish the breed that will suit you best.
 

Thankyou for your input. Standard Poodle I was thinking of. The reason I asked about both breed is from the research I had done (online) is that they are both a great family pet and peaceful with cats as well. I'm home all the time almost except for a couple morning here and there and occasional afternoon out (shopping). 

 

I most admit that I'm more inclined toward the Cavalier King Charles spaniel. I'm more then happy to brush every day any ways. The reason why we're thinking July 2019, is actually to also make sure we choose the right breed. Really love the information you've given me. 

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4 hours ago, Rascalmyshadow said:

Can you give more information about your day to day activities and what the dogs lifestyle would be.

 

I think with your kids ages either would be fine, poodles need a lot of mental stimulation even the tiny ones more so than a cavalier,  cavaliers tend to have a beautiful soft temperament, I have never met an aggressive/nasty one (I’ve handled a lot) poodles however can however range a lot in their temperaments from calm and friendly to extremely nervous and reactive, just something to keep in mind when searching for the right one.

 

Both have a few known health issues so make sure you do plenty of research and find a breeder that test for everything necessary, poodles obviously don’t she everywhere but need bathing and blow drying at least fortnightly with haircuts every 6-8weeks, cavaliers are quite heavy shedders but if bathed and properly blow dried with a force dryer each fortnight it will lessen it, their coats are easier to manage being straight.

 

Poodles often have a high prey drive (even the toys)so some are good with cats while others can be terrible even if they grow up together, this is less likely to be an issue with a cavalier.

 

Hope this helps a little.

 

I'm home pretty much all the time except a couple morning here and there. Regular walks especially are planned and being with me as a companion. 

Plus it would encourage my oldest daughter to walk after school with us as she as put on weight (not a lot) but a little due to tegratol.

 

We want a faithful family companion, like hubby says preferably one great with cats also.

 

Thanks again

Edited by White_Shadow

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1 hour ago, Chloe08 said:

Hello

i just happened to see this post and thought I might comment. I am not an expert but I have had three cavaliers and currently own a cavalier and a standard poodle. As mentioned above the cavalier has a soft nature and requires less stimulation than my poodle. He sheds a lot but it can be reduced by regular brushing. He is very loving to everyone.

 

I keep my poodle in a simple short cut and the grooming requirements are greatly reduced but I get her groomed every six weeks. My standard poodle is highly intelligent and needs regular exercise and likes to learn new tricks. We attend regular training. Despite coming from a great breeder and careful socialisation she is a reactive/anxious dog and I have invested a lot of time and money into her, however I think this is not usual of the standard poodle as I have met many and they have been more stable than mine. I would want to know the temperaments of both parents before purchasing another one. Despite this I would get another poodle as I love their personalities and the lack of dog hair on my clothes and furniture. Good luck with your search. 

Thanks. Yes I've read that neurotic, anxious behaviour can be possible in the standard Poodle as well which is they say choosing carefully. Thank you. 

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If you are looking at standard poodles be even more careful about your cats, I’m not sure where you have read your information but they are a hunting dog and chasing/grabbing in many is an instinct that is hard to stop.

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1 minute ago, Rascalmyshadow said:

If you are looking at standard poodles be even more careful about your cats, I’m not sure where you have read your information but they are a hunting dog and chasing/grabbing in many is an instinct that is hard to stop.

Yes I'm starting to think I've read the info at the wrong place! :) But everything I've read about the Cavalier seems spot on... Thanks

Edited by White_Shadow

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Gretel   

I know of a standard poodle who really wanted to kill the family’s cats. He was serious! Cavaliers moult constantly and furminators damage their coat. I wouldn’t recommend using one on them. If hair about is a major worry a Cavalier is not the dog for you! I’ve had them for many years and they are wonderful dogs. They are friendly and many are very amenable to training. 

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11 minutes ago, Gretel said:

I know of a standard poodle who really wanted to kill the family’s cats. He was serious! Cavaliers moult constantly and furminators damage their coat. I wouldn’t recommend using one on them. If hair about is a major worry a Cavalier is not the dog for you! I’ve had them for many years and they are wonderful dogs. They are friendly and many are very amenable to training. 

A good brush daily should keep that under control :)

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Chloe08   

Also friends of ours who liked the cavalier but wanted a small non shedding family dog chose a Havanese , they are very happy with this choice. 

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juice   

i love Cavs, my neighbor owned 2, one came from a dodgy byb, really nervy , scrawny and health issues.

she learnt and the other one was adorable and healthy.

I would love one, but i don't think a breeder would give me one with a Bull breed.

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Dogsfevr   

Cavaliers are a sporting spaniel ,highly intelligent thrive at obedience & are highly competitive in the obedience world ,they are a real dog that people turn into needy .

Yep they shed,can snore & wake the dead .They are athletic,active,smart infact i find them more stable than Poodles(again though its what the owners create ) These aren't hand bag dogs .

Grooming on a Cavie is easy BUT when spayed they can get the crazy spay coat which can make it more challenging ,grooming regularly is a must spayed or not .

I have owned one & have friends who are breed/show Cavies there not the breed for everyone & there not the breed many imply they are aka couch potato ,there happy learning,pleasing & being a real dog

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Malamum   

Just a comment on the hair thing.

 

I'm the neat freak in our house and before I had dogs I didn't like the thought of dog hair everywhere and we got two Alaskan Malamutes (go figure) which in the hair everywhere stakes is probably about a 10/10.   I soon got over being too worried about it as my love for my dogs made the hair thing not bother me as much as when it was an abstract concept.

 

Stick vacuums are your friend.  :laugh:

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Pandi is a Toy poodle, very healthy & loves playing with her toys,  1 hour morning &  1hour evening, I do training at home with her in this time as well, 

the rest of the day she spends sleeping next to me,  and whatever  I'm doing at the time. Pandi is 2 years old & a lovely sensible dog, as a pup she was quite playful, & I think all pups take a lot of your time, that's to be expected they are babies.   I love that she does not shed hair all over the house, in my  bed, on my lounge,  I learned to groom her myself, & find it easy now she is older & sensible :) 

 

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Actually.. here's an interesting thought.. 

 

My 2 Heinz variety dogs, super hair shedders - I hardly ever bath them. They never smell. They roll in sorts of weird stuff, and swim in muddy dams!

 

My little Shih tzu,  2 weeks is about the limit before bath time! And I clip him every 2-4 weeks to keep his coat a comfortable length.

 

There is obviously extra expense (and inconvenience) associated with a non shedding breed requiring regular grooming.

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@crazydoglady99 Hi,  maybe if you give the  super-hair shedders  a bath & blowdry every week or 2,  that would wash out the loose hair, & help them feel cooler in Summer                                     

I clip Pandi every 8 weeks,  bath each week- because I can see she feels good after a bath,  she never smells doggy,  she smells gorgeous  

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Thankyou everyone! No one recommended a breeder but I've received a lot of valuable extra information from those that deal with the breed first hand.

 

I've looked through the breeders list and I've filled out an inquiry form with a specific breeder. I'm only waiting for the time that hubby and I have agreed on to choose from the litters(if any by then) to 'apply' and get everything rolling.

 

I can't wait :) <3

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