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37 animals seized from storybook farm rescue

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That "chewed off " leg stump was horrid....well , everything was.

Just beyond anything I could imagine a rescue would ever do.

I hope a lot of those poor dogs got a cuddle and a needle...and oblivion.. And awoke in a beautiful place.

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~Anne~   

I know that people hate restrictive legislation, but the sooner rescues are legislated and tightly controlled, the better. 

 

This may well have been a case of being overwhelmed, and we’ve seen many others over the years. We’ve also seen many organisations and groups claiming to be rescues, when they’re just farming dogs and we’ve seen far, far too many that are just money scammers and frauds. 

 

We need strict controls. Social media has amplified the ability for the wrong kinds of people to be involved in animal welfare. 

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I agree. Problem is, how do you find these 'pop-up' FB rescues?  

 

We've got lots of things out there. We've got online ACNC and fundraiser licence checks, state microchip registries and reporting, dog ownership council regs & state regs, AWL & RSPCA will go out per reports, rangers will too. But nobody is working together to govern rescues in particular. It could be done with what is in place currently and wouldn't have to be so heavy that rescues couldn't operate at all. Maybe the majority of those that are running as a complete shambles could be helped if there was something concrete in place.

 

I'm getting to where I trust maybe a handful of rescues. Despite some having thousands of supporters (or likers and followers), some of the stuff happening in facebook rescue makes me cringe but nobody notices what's going on amongst the 'you're an angel' posts. 

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tdierikx   

Facebook is too easy to delete posts you don't like...which can skew things somewhat... *sigh*

 

Plus it's full of crazy people who love a good sob story, and follow blindly anything they perceive as "helping the poor souls"... but reality may be a bit different, yes?

 

T.

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Maddy   
2 hours ago, Powerlegs said:

I agree. Problem is, how do you find these 'pop-up' FB rescues?  

 

We've got lots of things out there. We've got online ACNC and fundraiser licence checks, state microchip registries and reporting, dog ownership council regs & state regs, AWL & RSPCA will go out per reports, rangers will too. But nobody is working together to govern rescues in particular. It could be done with what is in place currently and wouldn't have to be so heavy that rescues couldn't operate at all. Maybe the majority of those that are running as a complete shambles could be helped if there was something concrete in place.

 

I'm getting to where I trust maybe a handful of rescues. Despite some having thousands of supporters (or likers and followers), some of the stuff happening in facebook rescue makes me cringe but nobody notices what's going on amongst the 'you're an angel' posts. 

It seems like what happened at Storybook would have been uncovered a lot sooner if someone was allowed to go there and just have a good look around.

And you'd think.. let's say yearly inspections, wouldn't be too hard to write legislation requiring that rescue premises be inspected once a year, just to make sure everything is okay. It doesn't need to be a restrictive, cumbersome system (like legislating down to the minutiae), just basic checks to make sure everyone has adequate food, water, shelter and care, and that no one is walking around with only three and a half legs. It shouldn't be that hard to manage.

And rescues should want this, because hell-holes like Storybook damage the reputation of rescue, as a whole.

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~Anne~   
44 minutes ago, Maddy said:

It seems like what happened at Storybook would have been uncovered a lot sooner if someone was allowed to go there and just have a good look around.

And you'd think.. let's say yearly inspections, wouldn't be too hard to write legislation requiring that rescue premises be inspected once a year, just to make sure everything is okay. It doesn't need to be a restrictive, cumbersome system (like legislating down to the minutiae), just basic checks to make sure everyone has adequate food, water, shelter and care, and that no one is walking around with only three and a half legs. It shouldn't be that hard to manage.

And rescues should want this, because hell-holes like Storybook damage the reputation of rescue, as a whole.

Writing a piece of legislation might sound easy but in truth, it’s not an easy process. Yearly inspections would require manpower and resources. I’m not sure about other states but I do know a little about how NSW companion animal legislation and governance works and there is barely enough at state or local level to support anything more than what currently exists. It’s why microchipping has such mediocre compliance too. 

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Yep, legislation takes a lot of time and effort to write and get passed. But I agree with this concept. I'm actually feeling a little suspicious now about supporting any rescue that I cannot ever visit, even just to drop off goods. I don't need the grand tour and I don't need it to be pristine because it's a working rescue but I need it to be safe for the animals there. The state government used to have a Community Visitor scheme for kids in care (not sure if it still exists). I don't think they were paid but they were trained and they reported back to the Children's Commission and only matters of concern or requiring action were progressed. Perhaps a Community Visitor scheme could work for rescue groups too? I know it would be another thing for a busy rescue to have to deal with but it could also give a rescue group more clout and exposure. Certainly the more people who know about a rescue group the more supporters, foster carers and volunteers can be born of that relationship.

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Maddy   
5 hours ago, ~Anne~ said:

Writing a piece of legislation might sound easy but in truth, it’s not an easy process. Yearly inspections would require manpower and resources. I’m not sure about other states but I do know a little about how NSW companion animal legislation and governance works and there is barely enough at state or local level to support anything more than what currently exists. It’s why microchipping has such mediocre compliance too. 

 

Obviously it would be just like most things related to animal welfare, people would have to lobby for it to happen and to get resources. If rescues don''t bother to have a voice in the conversation, organisations like the RSPCA will lobby, and small rescues will not come out better for it :shrug: 

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tdierikx   

Let's not forget that the body that would end up tasked with any formal inspection process via any legislation would be the RSPCA... which I'm sure even those doing the right thing should/would be leery of. Essentially they, as the largest "rescue" organisation would be calling the shots over their "competition"... scary thought...

 

I don't have an alternate answer to the problem, but I do know that I wouldn't want the RSPCA in charge of an inspection process. I see that as a conflict of interest at the very least - with a very real possibility of an abuse of power. Plus the fact that they are not held accountable to any higher power... nuff said...

 

T.

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I think I would like to see rescues loosely aligned with the same legislation breeders get that is managed by their local council area. IMO RSPCA should be the exceptional cases like storybook farm and puppy mills in regulating rescues but for things like annual visits to see things like the five freedoms are happening and the rescue not becoming overwhelmed. 

 

I think annual inspections would go a long way towards spotting those struggling. Might not help with things like storybook where they are specifically covering up but the more genuine ones needing help or outsider eyes to point out they’re slipping. 

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43 minutes ago, Two Best Dogs! said:

I think I would like to see rescues loosely aligned with the same legislation breeders get that is managed by their local council area. IMO RSPCA should be the exceptional cases like storybook farm and puppy mills in regulating rescues but for things like annual visits to see things like the five freedoms are happening and the rescue not becoming overwhelmed. 

 

I think annual inspections would go a long way towards spotting those struggling. Might not help with things like storybook where they are specifically covering up but the more genuine ones needing help or outsider eyes to point out they’re slipping. 

This feels good TBD! Plus another thing that could help struggling incorporated rescues is to be aware of operating supports and funding options that are out there. In QLD we have funding that comes from gambling monies for everything from buildings to vehicles. So few orgs know it exists. Yes there is a process to follow to apply for it but RSPCA does it pretty much every single round and from the animal world they have little competition. So imagine your ' annual inspection' comes from a rescource officer type person rather than an inspector who is there to both monitor your compliance but also offer you knowledge, support and resources so you could be more successful! Oh be still my heart! These types of roles already exist in other areas of the state government (the old Dept of Families) for the child care sector and community funded programs so it wouldn't even be reinventing the wheel.

 

I agree with T that seizure and prosecution is best left in the hands of the RSPCA. But if not local govt then what about state govt from somewhere like Dept Primary Industries who would already have an inspectorate type role? Yes it would require more infrastructure money but what is the endless cycle of dumped and abused dogs costing each state now? Each region might only have 5 - 10 registered rescue groups in their geo area. It might also spawn some great educational programs for the general public about pet ownership (thanks for nothing there RSPCA) and more knowledge about rescue in general.

 

Honestly my heart is racing at the thought we might find a solution to animals having such a small voice in this country.

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So here is another situation in the UK that monitoring could assist with - the prevalence of backyard breeders and puppy farms dumping their damaged goods on rescue and getting away with it. It happens all the time out here and clearly it is the same over there (and in the US). They make the money and then rescue gets hit with all the costs of vet care for these poor animals. I actually think an inspection/visitation/monitoring program would help give a higher profile to this issue too so that not for profit rescues aren't bearing the brunt of the problem. Because it is council and government who approve these facilities without seeming concern for the problems that are created by these money makers for others. They wouldn't get away with dumping chemical bi-products in to waterways so why are they getting away with dumping damaged living creatures on an already overburdened volunteer based rescue infrastructure? Hell they would even be fined if they dumped a load of dog shit on a footpath so why is it ok to dump animals they created that they no longer want? Where is the logic in that? You own it - you are responsible for it.

 

https://www.facebook.com/wonkypets.rescue.7/posts/2371091353109833?__tn__=K-R

Edited by Little Gifts
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8 hours ago, Two Best Dogs! said:

I think I would like to see rescues loosely aligned with the same legislation breeders get that is managed by their local council area. IMO RSPCA should be the exceptional cases like storybook farm and puppy mills in regulating rescues but for things like annual visits to see things like the five freedoms are happening and the rescue not becoming overwhelmed. 

 

I think annual inspections would go a long way towards spotting those struggling. Might not help with things like storybook where they are specifically covering up but the more genuine ones needing help or outsider eyes to point out they’re slipping. 

I can see the problem being that groups who use carers would be a) too expensive and random to police and b) I can't see many carers who just want a dog or two a year being happy with having  strangers inspect their private home.

 

Visiting carers or if that can't be done: receiving photos and verifying I.D. w/ written agreement should be up to the rescue. And the rescue should have their ducks in a row. And if they need help getting themselves organised, a bit of organising amongst the various registries and authorities would go a long way to helping. Even some written material would be a start! 

 

I can't say who but I've been watching another rural 'sanctuary' setup and while they are still in the honeymoon period of collecting a mass of animals it's going to fall to sh*t eventually. :( 

 

We'll end up with knee-jerk legislation that makes it impossible to rescue at all. 

 

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Spoiler

https://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/rspca-qld-confirms-up-to-100-pets-sent-to-live-at-storybook-farm-are-still-missing/news-story/9eca23b46623a43f9eb5e9271382dc3f?fbclid=IwAR11lE7HQr0fC6jEzi5DCJES1xcSmMWZb1QvPESzlRtvbUXDwGzswnmGGKc

 

RSPCA Qld confirms up to 100 pets sent to live at Storybook Farm are still missing

Jodie Munro O’Brien, The Courier-Mail
March 26, 2019 12:28pm
Subscriber only
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LILY-ROSE the dachshund corgi cross is one of a possible 100 dogs still not accounted for following a raid of a north Brisbane farm for disabled animals.

RSPCA Queensland Chief Inspector Daniel Young says they’ve been inundated with calls but are still appealing for more information following the March 20 raid of the Storybook Farm Sacred Animal Garden property in Whiteside, where inspectors seized 37 disabled or injured animals.

RSPCA’s horrific find at Storybook Farm

Visitors to Storybook Farm say they were stopped at driveway

“We have accounted for thirty-seven animals but we are still working on finding out what happened to the rest of them,” he said.

“The calls we have received indicate there could be nearly one hundred animals who were sent there but cannot currently be located.

“This is a particularly complex situation with a lot of information still coming in. We want to make sure we have all the facts.”

  Lily-Rose, a corgi-dachshund cross, is one of the nearly 100 dogs sent to the Storybook Farm Sacred Animal Garden in Brisbane that is said to be unaccounted for. The rescue group who put through Lily a year of rehabilitation wants to know where she is. Picture: Puppy Tales Rescue and Rehoming, Inc.

A dalmatian seized from the property for disabled animals - operated by Lisa-Jayne Cameron - and a horse seized from an associated property have since had to be euthanized.

Most of the seized animals are continuing to receive veterinary treatment at the RSPCA Vet Services in Wacol and at the Veterinary Specialist Services in Jindalee.

No charges have been laid in the raid.

The Courier Mail has sought comment from Ms Cameron

Kerrie Gebert, 43, from Puppy Tales Rescue in Merrimu in Victoria said Lily was in the care of the rescue group for 13 months before Ms Cameron contacted them three years ago and offered to take the dog into her care.

RSPCA: So many animals, so few carers a “recipe for disaster”

Opinion: How Storybook Farm betrayed our trust

“We were contacted by LJ who gave us a spiel of how amazing Storybook was … and we had other people telling us how amazing it was, so we sent Lily up,” she said.

“She sent me a friend request on Facebook and kept me updated by letting me know Lily was doing well, but now that I think about it, they were rarely photo messages. The only photos she sent was when Lily had been out to events.”

Ms Gebert said the group had sent Lily to the farm with a pink wheelchair, which they eventually noticed other animals using in photos shared on social media.

“LJ called me in the middle of the night in January 2017 to let me know Lily had eaten her tail and had to have it amputated,” she said.

“Not long after that, she called to tell me she had been eating her legs and had to have her legs amputated. She told me this was a common thing for dogs with spinal injuries and that she would be taking her to the vet to undergo surgery to have both legs removed.

“The next update we received from her was a photo of Lily in a nappy and you couldn’t see her legs. We time framed that photo to be about November 2017.”

  One of the 37 animals seized from the Storybook Farm Sacred Animal Garden property undergoes a CT scan at VSS Jindalee this week. Picture: RSPCA QLD.   One of the 37 animals seized by the RSPCA from the Storybook Farm Sacred Animal property undergoes a medical examination at VSS in Jindalee. Picture: RSPCA.

Ms Gebert said volunteers who travelled to Queensland to visit Lily were told to meet Ms Cameron at a beach, instead of going to the home.

The Courier Mail revealed last week that visitors to the Storybook Farm, when it was based in Canungra, were usually prevented from entering the house and, in some cases, even reaching the end of the driveway.

Ms Gerbert was among a number of people, including from rescue groups, who have tried ringing and sending text messages to Ms Cameron since the raid to try to find out where their dogs are, but said she has not responded.

“We just want to bring lily home, though it’s looking now like she’s no longer with us,” she said.

I’ve spoken to some people and the RSPCA and there has been no word or sightings of her since the move to the new property.

“I just want to know where Lily is. I want to bring her home, to be with the other dogs who have passed on and to have answers to find out where she is,” she said.

Ms Gerbert said Lily’s former owners surrendered Lily to the rescue group after thinking she had been hit by a car.

  This dachshund is one of 37 animals the RSPCA seized from a farm for disabled animals last week. The animals have been receiving treatment at the RSPCA Wacol vet and the VSS Jindalee. Picture: RSPCA Qld.   One of the 37 animals seized from the Storybook Farm Sacred Animal Garden property undergoes an examination at VSS Jindalee this week. Picture: RSPCA QLD.

The dog, who would now be 12, underwent spinal surgery and rehabilitation therapy in Victoria for more than a year before being listed as available for adoption.

Ms Gerbert said she and her volunteers saw a post go up on the Storybook Farm Facebook page to raise money to transport Lily up from Victoria.

“There was a shout out on her Facebook page saying ‘This is Lily, let’s help save her,’ so she actually raised money from her followers to take Lily out of care,” she said.

Another dachshund, named Slinky, from a separate rescue group is also among the unaccounted for dogs, Ms Gerbert said.

“LJ called her the night before the raid and told her Slinky had passed away from a seizure,” she said.

“We don’t know where slinky is or where her body is, we don’t know anything.”

Lara Heggie, 32, of Morningside, thought she spotted her eight-year-old dachshund, Monty, in a video of the raid released by the RSPCA on Thursday.

However, she has since been informed by RSPCA inspectors that the microchip to the dog in the video did not match Monty’s microchip number so now had to wait for the RSPCA to complete their investigation.

  Monty the dachshund was thought to have been spotted in a video released by the RSPCA as one of the dogs seized in a raid of the property known as the Storybook Farm Sacred Animal Garden. However, her owner claims the RSPCA has told her the microchip numbers with Monty and the similar-looking dog in the video do not match. Picture: Lara Heggie

The vets at Jindalee have performed neurological examinations and CT scans on 12 of the disabled pets seized in the raid.

RSPCA Queensland Vet Anne Chester said they are hopeful that something can be done.

“We would love to see these animals with a marked improvement in their quality of life and to be able to live pain free,” she said.

“Without the very generous assistance of time, expertise and equipment on offer from our friends at VSS Jindalee this exercise to see the best way forward for these poor dogs wouldn’t be possible.”

  One of the dogs seized from a farm for disabled animals is assessed at the Veterinary Specialist Services in Jindalee. Picture: RSPCA Qld.

RSPCA Prosecutions Officer Tracey Jackson said people who sent their animals to Storybook or donated money should contact police or the Office of Fair Trading if they have any information.

“It’s just wonderful to see these dogs being assessed and now we are beginning to see a light at the end of the tunnel,” she said.

“We’re looking forward to trying to reunite some animals with their owners and find loving new homes for others.”

If anyone has information about any animals related to Storybook Farm please ring the RSPCA on 34269999 or email [email protected]

  Some of the vets, from Veterinary Specialist Services in Jindalee, assisting with examinations of the 37 disabled or injured animals seized from the Storybook Farm Sacred Animal Garden property. Picture: RSPCA QLD.

 

 

I've removed the photos because they were big. 100 animals still missing from Storybook. The stories are very sad. :( 

Edited by Powerlegs
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I am not surprised they already have indications of unaccounted for animals based on comments on the RSPCA's FB posts from people frantically asking about pets they surrendered to the group. This is sounding like one of the worst cases of animal abuse I have ever heard of in this country.

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I think you're right LG. :(  

 

This sounds ghoulish sorry but she has to have been burying them somewhere. I think if they took metal detectors out they would get pings from collar buckles. Maybe find some answers for some dear people who have lost dogs. I don't think we'll ever know where they all are. 

 

Those poor inspectors and vets. It's nightmarish. 

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I can’t track it, it’s too upsetting :(  Especially on Facebook that plays videos without warning. 

 

It does seem to be shaping up to be the worst rescue/hoarder/exploition of dogs I have heard of. Obviously hoping it’s one of a kind and not others that are similar in existence. 

 

If there are rescues or individuals  finding this similar to their conditions I hope this is their wake up call to get the animals to people who can care for them. Don’t let it get worse and hope for the best :(

 

 

Edited by Two Best Dogs!
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Boronia   

Maybe DOLers can share this ABC info

‼️CALL FOR INFORMATION - CAN YOU HELP RSPCA?‼️

RSPCA Queensland is appealing for the owners of a Staffordshire Bull Terrier seized in the Storybook Farm raid to get in touch.

The dog, who has been named Pauly by RSPCA staff, was discovered with one of his hind legs crudely amputated, at the property in north Brisbane on March 20.

They say it's extremely important they find out how Pauly came to be with the group.

“We’d like to speak with the owners or whoever may have dropped him at Storybook Farm so we know a little more about what we are dealing with. There won’t be any judgement, it’s simply about working out how and when this poor dog came to be at Storybook," RSPCA Queensland Chief Inspector Daniel Young said.

Pauly has since had further surgery on his leg and is recovering with RSPCA vets watching over him.

Meanwhile, RSPCA said it’s staff are waiting for the dogs to be officially handed over by the owner of Storybook Farm so they can start either sending them back to their homes or getting them ready for adoption.

If you have any information about Pauly or any of the animals surrendered to Storybook please contact RSPCA Queensland by email on [email protected] or by phone on (07) 3426 9999.

Image may contain: dog and outdoor
 
 
 
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